De Blasio Wants to Scrap Admissions Testing for Elite High Schools

Mayor de Blasio unveiled a plan Saturday to boost black and Latino enrollment at the city’s eight specialized high schools — and he wants to scrap admissions tests outright.

In an op-ed for education-news site Chalkbeat, de Blasio announced that 20 percent of seats at those eight schools would be reserved for low-income applicants.

Kids in the Department of Education’s Discovery Program who score just below the admissions cut-off would be given one of those saved seats, according to the plan.

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“The Specialized High School Admissions Test isn’t just flawed — it’s a roadblock to justice, progress and academic excellence,” he wrote. {snip}

“With these reforms, we expect our premier public high schools to start looking like New York City,” he wrote. “Approximately 45 percent of students would be Latino or black.”

Under the current system, Asian kids predominate at the city’s top high schools. They make up 74 percent of the population at Stuyvesant, 66 percent at Bronx Science and 61 percent at Brooklyn Tech. At Queens HS for Science at York College, 82 percent are Asian.

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De Blasio has attributed racial disparities to the accessibility of test-prep classes and tutors to economically advantaged families.

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But Brooklyn Tech Alumni President Larry Cary has said, “The solution isn’t to kill the test. It’s to improve the quality of education offered in African-American and Latino communities.”

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At least 60 percent of kids at three of the specialized schools are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, according to DOE data.

The post De Blasio Wants to Scrap Admissions Testing for Elite High Schools appeared first on American Renaissance.

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Of Morality And Marshmallows

The Atlantic reports on a new study suggesting that the famous “marshmallow test” is unreliable as a predictor of future economic instability. Excerpt:

In the case of this new study, specifically, the failure to confirm old assumptions pointed to an important truth: that circumstances matter more in shaping children’s lives than Mischel and his colleagues seemed to appreciate.

This new paper found that among kids whose mothers had a college degree, those who waited for a second marshmallow did no better in the long run—in terms of standardized test scores and mothers’ reports of their children’s behavior—than those who dug right in. Similarly, among kids whose mothers did not have college degrees, those who waited did no better than those who gave in to temptation, once other factors like household income and the child’s home environment at age 3 (evaluated according to a standard research measure that notes, for instance, the number of books that researchers observed in the home and how responsive mothers were to their children in the researchers’ presence) were taken into account. For those kids, self-control alone couldn’t overcome economic and social disadvantages.

The failed replication of the marshmallow test does more than just debunk the earlier notion; it suggests other possible explanations for why poorer kids would be less motivated to wait for that second marshmallow. For them, daily life holds fewer guarantees: There might be food in the pantry today, but there might not be tomorrow, so there is a risk that comes with waiting. And even if their parents promise to buy more of a certain food, sometimes that promise gets broken out of financial necessity.

Maybe so. But might it also be the case that children raised in more affluent homes will have been taught the value of resisting their impulses? I say this because one of my own children has had a very demanding sweet tooth from earliest childhood. He is also impulsive by nature. It has taken years of effort on the part of his mother and me to train him to say no to his impulses — not only for sugar, but, as he has gotten older and started earning spending money, his enthusiasms for buying things that strike his fancy. Many times I have pondered the difficulty he is going to have managing his money if he doesn’t get this impulsiveness under control. He’s a very good kid, highly moral and responsible, but impulsiveness is his Achilles’ heel.

He’s not being raised in poverty. We are middle class people, but culturally I guess that puts us with more in common with the affluent than not. Our impulsive child has been raised in a stable household — materially and emotionally — so there are no environmental factors that nurture his impulsiveness. From an Orthodox Christian point of view, this is simply one of his passions, something he has to struggle against. I have my own particular passions (anger and gluttony). Orthodoxy teaches that life itself is a struggle to crucify the passions and order ones desires towards the will of God. There is nothing wrong in principle with wanting to eat a marshmallow, but if your reason and your will are overcome by that desire to eat a marshmallow, you are weak, and can fall into sin. The regular fasting that Orthodox Christians do is designed to train the will to desire what God desires for us, not what we desire for ourselves.

Anyway, all of that is prelude to what I want to tell you. Last night, I was at a dinner party with some friends. One of them, N., told a long story about a local carpenter she and her husband had hired to do some renovations on their house. I won’t tell the story in depth, because the story is hers to tell, and she’s a writer. The gist of the story is that N. and her husband have been working with this guy for a long time — it’s a big project — and have gotten to know him well. He’s working class, and economically quite precarious. N. said the man has become a friend, and that she and her husband have been working hard to help him stabilize his life.

