Search for missing toddler ends after mother found dead

In a box-office blip that echoed through the multiplexes, “Solo: A Star W… . In this May 17, 2018 photo, McFarland High senior Victoria Sharp works at the food concession and is one of the high school students that acquired one of the coveted jobs at the Maya Cinemas Theate… A Latino movie producer is opening theaters in poor, rural U.S. areas that lack basic entertainment options, giving unserved audiences a chance to dream.

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“Exuberance!” Soars Above Kentucky Children’s Hospital

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can …

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The woman whose allegations that Bill Cosby drugged and assaulted her led to his conviction said the pills he gave her Carbon Career and Technical Institute’s Distributive Education Clubs of America students continued to exceed expectations and make their mark… The cost of housing overflow Schuylkill County prison inmates outside the county has hit $334,619 so far this year.

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Parkland students target midterms with summer gun control road trip

  • School shooting survivors plan 60-day, 20 state bus tour
  • Tour aims to boost youth turnout and discuss gun reform

Student survivors of the Parkland school shooting were announcing on Monday plans to take their March for Our Lives movement on a summer road trip of the United States.

The 60-day, 20-state bus tour will take in stops to meet victims and survivors of other school shootings, including Sante Fe, Texas, where 10 people were killed by a student gunman last month.

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Brother says Parkland school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz pointed rifle at him, mom

RELATED: Judge: Accused Parkland shooter’s brother, Zachary Cruz, allowed to move to Virginia after arrest Zachary Cruz told The Miami Herald in an interview published Thursday both incidents happened months before Nikolas Cruz allegedly killed 14 students …

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Undercover videos prompt N.J. lawmakers’ investigation into teachers’ union

New Jersey lawmakers grilled teachers union officials Thursday, weeks after the release of undercover videos that appeared to show local union representatives bragging about their ability to preserve the jobs of teachers who abuse students or drugs.

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NJEA teachers union blasted by lawmakers over controversial videos

State lawmakers grilled leaders of New Jersey’s largest teachers union Thursday over hidden-camera videos appearing to show local union officials discussing protecting teachers accused of abusing students. They also implored state education officials to …

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Why the Air Force Thinks It Can Turn Gamers Into Its Next Top Guns

In late May, the U.S. Air Force announced its intention to release an advanced video game simulation. The theory is that the game, if successful, will be an effective recruitment tool among high school students.

If this sounds familiar, it’s because the U.S. Army already did the exact same thing with a game called “America’s Army,” launched in 2002. That one was for a while relatively popular, but as a recruitment tool there’s little doubt it failed. Indeed, it was panned early and often for claiming to offer a realistic soldiering experience while glamorizing it as an exciting and largely consequence-free adventure. The game, of course, never showed the tedium or the dark side of military service in conflict—but what proper recruitment propaganda ever does?

Not content to merely copy a failed program, the so-far untitled Air Force game seeks to combine the allure of video games with the Orwellian realities of modern “big data” applications that the government is so fond of. In this case, officials have suggested they are literally going to monitor players to spot particularly talented ones they can recruit.

Call it recruitment recon.

As an example, imagine that the Air Force identifies a player who is particularly good at controlling the game’s simulated planes, so they offer him/her a $100,000 signing bonus to sign up for the real thing. But isn’t it possible that video game talent might not translate into real-life skills in combat? Incredibly, that seems to have been lost on the USAF.

Which is why this could be an even bigger disaster than the “America’s Army” folly—and much more expensive, too. While the Army’s gambit cost millions to design, it at least had a limited return on investment. The Air Force is prepared to throw major bonuses at good video game players on the notion that, like the 1984 movie The Last Starfighter, that’s where you’re going to find real talent.

The reason this makes sense to the Air Force (but nobody else) is because, with the advent of drone operations (i.e. remote control targeting), a number of people actually are employed in joystick-based warfare. It’s not clear whether the game will feature a drone operator mode (based in some outpost in the Nevada desert), as it seems to be focused on advanced warplanes in the heat of battle, not blowing up Pakistani wedding parties from thousands of miles away. This should come as no surprise because the life of an actual drone operator is reportedly pretty miserable, and the point of the Air Force’s game is to get kids to play so you can collect all sorts of data from them.

So far, Air Force officials aren’t providing a lot of specifics, just ambitions. They’ve also avoided estimating what the program will cost. Creating a game advanced enough to reliably attract an audience gets more expensive every year. At this point just developing a game can be counted on to cost a minimum of $100 million, to say nothing of all of the server and metadata processing costs, and the costs associated with marketing the game.

This is precisely why high-end video games don’t attempt to survive as advertising platforms. The cost of developing games has grown precipitously over the years, and players are focused on playing. They don’t want to be sold anything—not by companies, not by Uncle Sam.

This is why using a war simulation video game as a marketing tool is a terrible idea. Even in the highly unlikely event that the U.S. Air Force actually does make a popular video game, that doesn’t mean its fan base is going to be inclined toward military service, let alone suited to it. This is what happens when you combine lofty recruitment goals with a bottomless pit of taxpayer money: the military is encouraged to make reckless attempts to engage the public. The Air Force now appears to be lining up one of the most reckless of blunders yet.

Jason Ditz is news editor at Antiwar.com, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the cause of non-interventionism. His work has appeared in Forbes, the Toronto Star, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, the Providence Journal, the Daily Caller, the American Conservative, the Washington Times, and the Detroit Free Press.

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Gunman Opens Fire In Texas High School, Killing Up To 10

At least one gunman opened fire at a Houston-area high school Friday, killing eight to 10 people, most of them students, authorities said, in the nation’s deadliest such attack since the massacre in Florida that gave rise to a campaign by teens for gun control. Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said he could not be precise about the number of deaths at Santa Fe High School, which went on lockdown around 8 a.m. One person was in custody, and a second person had been detained, he said.

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