Will “Rules and Regulations” Save Us?

Opinion

Open Carry
Personal, individual responsibility will save this civilization. Individual citizens boldly claiming their own magnificence

Ft Collins, CO –-(Ammoland.com)- “America will collapse financially, chasing unceasing rules and regulations designed to save defenseless citizens from harm.” ~ Bin Laden

As a panicked and short-sighted nation, we’re hurriedly composing endless reams of new, confusing, and hopelessly inconvenient “rules” with regard to school security, most of it “theater” and little else

Endless billions of taxpayer dollars are being haphazardly thrown at this issue. More cameras and monitors (that no one is watching), more restrictions on entry and exit, more delays, more confusion, more inconvenience, etc

But wait!

How do we similarly “protect” buses, sports stadiums, playgrounds, day-care centers, parking lots, movie theaters, cruise ships, et al?

With all this growing, high-tech “security” (which is mostly wishful thinking), is anyone really any “safer” than before?

Look at the UK, where cameras have been installed on virtually every single street corner in the entire country, yet where violent crime is at an all-time high, and getting worse by the day.

Bin Laden made a watertight argument.

What will work without fail, and the only strategy that has any chance of working, is: “Individual Security”

Teachers and school officials need to go armed. Citizens need to go armed. “Security” needs to be thought of as an intensely, exclusively personal issue.

The entire false, failed philosophy of “Learned Helplessness,” endlessly promoted by leftists, needs to be majestically, audaciously thrown in the trash.

“Institutional Security” is a contraction of terms.

Personal, individual responsibility will save this civilization. Individual citizens boldly claiming their own magnificence.

That will save us. Nothing else will!

/John

Defense Training International, Inc

About John Farnam & Defense Training International, Inc
As a defensive weapons and tactics instructor John Farnam will urge you, based on your own beliefs, to make up your mind in advance as to what you would do when faced with an imminent lethal threat. You should, of course, also decide what preparations you should make in advance if any. Defense Training International wants to make sure that their students fully understand the physical, legal, psychological, and societal consequences of their actions or in-actions.

It is our duty to make you aware of certain unpleasant physical realities intrinsic to the Planet Earth. Mr. Farnam is happy to be your counselor and advisor. Visit: www.defense-training.com

The post Will “Rules and Regulations” Save Us? appeared first on AmmoLand.com.

Read more from AmmoLand…

Psychedelics & Danger

I am taken aback by the Christian readers who think that my speculations this week about Michael Pollan, psychedelic drugs, and what those drugs might be telling us about the nature of consciousness and reality, amount to me encouraging people to experiment with them.

I do not encourage that at all! I don’t encourage it because I have a strong sense that those drugs put one into a state of consciousness in which one’s psyche is more receptive and vulnerable to spiritual entities and forces that are actually there. I believe Michael Pollan’s interview subjects who said that good things happened to them on their psychedelic trips. I also take seriously this experienced guy, whose final acid trip went very badly:

These spirits looked much like the strange animals and creatures
depicted in occult books and dungeons and dragons monster manuals.

As intense as this was I was not afraid. Instead it was as much
a feeling of incredible power and evil and I could stand and it was exhilerating. It was then that Keely buried herself beneath a blanket and began screaming ‘I can see the demons around you!’ and I laughed. I was breathing them into the room and my friends were sharing this experience. With a tremendous intensity I summoned up a great figure who’s outline I could make out. This figure was standing in a circle and there was a gateway behind it. I could see a three headed dog and other smaller demonic creatures behind the great figure but it was forcing those creatures back through the gateway as they tried to escape into the house.

The figure itself was immensely beautiful. It was so evil yet so compellingly elegant and beautiful. It was wingless but it had horns and I could make out the facial features of its eyes and nose mouth and limbs although they were but an outline.