N. said — again, I’m summing up, but the details are sort of breathtaking — that the carpenter’s personal life is a study in chaos. He cannot grasp that he has the power to determine future events by the choices he makes today. A sense of moral agency totally escapes him. He sees N.’s ordinary family — they have kids — and thinks that they are simply one of fate’s winners. N. talked about the extraordinary lengths she and her husband have gone to befriend and to help this man, but how ultimately it has been futile. No matter what they say to him, no matter what they do for him, he cannot get it together. And he is leaving all kinds of chaos in his wake (several wives, kids, etc.).

I told N. that my wife and I have been in the very same situation, trying to help someone just like that who had become a friend … and in the end, concluding that it was futile. I wrote about it in the past on this blog: how I had gone to my lawyer, offering to pay him to represent this impoverished friend in a particular case. Lawyer said he would take my money and meet with the friend, but that in his lengthy experience with these cases, he could tell me that I’d be wasting my money and his time, because my friend would not follow through. It’s in the nature of people who get themselves into these kinds of situations, he said, to keep doing what got them into that situation in the first place. I told him I would be willing to take that chance to help her.

Next time I saw this friend, I told her to make an appointment with Lawyer X., that he would be willing to advise her, and that I would pay the bill. She thanked me profusely, but said that wouldn’t be necessary that she had decided to … well, that she had decided to keep doing the same stupid thing that got her into this bind in the first place. The country lawyer’s practical experience in dealing with the poor was wiser than my heart-on-the-sleeve idealism. Not for the first time did I feel like a character in a Flannery O’Connor story. (My future epitaph: “Call me Azzberry”.)

At dinner last night, my friend and I dwelled on the intractability of human nature in cases like this. She said that she had to conclude that a stable family life in childhood provides psychological goods that cannot be given through any other way. There aren’t enough government programs, personal charitable efforts, or anything else to compensate adequately for a chaotic childhood. My friend was certainly not saying that we can wash our hands of the responsibility for our neighbor’s welfare, but she was concluding — accurately — that we have to recognize the limits of our ability to change the lives of others. She was also saying that her experience with the carpenter made her more fully aware of how important it is to do everything she can to give her own children a stable home life.

Notice that I’m not saying — nor did I hear her to say — “affluent” home life. My folks never had a lot of money. We were an ordinary working-class to lower-middle-class family. But the gift my mother and father gave me of an orderly, stable childhood was priceless, I now see. How did they do it? They were both imperfect people who endured their share of difficulties in marriage, caused by their own flaws, as well as a period of economic stress. My father is no longer with us to discuss the matter, but the truth is, neither one of them would have been given over to much self-reflection on the question. They were the kind of people who would have simply said, “We made a vow,” and left it at that. For them, that was reason enough to stay together — that, and they always made it clear that the needs of us kids came before their own. That was just how my folks went through life. Not to get too philosophical about it, but for them, that was the Tao.

That wouldn’t have guaranteed stability in my family’s or my late sister’s, but they gave us such a good model of how family was supposed to work. Again, I don’t want to hold my mom and dad out to have been perfect. I don’t think there are any perfect families, and certainly mine had its particular flaws, some of which had unfortunate long-term consequences. That said, I am so very grateful to my parents for holding things together, and showing my sister and me that it is possible to build that kind of life, even when you don’t have much money.

My father was the chief breadwinner in our household, and, because they were a traditional 1950s-era couple, he was the one who dictated how our financial resources would be handled. I find this interesting with relation to the Atlantic article because having grown up very poor in the Great Depression, he ought to have been shaped by the experience of inconstancy in a particular way. Remember, the Atlantic writer said:

There might be food in the pantry today, but there might not be tomorrow, so there is a risk that comes with waiting. And even if their parents promise to buy more of a certain food, sometimes that promise gets broken out of financial necessity.

That’s how my father grew up, but that same experience made him far more likely to do what he could to hedge against chaos. He talked to Ruthie and me a lot about these things, relating him to his childhood. His own father was away from home for most of my dad’s early childhood, entirely because he had to work and send money back to support his wife, children, and elderly mother, who lived in the household. That sense of vulnerability made a profound impression on my dad, who was determined that his children would not feel it, if he could help it.

