Tarantino wrong to say Polanski rape was consensual, says victim Samantha Geimer

Samantha Geimer says Quentin Tarantino was dead wrong to suggest she welcomed her rape by Roman Polanski in 1977 — but she’s willing to cut the director some slack. In an exclusive interview with the Daily News, Geimer said she was surprised to wake up …

Read more from Samantha Geimer…

Public School Sex-Ed’s Descent Into Madness

On June 14, the school board of Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS), the tenth largest school division in the United States, will convene and likely approve a number of changes to its sex-ed program, including replacing the term “biological sex” with “sex assigned at birth,” teaching that children aren’t born male or female, minimizing the role of abstinence, and excising clergy from a list of “trusted adults.” Although I am a product of FCPS, as was my mother and a long list of aunts, uncles, and cousins on both sides of my family, my children will not be attending their local elementary school. The radical sexual pedagogy promoted by FCPS, coupled with its well-publicized laxity in confronting illegal sexual behavior by its staff, has convinced me that my eldest daughter, who will enter kindergarten this fall, would be safer in a private school.

The latest recommendation by the county’s Family Life Education Curriculum Advisory Committee builds upon other sex-ed trends in FCPS, where “oral sex” is introduced to kids as young as 12. Thirteen-year-olds, meanwhile, are told about “anal sex” 18 separate times in one year’s worth of lessons. I understand why: the proliferation of pornography accessible to our youth has made sexting and increasingly aggressive sexual activity ubiquitous problems for FCPS and school districts across the country. Studies have shown that a majority of pornography depicts violence against women. As the adage goes, “monkey see, monkey do.”

Still, the committee’s recommendation to remove clergy from the list of “trusted adults” is ridiculous, given that FCPS has been dogged by illegal sexual activity by its employees for years. In March, a Sandburg Middle School teacher was charged with possession of child pornography. Last year, a former girls’ basketball coach at Lake Braddock Secondary School was accused of sexually harassing players—the school administration kept him on staff for months after the allegation was raised. A 2016 investigation by the local News4 I-Team discovered that the response of FCPS to multiple teachers accused of sexual misconduct—with students, no less—had allowed those educators to keep their teaching licenses for years after the offenses. A Bailey’s Elementary School teacher was arrested in 2015 and charged with sexually assaulting a teenage boy between 2004 and 2010.

FCPS has repeatedly demonstrated its lack of responsibility with our children, maintaining a policy towards sex offenders more relaxed than my local Catholic diocesan schools, while introducing children to sexual practices fraught with health dangers. Why should I trust a school system that perpetuates the demonstrably false narrative that public school educators are more trustworthy than priests, pastors, or rabbis? It’s bad enough that one day my children may attend colleges that permit, if not encourage, the kinds of risky sexual behavior depicted in Jon Krakauer’s 2015 best-selling book Missoula. Without a proper education, they’ll lack the maturity to navigate these treacherous waters as 12- and 13-year-olds, let alone as college freshman. As Cicero warned, “the enemy is within the gates; it is with our own luxury, our own folly, our own criminality that we have to contend.”

I suppose I’m not terribly surprised by the increased abasement of the school district that educated me. When I was in tenth grade, a ninth grader at my school attended a party where she got drunk and was persuaded into a compromising position by upperclassmen. Those boys (who to my knowledge were never punished) took pictures and sent them to a popular local radio host, “Elliot in the Morning,” who spoke about them on-air. The girl was, of course, humiliated and ended up transferring schools. I think she even changed her name. (As an aside, how has that DC101 disc jockey avoided legal scrutiny? He spoke publicly about viewing what amounts to child pornography!) We’ve certainly come a long way since 1999. With handheld, Internet-accessible phones now ubiquitous among our children, how could things not descend into even more alarming harassment, abuse, and misogyny?

FCPS still boasts an impressive educational pedigree. As their website notes, the class of 2018 has 223 National Merit Semifinalists, and Fairfax County high schools are recognized annually by the Washington Post as some of the most challenging in the United States. Yet as C.S. Lewis warned, “education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil.” Teaching kids just entering puberty about how to “properly” use contraception and engage in safe anal sex can only be classified as a first-rate education in delinquency. Most American public schools have lost sight of Aristotle’s important maxim: “The happy life is regarded as a life in conformity with virtue…not spent in [sexual] amusement.”