Pulsing within this great demon were all of the other spirits that combined collectively as a part of him. Where we would have veins and bone and muscle tissue, the angel of darkness had spirits that gleefully flowed throughout his frame. It was extremely intense. As he moved, the spirits that were making up his internals would constantly change form flicking from one shape to the next in an endless display of transformation.

More:

 As the monstorous form turned to me I was compelled to one knee. At this point my friends were watching intently. moments later though Keely had to watch off and on because she was so frightened she was trying to shut the site out by closing her eyes. Jon was nowhere to be found. Apparently he had left. The demon turned to me and outstretched his hand and flexed with great might as a display of power. His face flew off toward me and through me and this continued for a split second but it felt like hours. Gradually his form diminished as the ember from the incense stick burned out and the smoke was sucked out up the chimney of the fireplace. One by one each of the spirits traveled their way from where the demon form was standing and flew up the chimney. This was the last time I ever did acid.

It was incredible. It was intense. It has led me to the belief that acid is a gateway drug which can allow you to see into other planes of existance that run in parallel as our own, just at a different speed. I don’t know whether this was a mass visualization (3 people saw it including myself) or just a very intense hallucination from a mega dose of LSD and hash but it doesn’t matter to me. If my mind is capable of being that creative to be able to visualize something that intense (no artist could ever paint this.) I doubt it. I believe it was real. I believe and I will never see things the same way again.

Misspellings in the original. That appeared on the pro-psychedelic site Erowid.org.

Here’s an account from the Sydney Morning Herald about a teenager who had an experience with LSD that caused him nearly to kill himself. Excerpt:

At the fund-raising dinner which his parents are attending, Karl is perplexed when his phone begins to vibrate during a speech. Jasmine also grabs her phone, which is lighting up with messages from five different neighbours asking her to call them immediately. The couple hurriedly excuse themselves before Jasmine calls a trusted friend. “Tom’s all right,” she’s told. “But you need to go straight to the hospital.” On arrival around midnight, they’re greeted by a sight that haunts all parents: their teenage son unconscious in a hospital bed, covered in dried blood, with plastic tubes snaking out of his mouth and nose.

The outlines of this troubling story were sketched by Jasmine, who emailed me after reading a Good Weekend story of mine from June 3, in which I described my own (largely positive) experience with LSD. “LSD is like a monster in our house, sucking all the potential and opportunity out of my beautiful son… as well as creating massive stress for the entire family,” Jasmine wrote. “Let me tell you from my experience (and by the way, I am no LSD virgin), that for our precious kids, LSD is plain playing with fire. They can’t evaluate the high levels of risk versus the perceived mind ‘expanding’ benefits, and they are basically ending up, for want of a better word, completely f…ed.”

I believe that psychedelics ought to be studied for their possible therapeutic use. Pollan, whose book is now #1 on the New York Times list, discusses in depth the promise this class of drugs shows for depressed people, addicts, and others. I also believe that we should seriously consider what these drugs tell us about consciousness. But I also believe it’s playing with fire, and not a risk worth taking in most cases.

I have been reading other philosophical articles about psychedelics and the occult, written not by Christians, but by people who encourage the drugs’ use as a gateway to occult knowledge. I’m not going to post links. One I’ve just read is especially fascinating, because it’s about an academic who studies this stuff, and whose group of writers and academics sees the new interest in psychedelics as heralding a final smash-up of the Enlightenment. Their general model metaphysics and consciousness is surprisingly close to pre-modern Christianity’s … but it is occult. Again, I don’t want to post a link, but the Christianity of a medieval like Dante Alighieri, or of a contemporary Orthodox monk on Mount Athos, has a lot more in common with this way of seeing the world than it does, at least superficially, with average suburban 21st century Christianity.

Except a Dante or a St. Paisios the Athonite would clearly see the demonic element in this philosophy. The piece I just read, with its description of existence as an organic whole, direct experience of God, and so forth — it’s all there in pre-modern Christianity. It’s easy for me to see why bored and restless Westerners who think Christianity is about nothing more than dry propositions and moralism, would turn to psychedelics as spiritual seekers. If that’s you, I strongly encourage you to read The Mountain of Silence, an account of a modern-day Athonite monk who explains Orthodox Christian spirituality to the author, American professor Kyriacos Markides.