Daddy wasn’t unique in that. What I can’t quite understand today is why his response to childhood poverty and insecurity was so very different from what is normal today. That is, Daddy’s response was to live as an adult in such a way that he was less vulnerable to that chaos, and in which his own children were made less vulnerable to the chaos that would have come had outside pressures broken the family apart. I’ve written many times in this space about how he had deep compassion for people who were poor and suffering victims of circumstance, but also something bordering on contempt for people who were poor and suffering, but who always blamed others, or fate, for their suffering. He would say, “You can’t do nothin’ for people like that.” This was the opinion of a man who had once been poor, and who had lived his entire life in the same community as poor people, and working with them. Kind of like that country lawyer I mentioned above.

It seems to me that aside from his personal qualities, my father was the beneficiary of a local culture that, for better or for worse, had a strong bias against people living morally disordered lives. I should add that my dad had much more hostility towards middle class and wealthy people who lived that way. “They know better,” he would say. “They don’t have an excuse.” In his case, it wasn’t so much a matter of religion — my dad wasn’t particularly observant — as it was a matter of shame and honor. The culture that shaped my father’s code said it was dishonorable for men and women to live in ways that violated its core moral code. I heard my dad say on a number of occasions, “There’s no shame in being poor,” but he also spoke with stern judgment against men who abandoned their families, people who wouldn’t work, and so forth.

That code could be harsh, but it was more realistic about life than a lot of what passes for wisdom today. I think that has a lot to do with why Jordan Peterson is so popular. He gives to young men a sense of moral agency. Peterson is not Moses coming down from the summit of Sinai, but he talks common sense to a culture that has forgotten it. There has never been a society, and never will be a society, in which somebody can live like a fool and not pay the consequences — and for that matter, inflict consequences on others. You can’t not show up for work and expect to keep your job forever. You can’t ignore your kids and expect that they will grow up to be responsible people. You can’t get loaded every weekend and wonder why your roof is falling in, and won’t fix itself. You can’t allow television and social media to raise your children, and expect that they will be good.  And so forth.

“The world doesn’t owe you a living,” my father would lecture me, usually when I hadn’t done my homework, or failed to do something I was supposed to have done. I suppose this attitude is what made my dad a natural conservative. He couldn’t stand people who were ungrateful and lazy. His basic attitude towards us kids was: I bust my ass to provide for y’all, and I’ll be damned if I’m going to let you waste the opportunities you’ve been given. There was a time in my life when I thought he was so square, but the older I get, the more I see that there really isn’t any other way to live. My dad was keen to help people who were down on their luck, and I see now that he allowed himself to be taken advantage of by some folks with hard-luck stories. Mostly, though, what he was eager to do was to teach people how to help themselves, and to encourage them to do so. For him, this was a matter of natural justice. A society in which people were rewarded even though they did the wrong thing, or failed to do the right thing, was not a just or good society. And doing the right thing always meant subjugating your own desires to the greater good, especially the greater good of your family.

Here’s a funny thing: a few years back, when I was working with the African-American actor Wendell Pierce on his memoir of growing up in south Louisiana, I spent some time speaking with his Uncle L.C. Edwards, the last surviving member of Wendell’s parents’ generation. Uncle L.C. was the same age as my father, and like him, had grown up in rural poverty. I loved the stories of L.C.’s parents (that is, Wendell’s grandparents): poor black farmers who weren’t educated, but who had a very strong religious ethic, and who placed enormous value on education and self-discipline as the only reliable means of self-advancement. Poverty was the enemy of both L.C. and my father, but Lloyd and his siblings also had to deal with Jim Crow. If memory serves, every one of the children of Wendell’s grandparents got educated, and escaped poverty. I’m telling you, the chapter on Papo and Mamo (the grandchildren’s name for L.C.’s parents) is worth the price of the book. Here’s a characteristic excerpt:

One Christmas evening after supper, the Edwardses went to call on their College Point neighbors, to wish them a happy holiday. The kids were startled to go into one house and to see that all that family had eaten for their Christmas meal was potatoes and grits. When they returned home, Papo told the children, “This is what I mean when I tell you it’s important to save for a rainy day. If you put your money aside now, you will have enough to eat well on Christmas.”