Excluding my children from a public education is a hard decision for me, as I would think it is for many families—these are the institutions that have inculcated American ideas and ideals for generations of our citizens. I spent every year of grade school except kindergarten in the same public school district, which had an indelible impact on my socialization into our culture as well as on how I think and view the world. Public school districts also continue to employ huge numbers of our citizens: FCPS is the third largest employer in the state of Virginia. My mother spent more than 30 years in the system as an occupational therapist, from which she herself graduated in 1972. I was so inspired by my public education experience that I worked as a substitute and then a full-time high school history teacher, as well as a high school tennis coach.

Though I am a product of public schools and still take pride in my education, I won’t send my kids there—not as long as I can afford to send them elsewhere. Given the Catholic Church’s robust security policies in the wake of the early 2000s sex scandal, my kids are safer in my parish’s elementary school. My decision will stand until our public school systems—enduring what has become a nationwide sexual crisis—adopt policies that resist, rather than capitulate to, the worrying trends wreaking havoc on our families and our children.

Casey Chalk is a student at the Notre Dame Graduate School of Theology at Christendom College.

Read more from The American Conservative…

DNC’s Keith Ellison says he’s boycotting ‘cowardly’ NFL for making players respect the national anthem

Darn, it appears Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn, is boycotting the NFL over its “cowardly” new policy that requires players to stand for the national anthem or keep their rear-ends in the locker room.

Sundays will never be the same… or, perhaps, they’ll be just fine.

“Friends who know me, know that I love football. But I won’t be watching this NFL season because of the unfair cowardly and idiotic kneeling ban. #BoycottNFL,” the Democratic lawmaker tweeted.

On the same day the league announced a $89 million commitment to social justice programs to combat inequality, team owners agreed to a policy that subjects teams to a fine if a player or any other team personnel do not stand for the anthem. Teams also have the option to fine personnel or players who violate the policy.

The NFL has been rocked with controversy since former player Colin Kaepernick first began kneeling in 2016 o protest racism and police brutality.

(Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

The left responded by saying the new policy is an affront to the First Amendment, never mind that players — see employees — are technically on the clock when they protest.

Anyone surprised the Democrat’s siding with NFL players disrespecting the national anthem over claims of police brutality and racism — statistics beg to differ — haven’t been paying attention in post-Obama America.

And while Ellison, deputy chair of the Democratic National Committee, had lots of support from his progressive fan club, a tweet by a social media user demonstrated what a pickle the NFL created for itself by not taking a firm stance from the jump.

“I’ll continue not to invest my dollars in pampered man children who whine about work conditions at a multi-million dollar job,” the tweet read.

Here’s a sampling of other responses that suggest that of all its problems, Ellison not watching games is the least of the NFL’s concerns.

Read more from BRP – BizPac Review…

THE DOOMSDAY SCENARIO: WHAT IF SCHOOL WALKOUTS DON'T WORK?

The New York Times seemed to think it was bitterly ironic that some of the students at Santa Fe High School, site of the recent mass shooting, had staged a walkout last month in support of the Parkland, Florida, students. But now, only a month later, one of the students who participated in the walkout is in the hospital from yet another school shooting. 

I suppose we could revel in the irony, but, as a more results-oriented person, what I take from that vignette is that school walkouts are not effective deterrents to school shootings. I’m not sure the poems did much either. 

These are hideous events that require serious proposals, not the self-indulgent mawkishness our media keep serving up. 

Here are some news items that might help us figure out how to reduce the number of school shooting victims. 

— May 3, 2017, Arlington, Texas: James Jones went to the Zona Caliente sports bar and began yelling incoherently. When the manager, Cesar Perez, went to talk to him and calm him down, Jones pulled out a gun and shot Perez dead, then started shooting wildly at patrons. Luckily, a concealed carry holder happened to be having dinner at Zona Caliente with his wife that night. He shot Jones dead before anyone else was hurt. 

— Aug. 7, 2016, Linndale, Ohio: Two men getting into their car in a Dollar Store parking lot were held up by a masked armed robber. As the gunman, Varshaun Stephen Dukes, was rifling through one of the men’s pockets, the other pulled out his concealed handgun and told him to stop. The robber fired at the man but missed. The concealed carry permit holder shot back, putting a .45 bullet in the robber’s brain. (Naturally, he survived.) All of this was captured on the Dollar Store’s surveillance camera, so no charges were brought against the armed citizen. 