Markides is a sociologist of religion. As he writes in the introduction (which you can read on the “Look Inside” feature of that Kindle link), he lost his belief in agnosticism and philosophical materialism through his academic study of shamanistic and esoteric religious figures. He says that he explored Eastern religious traditions for years. He assumed that Christianity was withering away because it ignored the spiritual, mystical aspect of human experience. Then a friend on his native Cyprus told him he should go meet and study the holy men of his native spiritual tradition, Eastern Orthodoxy. Many of the things he found appealing about non-Christian spiritual paths were there preserved in Orthodoxy, from the first millennium of the Christian faith.

It’s an absolutely fascinating book, very readable for the ordinary reader. The lesson I take from it is that the people who turn to psychedelics in search of mystical experience aren’t necessarily wrong to want a non-cerebral encounter with the divine, but they are risking far too much, spiritually and otherwise, to approach it pharmaceutically, and outside the bounds of established Christian tradition. You’ll find in Orthodoxy that the monks who are the most spiritually experienced are very strong in cautioning spiritual beginners not to seek too much, too fast.

I need to find a way to write a book about what Orthodox spirituality offers to seekers after mysticism, as a truthful and holy alternative to the spiritual and mental dangers of these alternative traditions. E-mail me with your ideas. I’ll be thinking hard about this all weekend.

Read more from The American Conservative…

Royal Oak High School students camp in cardboard boxes to raise money for homeless shelter

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – Some Royal Oak High School students are starting off the holiday weekend by camping in cardboard boxes to raise funds and awareness about homelessness. More than 30 students from the school’s Interact Club built a “box city” at Royal Oak …

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PBS Lets Vets Themselves Describe Life Inside the War Machine

'Going to War'Going to War. PBS. Monday, May 28, 9 p.m.

Served Like a Girl. PBS. Monday, May 28, 10 p.m.

So, an easy solution to the problem of Adderall abuse: It’s called “Afghanistan.”

“I think it’s hilarious that in America now, we have this big thing about medications and being present and all this other kind of stuff,” says a military veteran in PBS’ Going to War. “Because you’re never more present than you are in wars. Soldiers have figured this out eons ago. You have to be present to get shot at. I guarantee you are locked in.”

Going to War, produced by veteran documentarian Michael Epstein (LennoNYC) and spearheaded by commentary from war correspondent Sebastian Junger (Restrepo) and Vietnam veteran and author Karl Marlantes (What It Is Like to Go to War), is a collection of interviews with vets of U.S. wars over the past 60 years, plumbing their feelings about what to many was the most significant experience of their lives.

PBS has packaged it on Memorial Day with the peculiar but ultimately endearing tale of women back from the front, Served Like a Girl, the first directorial effort by filmmaker Lysa Heslov, airing as an episode of the Independent Lens series.

The relationship between soldiers and war is never as simple as outsiders make it out to be. Some certainly hate it. But others find a human resonance in war that otherwise eludes them: A sense of purpose, of brotherhood and even, paradoxically, of security. One vet interviewed in Going to War recalls that he felt safer in Vietnam, where “you know somebody’s got your back. In the world, it’s dog eat dog.”

That is, arguably, not a typical human response. But one of the most interesting things about the documentary is the frank admission of the soldiers—both male and female—is that they aren’t typically human, or at least weren’t when they were in the military. Going to war would be impossible, they say, if the military didn’t strip them of ordinary human sensibilities and rebuild them as a hive mind.

The whole point of basic training is aimed at obliterating any sense of individuality. “The ego, it has to go,” says one vet. When that’s accomplished, drill instructors begin levying collective punishments: If one soldier’s bunk isn’t made right, his whole unit has to do punishment marches. By the end, the vets say note approvingly, all notions of personal survivability have been erased. “The moment you have self-preserving thoughts,” says one, “everything’s going to hell.”