Given the man Papo was, if the Edwardses had any food left, he probably took it to that poor family and didn’t tell his own children for the sake of preserving their neighbors’ dignity.

His children remembered Papo as a slow talker but a deep thinker. He never made a quick decision, but acted only after prayer, deliberation, and sleeping on it. Whatever the answer was, he arrived at it through careful reason, not passion. Acting on impulse was the sure way to lose your money, in Papo’s view.

Papo worked for a time in a sugar factory and received his weekly wages in a brown packet. He had a firm rule with himself: Wait twenty-four hours before spending a penny of it. Uncle L.C. said that as a young working man, he thought his father’s rule was silly. You have the money, he figured, so why not enjoy it?

But when he got married and started a family of his own, he understood Papo’s good sense and followed the rule himself. Uncle L.C., who worked at the DuPont chemical plant, has done well through saving and investing over the years. To this day, he credits Papo for teaching him by word and example the importance of being careful with your money and not letting your passions guide your decisions.

Talking with L.C. was like speaking with a black version of my own father. Though he had long been in retirement when I met him, L.C. was always thinking of ways he could make a little money. He told me about how he would take fatherless black boys from a nearby trailer park, and try to teach them something about working to make money and to plan for the future. He told me how sorry he felt for those young men, who had no father in the home to offer them direction, or a sense of responsible manhood.

But his pity had strict limits. Like my own father, L.C. was death on those who wouldn’t work or practice self-discipline. He told me about how his own wife, a retired public schoolteacher, quit her job the very day the last of their adult children no longer needed their help paying for college. She was of a generation for whom education was the most precious thing, their ticket out of poverty and oppression. Today, though, she was worn down by students who wouldn’t work, wouldn’t behave themselves, and parents who blamed the schools and the teachers for their kids’ failures.

American culture is far less friendly to the worldview of those Depression babies like L.C. and my father. Politics and economics are complicated things. You can’t simply apply a moral code to every situation, and expect it to solve the problem. But let’s recognize this: very few Americans in 2018 are as materially poor as my dad and L.C. Edwards were when they came into this world in the 1930s. Is there anybody in America today who is poorer than a black child born to uneducated farmers living in the Deep South under American apartheid? And yet, look what they did with what they had been given! There never will be a society in which family won’t matter, and in which moral self-discipline won’t matter. 

The wealthy, and those with social connections, can absorb a lot more disorder than the less well off can, but money won’t last forever.

The world we have today is wealthier, and in some ways is better able to defray the cost of that disorder. We have more of a social safety net today than we did back then. But this world is much poorer in social capital, which is not something you can raise from Chinese bankers.

There’s a lot of brokenness in this country, and no clear way to fix it. The people my dinner companion and I were talking about last night are white. They live in Charles Murray’s fictional Fishtown. They diverge greatly from the core values and practices of stable middle-class and well-off Americans, in ways that were not true a couple of generations ago. Society has grown far more individualistic and tolerant of non-conformity. This is not entirely a bad thing! But the cost to people who don’t have a lot of social and material capital to begin with has been immense. People love to imagine that if only we brought good jobs back to America, or voted in this or that political party, then these problems would solve themselves. I don’t believe that’s true. That’s no reason not to try to improve opportunities for people, but there are no government programs or private charitable initiatives that can meaningfully compensate for the loss of a sense of moral order and purpose.

Finally, I phrase occurred to me while writing this post, a fragment from something I’d read ages ago. I googled it, and the source turned up here. Here is the excerpt I was thinking about. The writer is talking about the 1950s:

It was a more human world in that it was a sexier world, because sex was still a story. Each high school senior class had exactly one girl who got pregnant and one guy who was the father, and it was the town’s annual scandal. Either she went somewhere and had the baby and put it up for adoption, or she brought it home as a new baby sister, or the couple got married and the town topic changed. It was a stricter, tougher society, but its bruising sanctions came from ancient wisdom.

We have all had a moment when all of a sudden we looked around and thought: The world is changing, I am seeing it change. This is for me the moment when the new America began: I was at a graduation ceremony at a public high school in New Jersey. It was 1971 or 1972. One by one a stream of black-robed students walked across the stage and received their diplomas. And a pretty young girl with red hair, big under her graduation gown, walked up to receive hers. The auditorium stood up and applauded. I looked at my sister: “She’s going to have a baby.”