— June 26, 2016, Lyman, South Carolina: Jody Ray Thompson opened fire in the crowded Playoffz nightclub, injuring three. But before he could kill anyone, he was shot in the leg by a club patron with a concealed carry license. Police arrested Thompson without further incident and no one died.

— May 31, 2015, Conyers, Georgia: After arguing with a liquor store clerk, Jeffrey Scott Pitts returned with a gun and began shooting at everyone in the store, killing two. Todd Scott, who was there to buy a six-pack, returned fire. The crazed gunman fled, went home and shot his parents. “He was very surprised that he was not the only one in the store with a gun,” Scott said. Apart from the two people killed in Pitts’ opening barrage, no one died. Scott saved the lives of everyone else in that store. 

— July 24, 2014, Darby, Pennsylvania: Felon and psychiatric patient Richard Plotts pulled out a gun at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, murdered his caseworker and wounded his psychiatrist, Dr. Lee Silverman. He would have kept shooting — Plotts had 39 more bullets — but the doctor pulled out his own gun and fired back, in violation of the hospital’s no-guns rule. No one else died. 

— Jan. 11, 2014, Portland, Oregon: After being turned away from a strip club in Portland, repeat felon Thomas Elliott Hjelmeland came back, wearing a clown mask, guns blazing. He hit a waitress, a security guard and a patron before a bouncer, concealed carry permit holder Jonathan Baer, returned fire and ended the attack. No one died. 

— Dec. 16, 2012, San Antonio, Texas: Jesus Manuel Garcia began shooting at the Santikos Mayan Palace movie theater from a nearby restaurant and continued shooting as he walked toward the theater. An armed off-duty cop shot Garcia four times, stopping the attack. No one died. 

— March 25, 2018, Boiling Springs, South Carolina: Jesse Gates kicked in a side door of the Southside Freewill Baptist Church during services, raised his gun to shoot — but was grabbed and held at gunpoint by the reverend’s grandson, a concealed carry permit holder. No one was hurt. Spartanburg County Sheriff Chuck Wright said, “I like the fact that a concealed weapons permit holder was prepared to protect the worshipers.” 

It seems like it’s been awhile since we’ve heard of a crazed gunman being quickly disarmed at a school. Maybe because we’ve been trying to stop mass shootings with gun-free school zones. 

Here are some older school shooting cases that had comparatively happy endings. 

— In 2001, 15-year-old Charles Williams tried to shoot up his high school in Santee, California, but luckily, an off-duty cop happened to be bringing his daughter to school that day. He ended Williams’ rampage with his own gun, holding him until more police arrived. Two fatalities. 

— In 1998, a 14-year-old student began shooting up a school dance being held at a restaurant in Edinboro, Pennsylvania. The restaurant owner pulled out a shotgun, keeping the death toll to one. 

— In 1997, a student shot several people at his high school in Pearl, Mississippi, killing two, and was headed to the junior high, until assistant principal Joel Myrick retrieved a .45 pistol from his car and pointed it at the gunman’s head. Another massacre averted. 

— In 1993, student Mark Duong pulled out a gun during his disciplinary hearing at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, wounding three people, including the police officer, who, luckily, had been asked to attend the hearing. The officer immediately shot the psychotic student dead, saving the lives of everyone in the room. 

We can try the walkouts, rallies, moments of silence, media adulation, poems and fist salutes. But if the full arsenal of liberal disapprobation doesn’t stop schizophrenics from going on shooting sprees, concealed carry laws will at least save a lot of lives. 

Read more from Front Page Magazine…

Faculty jobs cut, staff told they are at risk of layoffs at Evergreen State University

Earlier this week I highlighted a piece at the Wall Street Journal which warned layoffs were coming to Evergreen State College. Yesterday, Campus Reform reported that the layoffs have already begun:

John Carmichael, the chief of staff and secretary to the Evergreen State College Board of Trustees, announced in a memo to staff and faculty members on Tuesday that the school has already cut 24 faculty lines and eliminated 19 vacant staff positions, and warned that up to 20 additional staff members could seen be laid off.

“Over the past several days, 20 staff members have been notified that they are at risk for layoff,” Carmichael wrote. “These layoffs, although necessary to stabilize the college’s budget, represent a profound loss felt by many.”

It’s not clear how many of the faculty jobs were already vacant when they were cut. It sounds from this as if the 19 staff positions that were eliminated were already vacant but an additional 20 staff positions that are not vacant could be cut at any time.