The near universality of the experience emerges in a segment of Going to War in which vets from different units, wars and decades are all asked the same questions and their answers edited together in a stream-of-conciousness rap. First thought upon entering a war zone: “What the hell am I doing?” Second: “What’s wrong with those guys I’m replacing?” says one. “Zoned-out zombies, a mean hard look on their face.” The third, at the sound of the first bullets: “My God, we’re being shot at.”

Within the common framework, of course, the soldiers have individual stories. One of the most chilling comes from Al Grantham, who quit his bricklaying job in Alabama to join the Marines and fight in Vietnam. Knocked senseless by a North Vietnamese bullet during the battle of Hue, he was loaded onto a stack of casualties on the back of a tank and hauled outside the city. It wasn’t until he heard a medic shout, “Hey, this one’s not dead yet”—Grantham’s first thought was, “that poor sumbitch must be hurt bad”—that he realized the rest of the passengers on the tank were corpses and the poor sumbitch was him.

Yet the thinness and easy erasability of the line between life and death were not, for many of the vets, the most frightening discovery. It was the realization that they were, in some fundamental way, broken. “You’re tired of being tired, you’re scared of being scared,” remembers one.

And a former Marine describes with agonizing calm a day in Iraq when six car-bombs exploded in 15 minutes around his unit’s urban position. When the explosions finally stopped, all that could be heard were the shrills of Iraqi women cradling their dead. The Marine officer, trying to count his men and plot his next move, could barely hear himself think. “Maybe, he wondered idly, “I could kill them to shut them up.” His next shocked thought: “What am I capable of? … My God-given conscience is not going to stop me from doing these things.”

Served Like a Girl, in the early going, seems almost whimsical by comparison. It follows the contestants in the Ms. Veteran America beauty pageant, which raises money to support homeless vets.

They seem, mostly, an ordinary collection of female twentysomethings with only the occasional crackpot loose end—notably the contestant whose mother’s nipple was pecked off by a chicken. (“He had my nipple and I had his butt,” she declares without rancor.) Backstage at the pageant, much of their conversation consists of which self-administered sex toys best stand up to the rigors of desert warfare.

But as the film continues, the scars left by their combat tours start to be revealed: Broken marriages and child-custody fights. Macabre nightmares. Crippling guilt that they walked away from an IED explosion and their companions didn’t. Not all the scars are emotional. It’s not until about a third of the way through Served Like a Girl that you realized that one principal character is missing her legs. The Miss America pageant will never look quite the same to me again.

Read more from Reason.com…

Forbes Spread a Lie About an Influential Housing Report and Made Seattleites Stupider

The business news site Forbes.com yesterday published a column by Roger Valdez, a local lobbyist, claiming Seattle City Council members cited data from a “report that never existed” while debating a head tax to fund housing and homelessness services. The report in question, which exists and is labeled “final report,” was produced in December 2017 by the consulting firm McKinsey and Company in partnership with the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

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Alioto Says Her Past ‘Housing First’ Plan Would End Homelessness

She claims that, much to her chagrin, the late Mayor Ed Lee subsequently let the plan wither before cannibalizing its resources to, among other ends, shunt money away from housing for the homeless into housing for the general population. “The 10-year …

Read more from Mayor Ed Lee…

What explains this incredible bubble?

Dear reader,

Our May issue was all about the state of education in America…

And today, we bring you an essay that we couldn’t fit in the magazine… It’s the “missing chapter” that explains the history and rationale behind the incredible rise in student-loan debt.

Read on for more…

Good Intentions and Fiscal Recklessness

By Bryan Beach, financial analyst

Over the past 10 years, students (most of whom have virtually no income) have racked up enormous debts. As of 2017, student debt totals more than $1.5 trillion – the second-largest source of household debt after home mortgages.