The girl was eight months pregnant and had had the courage to go through with her pregnancy and take her finals and finish school despite society’s disapproval.

But: Society wasn’t disapproving. It was applauding. Applause is a right and generous response for a young girl with grit and heart. And yet, in the sound of that applause I heard a wall falling, a thousand-year wall, a wall of sanctions that said: We as a society do not approve of teenaged unwed motherhood because it is not good for the child, not good for the mother and not good for us.

The old America had a delicate sense of the difference between the general (“We disapprove”) and the particular (Let’s go help her”). We had the moral self-confidence to sustain the paradox, to sustain the distance between “official” disapproval and “unofficial” succor. The old America would not have applauded the girl in the big graduation gown, but some of its individuals would have helped her not only materially but with some measure of emotional support. We don’t so much anymore. For all our tolerance and talk we don’t show much love to what used to be called girls in trouble. As we’ve gotten more open-minded we’ve gotten more closed-hearted.

Message to society: What you applaud, you encourage. And: Watch out what you celebrate.

The author of those words is Peggy Noonan. She published them in, get this, 1992. Some things have gotten better over the last 26 years. For example, when she published this, David Dinkins was mayor of her town, New York City, and the city would record just over 2,000 homicides. Know how many the city recorded last year, 25 years after the column was published? Only 290.  Progress is real!

On the other hand, I can’t get out of my head the words spoken to me by a professor at an Evangelical Christian college. Speaking about the student body, which is predominantly white, he told me that he didn’t think most of them would ever be able to form stable families. I was shocked by this.These were not kids from the blighted projects or wretched rural trailer parks. Why not? I asked.

He said, “Because they have never seen it done.”

We live in a society in which the moral code that we applaud and the people we celebrate all say: Take the marshmallow now, and don’t worry about the future. This is going to cost us.

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WATCH: House Majority Leader McCarthy Defends Republican Party Progress After John Boehner’s Dismissive Remarks

On Sunday, House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union.” During an exchange with host Dana Bash, McCarthy defended the direction in which the Republican Party is going: BASH: Let’s move on to what your former colleague, the former Speaker of the House John Boehner, said this week. Take a listen.

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Salah making progress in fitness battle for Russia

Mohamed Salah is continuing to make encouraging progress in his unlikely battle to be fit for Egypt’s World Cup campaign. The Liverpool forward suffered a shoulder injury in last month’s Champions League final defeat to Real Madrid and it was assumed he would miss out on the Russian showpiece.

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For Interstate 526 supporters, is Gov. Henry McMaster’s comment progress or posturing?

Last week, Gov. Henry McMaster told the S.C. Transportation Infrastructure Bank to support extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands – a move that provoked intense reactions from residents who have watched this soap opera of a project play out for years. In a series of Facebook comments, residents of West Ashley and Johns Island shared both excitement and horror at the notion the Mark Clark Expressway project may be revived from its bureaucratic coma.

Read more from South Carolina Senate…

Armed customer takes out robbery suspect. Now police seek customer for assault with deadly weapon.

An armed customer at a California restaurant’s drive-thru reportedly noticed an attempted burglary in progress inside the restaurant, so he apparently decided to intervene.

The customer allegedly shot through the drive-thru window at the robbery suspect, reportedly striking him twice and helping bring the purported burglary attempt to an end.

Now police are looking for the shooter on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon, the Orange County Register reported.

What are the details?

The incident took place in Santa Ana just after midnight Saturday when a masked man reportedly entered The Cozy Corner armed with a revolver and a bag.

The 60-year-old suspect allegedly threw the bag over the counter at an employee and demanded the employee fill the bag with cash.

As the female employee filled the bag with the store’s cash, shots rang out.

A customer, who had reportedly watched the event unfold through a drive-through window, pulled out a firearm and shot through the take-out window at the suspect, striking the suspect at least twice, according to KCAL-TV.

Santa Ana Police Cmdr. Michael Claborn told the Register that the shots shattered the drive-through window.

“It was very dangerous, one of the employees could have been shot,” Claborn said.

Daniel Acevedo, a second restaurant employee, said that three shots reportedly rang out — two of which purportedly struck the suspect, and one that hit the restaurant’s drink machine.

In security video footage of the incident, a car can be see fleeing the drive-through after its driver reportedly fired the shots, leaving the scene entirely.