“As painful as it is to lose valued colleagues, we know that we must take dramatic steps to stabilize the budget,” Carmichael wrote. “These steps, along with the re-organization of senior leadership positions and fee changes previously announced, will stabilize the budget.”

They don’t actually know that yet. Evergreen announced 2 weeks ago that it was preparing for a 10 percent decline in enrollment next year. Accommodating that decline will require cutting $5.9 million from the budget. But the 10% projection is actually the midpoint of a larger range. Back in February, the school warned the actual decline could be closer to 18 percent. And the WSJ report this week that enrollment for next year is currently down 20%, though the school claims many students choose to enroll at the last minute. All of that to say, Evergreen’s predicament may be significantly worse than the current preparation suggests. I will not be at all surprised if the school goes through another round of deep cuts sometime this summer.

Once the budget is under control, he concluded optimistically, the school will be able to focus on “the critical initiatives that staff and faculty have identified for revitalizing the college by, for instance, identifying paths of study, launching enrollment recovery initiatives, investing in the First-Year experience, modernizing our marketing program, and committing to inclusive excellence and equity for all students.”

Evergreen hasn’t learned anything from last year’s fiasco. So long as President George Bridges is still there, this school is going to continue to struggle. Maybe at some point things will get bad enough that someone will suggest he needs to go but so far the school appears willing to let dozens of other faculty and staff members pay the price for Bridges’ dumb decisions.

One thing that hasn’t gotten cut, at least so far, is the school’s Play Day, where it sets up inflatable bounce houses in Red Square. [h/t Benjamin Boyce]

The post Faculty jobs cut, staff told they are at risk of layoffs at Evergreen State University appeared first on Hot Air.

Read more from Hot Air…

California’s ‘Taxpayer Transparency and Fairness Act’ Resulted in Less Transparency, Fairness for Taxpayers

It’s a rule of thumb. One should always expect the opposite result of whatever any government agency promises. The War on Poverty created a permanent underclass that perpetuated poverty throughout generations. The War on Drugs did much to erode our civil liberties, but mainly has emboldened the drug cartel. The examples go on and on.

That brings us to California’s taxing authorities. After scandals at the Board of Equalization—the Orwellian-named agency that had collected sales, use and special taxes—the Legislature gutted it and largely replaced its functions with two new bureaucracies. The 2017 legislation was called the Taxpayer Transparency and Fairness Act. As you might have guessed, since its implementation a few months ago, the state’s tax proceedings have become less transparent and less fair to taxpayers.

The BOE, which dates back to the second California Constitution in 1879, is the only tax-collection agency in the nation that’s administered by elected officials. It is run by four elected board members plus the state controller. After last year’s law, the four elected officials no longer have much to do even though the board still has a few functions.

As with any elected body, it has for decades been plagued by scandals ranging from allegations of nepotism to accusations of misspending. Governors from both parties have for years tried to gut the agency. Expressing a common sentiment, columnist Dan Walters complained that the “agency has become steadily more politicized, with the board’s four directly elected seats treated as either well-paid sinecures or stepping stones to higher office.” Controversies including elected officials “interfering with pending tax cases” have been going on for decades, he wrote.

Those criticisms have some validity. But isn’t it a good thing that politicians get involved given that they typically intervene to help the taxpayer? There’s no reason that the state couldn’t have audited the agency and implemented reforms. Every agency (even the Legislature itself) has controversies. Instead, the Legislature gutted the board and the results are discouraging.

Let’s look at taxpayer “fairness.” Since the new process has gone into effect, not one of the more than 20 income-tax-appeal cases has gotten a single vote in the taxpayers’ favor. The BOE used to hear 10 to 20 sales- and use- and special-tax appeals at each board meeting, but the new Office of Tax Appeals has yet to hear any of those tax cases. The Legislature hammered the BOE for its backlog, but now it’s worse. The BOE would make a decision the same day by vote. Now it can take up to 100 days while interest and penalties add up.

How about transparency? The old Board of Equalization would televise its hearings and archive them so anyone can view the proceedings. That way everyone, including reporters, can see whether a business is being treated fairly or getting the bureaucratic back of the hand. Those proceedings can also be used if the case ends up in court. The new tax-appeal agency posts transcripts, but has yet to televise or archive the hearings, so it’s no longer fully transparent.

There are many stories of business owners who felt like they were getting a raw deal or being treated in a heavy-handed manner by the board, yet who were able to get help from their elected representative on the BOE. That was a reasonable way to level the playing field.