Incredibly, that’s what our entire federal government owed a little more than 30 years ago. Virtually all this money was borrowed in only the last 10 years.

The average college student graduates with more than $30,000 in debt… and by his late twenties, has racked up more than $6,000 in credit-card debt. Meanwhile, median earnings for Americans aged 25-34 are $36,000-$40,000.

Can you imagine starting out your adult life with a personal debt-to-income level at close to 100%? What does this say about the state of our economy? What does this say about the state of our culture?

All the signs show that the debt piled on our youth will become another catastrophic bubble in the American economy.

This expansion had nothing to do with real supply and demand or the creation of value. Instead, it was simply an outgrowth of the government’s good intentions and fiscal recklessness…

The government first got into the student-loan business in the late 1950s. President Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower decided the U.S. needed to mint a lot of new engineers and scientists to catch up with the Soviet Union’s first successful efforts in space. So the federal government began providing low-interest-rate college loans to America’s best and brightest…

Then in 1965, Lyndon Johnson changed the focus from national defense to social welfare. As part of the “Great Society” initiatives, the new Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) gave loans to low-income students.

More important, Johnson changed the way the government financed the loans. Instead of loaning students money directly, FFELP loans would be made by banks… but the government would still pick up the tab on defaults. That created an environment where banks could recklessly lend, without any risk of default.

In 1972, Richard Nixon and Congress created the Student Loan Marketing Association (better known as “Sallie Mae”) to service these debts. In 1984, its shares began trading on the New York Stock Exchange. Ultimately, Sallie Mae “privatized,” formally cutting its ties with the U.S. government. As we’ll show you, no entity would profit more from Johnson’s gravy train.

Student loans grew steadily and – for the most part – slowly, until around 1992, when the U.S. Congress decided to include for-profit institutions in the official definition of “institution of higher learning.” Suddenly, “for-profit” colleges were eligible to receive financial aid. Two years later, the for-profit University of Phoenix went public… backed by Wall Street’s money.

By 2000, for-profits were spending tens of millions of dollars lobbying in Washington, and the government began encouraging more citizens to pursue higher education.

How Lenders Can Exploit a Broken System

As the 2007-2008 mortgage crisis showed… when you shield lenders and borrowers from the consequences of reckless behavior, they act recklessly. This is the definition of “moral hazard.”

And as you’ll see, the student-loan program has become one vast moral hazard…

For years, Sallie Mae’s business model churned out mountains of cash. It was impossible not to. Sallie Mae got to borrow from government agencies at miniscule rates, loan it to borrowers for high rates… and if the deal went bad, the taxpayers were on the hook.

Starting in the 1990s, politicians began pressing to eliminate the system’s moral hazard by going back to the Sputnik-era direct-loan system. But Sallie Mae and the for-profit colleges were a powerful lobbying force and fended off legislative changes for nearly 15 years.

By 2010, the gig was up. As part of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, Congress established that the only entity able to issue government-backed loans would be the U.S. government. That meant Sallie Mae could no longer originate loans backed by the U.S. government. Its gravy train had ended.

To fill the void left by originating FFELP loans, Sallie Mae turned up the heat on another revenue stream – servicing loans held by others. Uncle Sam doesn’t want to be bothered with actually collecting payments. Sallie Mae was happy to do that for a fee.

Sallie Mae quickly recognized that collecting payments on active accounts was a lousy, low-margin business. To really make money in the servicing business, you had to collect delinquent accounts.

This created a new moral hazard… Sallie Mae had no incentive to keep loans current. So it treated the borrowers like dirt. According to various filed and settled claims, Sallie Mae employees intentionally sent confusing or misleading correspondence. They neglected to tell borrowers about loan relief they were entitled to. They called them dozens of times, day and night.

The company’s “bad cop” tactics infuriated borrowers, often making them even less likely to pay. This played right into Sallie Mae’s hands. Once a borrower moved from the “small fee” service-revenue bucket to the “fat percentage” delinquency bucket… Sallie Mae turned on the charm. It brought in its “good cops,” who cooperated with the customers and collected the cash.