Acevedo said that he believed that the alleged shooter was trying to help, according to KCAL.

The station reported that police responded to the scene only to discover the suspected robber had made it out of the restaurant and across the street.

The suspected thief was reportedly “shot twice in the upper body and bleeding,” KCAL reported.

Police took the robbery suspect to the hospital for evaluation, and he, at the time of the report, was in stable condition. Police arrested the man on suspicion of robbery suspect, according to the Register.

Now police are seeking the driver of the car who reportedly shot the robbery suspect. According to the Register, the driver is “now wanted on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon.”

The outlet reported that a description of the driver was not available at the time of publication.

Francisco Reyno, the restaurant manager, told KNBC-TV that the stolen money — approximately $274 — was recovered.

Read more from The Blaze…

Stepping behind the walls: Nine new things we learned about Toy Story Land

The countdown to the opening of Toy Story Land on June 30th is well under way, and I had the opportunity to step behind the themed walls at Disney’s Hollywood Studios to see the land’s progress. If you aren’t familiar with Toy Story Land, it is an 11 …

Read more from Toy Story…

A Young Man With the Biggest Balls in Texas is Gone: R.I.P. Christian Garcia

I’ll get to Christian Garcia in a moment, but first – my heart goes out on this weekend to the victims and their families, friends, neighbors, fellow students and staff at Santa Fe High School near Galveston – as well as all the good people of the great state of Texas.

One of the most heinous attacks ever seen at a Texas school occurred on Friday, May 18th when 9 students and 1 teacher were killed in the mass-school shooting which left ten others were wounded by the 17-year-old shooter and fellow student at Santa Fe High School.

I can tell you this: From here forward, I’m fed up and done talking and writing about active shooters, mass shootings at schools, sociopaths, guns, mental health experts, rules of engagement and just in case you’re wondering – yes – I’m putting my money where my mouth is.

It’s been 20 years since Columbine. Now think about that. Go ahead, think about 20 years passing – I’ll give you a few minutes:

All the bullshit talk and posturing by politicians. Michael Moore and his stupid movie – “Bowling” for Columbine – yeah, you’re about as clever as making armpit farts, Mike.

Then there’s the irrational lies and disingenuous blaming of inanimate objects for the actions of murderous sociopaths, or confused and angry children – bereft of love or purpose – hepped up for years on psychotropic pills prescribed en masse by lazy psycho “doctors,” simply because no one wanted to take time out from their own selfish lives to really help them cope.

Bla bla bla bla bla blab bla blah – I’m done. After 20 years of experts, authorities, regulations, talk shows, political agendas and endless platitudes what do we have to show for it?

Just dozens more dead innocent school kids. Dead. Gone.

They’re not out having a blast this Memorial Day weekend with their families and friends OR visiting the cemetery where great-grandad lies – you know – the guy who trudged across Europe in his bare feet to kill Nazis, climbed into a tin can and submerged under the Pacific to fight Tojo’s Navy, or stared down Rommel’s tanks in North Africa?

Yeah, that guy. That guy WHO GAVE YOU THIS INTERNET?

Those dead kids will never get to be cool, as Neil Young says. And why? Because nobody does anything. They just talk. And talk. And then talk some more… Well, it’s over sports fans – time for you and me to trudge across our own country and protect our children in the classroom and do it now.

Here’s what I’m doing and I’d like you to read on and perhaps reach out if you give a damn. If you don’t, then just keep watching this new reality show called; “Let’s shoot up the next school, then blame everybody for a couple weeks till the next one comes along: Rinse and Repeat.”

Think I’m an a-hole? Would it surprise you if I said I agree with that assessment? Kinda hoping you’ll also agree with George Bernard Shaw when he said “all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” .. He was talking about a-holes like me, btw. But I digress.. Don’t worry, I’m getting to Christian’s story.

I’ve been deeply involved in a project which has the potential to touch all your lives and virtually anyone in the country with kids or grandkids. It will take resolute action – not just talk – coupled with the will to employ rigorous and unflinching solutions to not only reduce but eradicate these horrific events. Yes, I know of all the increased security, expanded mental health measures, improved training for law enforcement, calls for more gun-control, posturing and lecturing by politicians on and on and on it goes..

But all of this and more were present in Parkland, Florida and Santa Fe High School in Texas and yet: Twenty-two murdered children, dozens injured, and hundreds traumatized – some for life. Obviously there must be a safe alternative to protecting our kids in class rooms other what we’re doing now – which is not working.