The Board of Equalization also had the incentive to solve vexing tax-policy problems. For instance, legal marijuana dispensaries are required to pay taxes, but because of federal laws they are not allowed to have bank accounts. But they weren’t typically allowed to haul sacks of cash into BOE offices, either. BOE’s officials worked with the dispensaries to help them safely pay their bills in cash. These practical solutions are more likely to be driven by an elected board with constituents than a bureaucracy with subjects.

The main reason the BOE had been a target is obvious. State officials are tasked with maximizing revenue to assure that tax collections match state spending. Anything that reduces that tax flow is a bad thing, from their perspective. Because elected officials need votes and often have their eyes on higher office, they have an incentive to help taxpayers, which means that sometimes the board would reduce the size of the tax payments.

By the way, the new tax authorities have significantly increased their own administrative budgets from the old BOE days. The Department of Finance gives reasonable explanations for some of the growth (standard increases in pay and benefits, new IT and other start-up costs, artificially deflated final year spending for the BOE as its powers were reduced), but we see the spending trajectory. It’s going up, now that the administrators are in charge.

Bottom line: A reform designed to boost transparency and taxpayer fairness has reduced both of those things. No one should be surprised.

Steven Greenhut is Western region director for the R Street Institute. He was a Register editorial writer from 1998-2009. Write to him at [email protected]. This column was first published in the Orange County Register.

Read more from Reason.com…

Spike in Baton Rouge Killings Renews Concern About Outpacing 2017’s Historic Homicide Rate

After three separate killings in about seven hours during a bloody Sunday in Baton Rouge, residents and law enforcement leaders are hoping to reverse the current trend and avoid another year like 2017 — when East Baton Rouge Parish saw a historic spike in homicides at a rate outpacing Chicago’s.

“I’m surprised and disappointed at this year’s numbers so far,” said Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul. “{snip} We need help from the community to stop this culture of violence in Baton Rouge.”

The parish has seen 35 intentional and unjustified killings since the start of 2018, according to records maintained by The Advocate. That number is nine more than at this time last year when the total stood at 26.

{snip}

The three fatal shootings this weekend brought this month’s homicide tally to 10 — the highest number in one month since December. The Advocate tracks unjustified and intentional killings across East Baton Rouge Parish, but the current numbers could change in the future since some cases are still under investigation and could later be ruled justified or unintentional.

{snip}

“One of the things that stands out to me is that the community is sick and tired of these murders, and because of that they’re providing information to law enforcement,” [Paul] said. “There’s still some fear, but people are cooperating with law enforcement and we’re thankful for that.”

Chief Murphy Paul

{snip}

Paul also said he plans to reallocate department resources, adding homicide detectives and sending patrols into neighborhoods that see the most violent crime. He asked for public input on where and when that presence is most needed.

{snip}

The first killing occurred around 3 p.m. when Arvion Finley, 20, was fatally shot on Gus Young Avenue  — not far from an elementary school and across the street from a community center where dozens of people had gathered to celebrate a child’s birthday. He was pronounced dead on the scene, his body lying near the parking lot of a car wash as detectives canvassed the area and neighbors looked on.

Police arrested Robert Harrell, 40, in Finley’s death. He was booked Sunday night into Parish Prison on counts of second-degree murder, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and illegal use of weapons.

Harrell had texted Finley earlier Sunday and asked him to come by the shop to get some money, according to an affidavit of probable cause filed by Baton Rouge police. And Finley wasn’t the only one: Harrell also texted other shop employees to meet him at the location with “hammers,” which police believe to be slang for a firearm.

Harrell, of 1554 North 47th St., later told police that Finley had been threatening him and showed up at the shop with a gun, according to the affidavit. The man said he was wrestling the gun away from Finley when the weapon went off. That report is “inconsistent” with recordings of the shooting as well as several suspected gunshot wounds in Finley’s back, police wrote.

A witness who called 911 told police he was with Finley all day and did not see him with a firearm.

Robert Harrell

Just hours after Finley’s death, Baton Rouge police again responded to another fatal shooting, this time at the intersection of Main Street and North 17th Street.

Kelvin Howard, 41, was pronounced dead on the scene and another man was taken to the hospital with injuries. Both were shot outside an old bank building in a section of Mid City caught halfway between blight and redevelopment.

Police arrested Deandre Hollins on Monday after he turned himself in. Hollins was booked on counts of second-degree murder, attempted second-degree murder, illegal use of a weapon and aggravated assault.