It worked. Sallie Mae regularly generated $300 million-$500 million a year in “Contingency Revenue.”

The Tide Turns Against Sallie Mae

Eventually, Sallie Mae’s tactics caught up with it. Frustrated constituents began writing their congressmen. Various media outlets reported on Sallie Mae’s deplorable customer-satisfaction statistics. Thousands of people followed the “I HATE SALLIE MAE” Facebook page. Finally, when it became news that the company had specifically targeted 78,000 military servicemen with its predatory practices… Sallie Mae was officially in Washington’s crosshairs.

The government passed various measures – primarily from 2007-2013 – to ease the borrowers’ burden, including:

  • Allowing students to put off payments if they attend graduate school.
  • Capping the exorbitant “Contingency Fee” plan.
  • Holding servicers accountable for how they treated customers.
  • Implementing “Income-Based Repayment” (“IBR”) and “Pay as You Earn” plans, which cap payments at a percentage of disposable income… or allow borrowers at a certain income level to cease payments altogether. Often, any balances not repaid after 20 years will be forgiven.
  • Allowing graduate students to essentially borrow unlimited amounts under various federal programs (in contrast to capped undergraduate loans).
  • Creating a “not-for-profit loophole,” which forgives the entire outstanding balance after 10 years for any graduate student who becomes a teacher, public defender, or works at a not-for-profit organization.

As always… the government’s best intentions simply gave borrowers license to act recklessly. It shifted the “moral hazard” from the lenders to the borrowers.

Take Bonnie Kurowski-Alicea, a chronic borrower who managed to run up a $209,000 tab earning a doctorate from Capella University in “Industrial Organizational Psychology.” Bonnie couldn’t find a job after earning her online undergraduate degree, so she compounded the problem by piling one useless degree on top of the other. As the Wall Street Journal pointed out, “Dr.” Kurowski-Alicea’s main motivation for earning master’s and doctorate degrees was to postpone repaying her student loans. Her unemployed husband has $75,000 of student loans himself.

Then there’s Virginia Murphy. Her tuition at Tulane Law School was nearly $150,000, and she racked up federal loans of around $250,000 to take care of living expenses. According to the Wall Street Journal, Murphy never had any intention of paying the money back. Loan forgiveness was “the only reason (she) even considered” going to law school. Thanks to the IBR program, Murphy’s monthly payment doesn’t even cover the interest… which means her outstanding balance actually increases every month. As a public defender, her loan balance will be forgiven after 10 years… at which point the outstanding balance will have ballooned to more than $300,000.

The “not-for-profit loophole” was intended for folks like Murphy who, by serving the community as a public defender, is presumably forgoing more lucrative opportunities in the private sector.

But most of the forgiven “not-for-profit” loans will benefit doctors and surgeons. People like Emily Van Kirk and her husband, who managed to rack up $700,000 of debt while attending medical school in St. Maarten. Much of this balance will be forgiven as – like a lot of doctors – the couple plans on working in hospitals. (Uncle Sam must have forgotten that almost 80% of hospitals are “not for profit”… leaving a loophole a mile wide for some of the workforce’s highest wage-earners.)

Many student loans went to honest people who plan on paying back every penny they borrowed.

But some… an awful lot, in fact… had no such plan. Hundreds of billions of dollars in student debt is out there that won’t be or can’t be repaid. And the result is going to be a disaster.

Regards,

Bryan Beach

***

 

If you’re interested in reading more about America’s debt bubble, we recommend the new book, The American Jubilee

Massive amounts of debt have been piled on the weakest in our society. The poor – and especially the young and poor in our country – have no hope of being able to afford the American dream anymore.

When this bubble breaks, it will be an entire generation of young Americans who will suffer.

And it’s not just the size of Americans’ debts that’s the problem… It’s who owes the money that’s the bigger concern. When the rich get in trouble with debt, it’s an economic problem. But when the poor and middle class get in trouble with debt, it’s a political problem.