SO: What’s the solution, Rodney Lee?

Soon after the horrific incident at Santa Fe High School, which is near Galveston, Texas; ‘SwiftShield’ – the company I’ve joined up with in the fight to secure and lock-down school classrooms – allowed me to develop an innovative program I believe will cut through the red tape and politics which is enabling this continued slaughter of innocent school children. In fact, I know it will.

It’s called the S.O.S – ‘Shield Our Schools’ initiative and it’s quite unique in that ‘SwiftShield’ is now partnering with several of its large corporate sponsors and others to outfit schools all over the country with their line of devices which easily and effectively lock-down classrooms in the event of another one of these attacks.

We’re putting our money where our mouth’s are – along with other private-sector entities who are exasperated with the lack of a government answer to this very real and deadly problem. In fact, I can make you a great case that government actions are making this problem worse: FAR worse. Keep reading.

What first drew my attention to ‘SwiftShield’ a year ago, is the effectiveness of these products – they lock-down classrooms instantly in the event of an active-shooter or similar threats, can withstand thousands of pounds of pressure and stop bullets from hand guns, military-style weapons and shotguns – I’ve seen it.

And now, the entire design, product and system installation doesn’t cost the school or district a penny – it’s all handled by our corporate partners, sponsors and donors who are ready and willing right now to get involved to help our students be safe during these threats. That way we’re not even having a conversation about school budgets or costs conflicting with teacher pay or books, etc. It’s free to the schools.

As we speak, we are in the process of outfitting every classroom in the Santa Fe ISD, free of charge. That means the designing and installing of the SwiftShield system in every classroom on every door in all eight schools in the entire district – completely cost-free. It’s all being handled by corporate sponsorship.

Now get this: All public schools everywhere – in every State – can apply and receive a complete classroom active-shooter emergency system installed through the ‘Shield Our Schools’ initiative, absolutely free of cost. The funding is handled outside of any expenditures by the schools or districts themselves. In the past two months alone, this could have saved the lives of twenty kids at bare minimum – probably more.

So, as the headline stated, I did want to tell you about a 15-year-old student named Christian Garcia: If you haven’t heard about Christian, you should have – and you should share this article with everyone in your email contact list because Christian Garcia died a hero: And he had the biggest balls in Texas.

While the bullets were flying inside Santa Fe High School, Christian died while blocking the door from the attacker to give other students time to escape. He stood steadfast as long as he could, waving other students away and giving his classmates those precious seconds they needed – even as shots ripped through the door locks and then through his body.

As honorable and heroic as Christian was, I don’t believe a kid should ever be put in a position to have to make that choice. Does anyone believe Christian would have done great things in life had he survived? Anyone think his name is a coincidence? Not me.

take a look. a long look. that’s what a superhero looks like.

Which is why we’re (that means you and me, friendo) are now on a mission to get a SwiftShield door barricade device into every Santa Fe ISD classroom and then every door in the country. You and I both know in our hearts that it’s no longer a question of “if” but a matter of “when” and this seems to me to be the answer to not only get through the ugly politics of this mess, but a perfect solution to the question of already cash-strapped school budgets. Blam!

This is a no-brainer, dudes and dudettes. There’s a willingness and money to do this right now – in droves – everyone wants to help, we just need to get the information to them. Crazy right? Wrong. It’s happening.

Kids have the right to go to school get an education, participate in athletics, after-school projects, or go to the prom without worrying about being gunned down because government has failed at every level. I pray to God I never have to go through what these families are going through and I’m sure you feel the same about your family.

Nothing will change if we don’t stand up and help save lives by buying time and giving first responders those precious extra minutes when every second counts. SwiftShield is looking for corporate partners to donate products through the S.O.S. CAMPAIGN “ Shield Our Schools”  that allows schools to get free secondary safety Devices and not at the tax payers dollar since the government won’t stand up and protect them . And if you are a business that wants to do something to protect our kids let me know.

If you are a fellow warrior – write me and tell me you’re going to walk one of these into your local high school and say; “why don’t we have these yesterday – they’re free?rodney@swiftshield.com

kinda fired up, aren’t I?

The post A Young Man With the Biggest Balls in Texas is Gone: R.I.P. Christian Garcia appeared first on Joe For America.

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