According to Hollins’ arrest report, he was laughing and joking with the two victims but then became angry. He went to a van, armed himself with a gun and began shooting, police said in an affidavit for arrest warrant. Hollins then fled the scene in the van.

{snip}

DeAndre Hollins

The post Spike in Baton Rouge Killings Renews Concern About Outpacing 2017’s Historic Homicide Rate appeared first on American Renaissance.

Read more from American Renaissance…

Gallup: Percentage of Americans who say they’re LGBT rises for sixth straight year

In 2012, 3.5 percent of the public identified as LGBT. Six years later, 4.5 percent — about an additional three million people — do. Two possible explanations. One: It’s not that there are more LGBT people now than there were 10 years ago, it’s just that they feel more comfortable admitting it. The more accepting the culture seems of gay/trans lifestyles, logically the more gay/trans Americans will own up to having them. Although if that’s the explanation, you’d expect this trend to level off sometime soon-ish.

Two: Whether for reasons of nature or nurture, there really are more LGBT people than there were 10 years ago. Something’s happening.

Which of the two explanations does this graph point to? Old trend: The graying of America. New trend: The gaying of America.

Among the three oldest age groups, the growth in the LGBT population is modest. (It’s actually *declined* among seniors and Boomers, which is … interesting.) Among the youngest, way up and now approaching 10 percent. It’s worth noting here the difference between LGBT and “gay”: These numbers include not just gays and lesbians but transgenders, and transgenders have gained a *lot* of cultural visibility very quickly in the last five years thanks to Caitlyn Jenner, “Orange Is the New Black,” etc. It’s possible that the big gain among the youngest adults is being driven by a disproportionate number of people identifying as trans, which is what you’d expect if some “trans effect” is going to show up here. Someone who’s lived 65 years as a man or a woman isn’t as likely to switch, you would think, as someone who’s 20. But that just forces you back to the threshold question: Are there similar numbers of LGBT in each generation and the young simply feel less cultural pressure not to identify that way, or are the pro-LGBT attitudes of pop culture and corporate America actually encouraging them to “experiment”? Is this just an identification thing or is behavior actually changing?

Gallup published a separate poll today on the nature/nurture debate. Behold:

You won’t be surprised to learn that those who think gay marriage should be legal (which is now at an all-time high across the population, by the way) are way more likely to think being gay is nature rather than nurture while those who don’t think the opposite. Among the first group the split is 88/11 in favor of nature while among the second it’s 11/61 for nurture. The more you believe that someone has no control over which gender they’re attracted to, the more you think it’s only fair that that person should be able to marry someone of either gender. What’s really fascinating about the last graph, though, is that the belief in nature over nurture is rising at the same time that the share of the population that identifies as gay is also rising, especially among youngsters — suggesting that there *is* some sort of nurture component to LGBT identification. The country increasingly favors nature to explain all of this while its behavior suggests the opposite.

Back to the first poll, though. Click and scroll down and you’ll see that Gallup also looked at the changes in the number of LGBT people within separate demographic groups. Would it surprise you to know that women are much more likely to identify that way than men are? Six years ago the numbers were almost identical, with 3.4 percent of men and 3.5 percent of women calling themselves LGBT. Six years later, men are up half a point to 3.9; women are up more than a point and a half to 5.1. The stigma against identifying as gay or bi has relaxed for both groups but there’s no question it’s relaxed more for women. Too bad Gallup didn’t do a split by gender *and* age, as I’m curious to know how much of the big shift among younger adults is being driven by women, specifically. Maybe girls are “experimenting” more in high school and college and that explains the bulk of it.

One more interesting data point: Among races, the group with the largest percentage of LGBT members and the group with the largest gain in LGBT members since 2012 is Hispanics. It could be that that’s a product of a small sample size in the poll. If not, I have no idea what explains it.

The post Gallup: Percentage of Americans who say they’re LGBT rises for sixth straight year appeared first on Hot Air.

Read more from Hot Air…

’60 Minutes’ Journalist: Here’s Why Democrats Think the Press is on Their Side

60 Minutes journalist Lesley Stahl admitted that the press leans liberal and that’s why Democratic politicians believe “reporters are on their side” and thus expect glowing coverage or kid gloves from the mainstream media. During a conversation with PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff at the Deadline Club of New York, Stahl said she was surprised […]

Read more from Accuracy in Media…