That’s what makes a national “Debt Jubilee” inevitable. To read more about this problem, click here.

Now on to the latest news…

Far more Americans are having trouble “keeping up” than you realize…

Exclusive: 40% in U.S. can’t afford middle-class basics

At a time of rock-bottom joblessness, high corporate profits, and a booming stock market, more than 40% of U.S. households cannot pay the basics of a middle-class lifestyle.

A fantastic read from American Consequences contributor Matt Labash about writer and reporter Charlie LeDuff in Detroit…

A Little Bit of Real People

“I got love for people,” he says without guile, not a pronouncement you hear generally misanthropic reporters make every day. Charlie saw the Hole getting deeper – more and more falling prey to the effects of corporate greed, government neglect, or personal dissolution.

In the meantime, the New Yorker is reporting on rich folks eating gilded food…

Twenty-Four-Karat Chicken Wings and the Allure of Eating Gold

The whole point of eating Ainsworth’s wings (or the gold-leaf donut that was once sold in Brooklyn, or the maki roll dressed in gilded nori in Tokyo), by contrast, is the languid extravagance of destroying value.Robert Shiller warns on cryptocurrencies with a look back at the rise of “time money” in the 1800s…

The Old Allure of New Money

New ideas for money seem to go with the territory of revolution, accompanied by a compelling, easily understood narrative…Infighting and disorganization inside a left-leaning grassroots group… 

Bernie’s army in disarray

‘Our Revolution’ has shown no ability to tip a major Democratic election in its favor — despite possessing Sanders’ email list, the envy of the Democratic Party — and can claim no major wins in 2018 as its own.

 

Read our latest issues of American Consequences by clicking here.

And let us know what you’re reading at [email protected].

Regards,

Steven Longenecker
With P.J. O’Rourke and the American Consequences Editorial Staff
May 23, 2018

Read more from American Consequences…

Navy vet Dave Bray releases storyteller album with powerful messages

U.S. Navy veteran Dave Bray just released his new album, “Music on a Mission,” and it’s a first-of-its-kind storyteller album that he hopes will garner a lot of attention. It has already debuted in the No. 6 spot on iTunes.

“I proudly sing and speak out about, God and Country, Patriotism and Respect, and the problems with our Nation,” Bray recently told American Military News. “I decided to narrate the record so that the listener completely understands the meaning and importance of each of the songs. I tell stories about the selflessness and sacrifice of our Nation’s Heroes.”

“Music on a Mission” (Courtesy of Dave Bray)

“I talk about the history of the songs and discuss the epidemic of Godlessness that is blanketing our country. I speak about our youth and shed light and warning on the PC narrative that is being shoved down their throats,” Bray continued. “It is a listening experience truly unlike any other. It will draw you in mentally and emotionally, and give you goosebumps. Only until you listen will you truly understand the importance of ‘Music on a Mission.’”

Bray is known to his fans as the “rock ‘n’ roll patriot.”

He served as a Corpsman with the 2nd Battalion/2nd Marines.

Bray was also one of the original members of Madison Rising, a patriotic post-grunge and hard rock band.

One of the songs on “Music on a Mission” is the anthem called “Last Call,” which is dedicated to all fallen police officers.

Bray has performed “Last Call” at various remembrance ceremonies and funerals of fallen police officers.

Of his new album, Bray said he wanted to create something people would like and be impacted by.

“Music on a Mission” (Courtesy of Dave Bray)

“It’s an hour of really entertaining talk radio mixed with some absolutely amazing songs,” he pointed out.

“The music is like something you would hear on a movie soundtrack. The kind of songs that give you goosebumps, fill you with pride or tear at your heart,” Bray continued.

“There is a war going on in this country that no one is willing to fight. It is the war for the minds of our children,” he said. “I used ‘Music on a Mission’ as an opportunity to speak directly to our citizens, both young and old, about the current state of America and what we are leaving behind for our youth. This album is extremely relevant to the times in which we live.”

Bray said all the songs on “Music on a Mission” directly correlate to the daily battles of law enforcement, firefighters, veterans, the U.S. military and faith.

The album is “all about being a God-fearing, freedom-loving, flag-waving patriot,” Bray added. “It’s about standing up for what’s right. So don’t just show the next generation how to stand up. Teach them what it means to be an upstanding citizen.”

The album is currently available on iTunes and Amazon, and also on Bray’s website.

Read more from American Military News…

Op-Ed Thinks Founding Fathers Would Support Gun Control Because Of Dead Kids

The Constitution of the United States of America is the most important document in the country. It lays the groundwork for our entire system of government, protects our natural rights as human beings, and sets limits on what the government can do. When you look at the history immediately proceeding its adoption, everything makes perfect sense.

After all, they’d just fought a war to get away from what they saw as a tyrannical government that wasn’t accountable to the people. They damn sure didn’t want to replicate those mistakes in their new country.

Yet now, a couple of centuries later, we find ourselves constantly battling against people who think they know more about what the Founding Fathers thought and felt despite their explicit writings.

Some of those people write opinion pieces for USA Today.

mid all we know about the Founding Fathers, two things stand out in the wake of yet another mass shooting that underscores the desperate need for action and the depth of our paralysis.

The first is that nearly a third of the 39 delegates who signed the Constitution endured the tragedy of losing children. By one count, 24 sons and daughters born to a dozen signers died before adulthood. The second is that these and the other Founders were among the greatest change-makers in history. They were America’s first #Resist movement, and they fought an actual war to create a future unbound by the past.

Does anyone think they would expect us to live by a 230-year-old document? Would they stand by, reciting the centuries-old Second Amendment, if their own children were endangered — in school, at malls, in movie theaters, on city streets — by easy access to guns? Or would they start us on the road to universal background checks, mandatory waiting periods and other steps most Americans say they want?

Well, they probably would. You see, they believed in personal freedom. I don’t see why they would jump in favor of gun control just because some writer thinks they would.

After all, many gun rights advocates have children, myself included. If we’re not convinced there’s this serious threat to our children’s safety, why would the Founding Fathers, many of whom took libertarianism to a radical extreme?

The op-ed continues:

John Adams probably would have understood as well. He was away in 1776 when his wife, Abigail, unilaterally decided to have a doctor inject her and their four children with live smallpox virus. The inoculation was controversial and dangerous, but not as dangerous as contracting smallpox. Abigail’s bet paid off: Her whole family (including John, who had been immunized in 1764), survived the smallpox epidemic then ravaging the Boston area.

Does anyone doubt that this woman would be marching and lobbying if she were with us now and feared for her children?

You see, this is all predicated on the idea that because people lost kids, they’d support any measure that claims to protect children. The assumption is asinine.

It’s asinine because it essentially believes that those who oppose gun control actually want dead kids. It’s their own warped delusion based on nothing but their narcissistic belief that theirs is the only path to righteousness. They refuse to accept that anyone who disagrees with them could possibly do so simply because they think anything other than the worst imaginable.

In this case, the writer is arguing that our Founding Fathers would support gun control because they lost kids. She’s oblivious to the fact that there are gun rights advocates who have lost children to disease, accident, and even a few to mass shootings, I’m sure.

As a parent, I fear for my children too. I fear a lot of things for them.

Mostly, I fear that some anti-gun zealot will get their way and my children will be defenseless against an attacker who isn’t following the damn rules in the first place when it comes to firearms and, because of those anti-gun zealots, there’s no one else able to defend them either. That’s why we want to see teachers opt to be armed while they’re at work. That’s why I want to see more school resource officers in our schools.

To pretend that gun control is the only path toward keeping our kids safe is ridiculous, as is the notion that our Founding Fathers would have supported something when, clearly, they didn’t.

 

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