What will Inslee do in 2020? | COMMENTARY

The political machinery of Jay Inslee is in pretty much full operation these days. And it’s stirred up a spew of speculation on what Washington’s two-term Democratic governor will do in 2020. Run for president? Seek a third term? Retire on Bainbridge …

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Bill Clinton Apologizes Again After NBC Interview

Former President Bill Clinton was condemned by critics of all political stripes Monday after he refused to acknowledge he owed Monica Lewinsky an apology for the biggest scandal of the 90s.

Monica Lewinsky

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Discussing the right to disagree: Brooks on MSNBC’s ‘MSNBC Live with Ali Velshi’ – AEI – American Enterprise Institute: Freedom, Opportunity, Enterprise

President Arthur Brooks discusses the importance of productive conversations across ideological lines and the right to hold different opinions through examining NFL players kneeling during the National Anthem.

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Israel’s Netanyahu, France’s Macron disagree over Iran deal

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and French President Emmanuel Macron held a joint news conference Tuesday yet stuck to their opposing views on Iran and the 2015 deal that curbed its nuclear program. Talking to reporters in Paris after meeting the French leader at the Elysee Palace, Netanyahu said his main focus now was how to push Iranian forces out of Syria.

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Fmr Ecuador President Rafaell Correa: Latin America is now experiencing an aggressive return to its neoliberal past

Rafael Correa is charismatic man who knows how to communicate. Two qualities that helped him to reach the presidency of Ecuador in 2007, a nation that up to that point had been on unstable political ground. Before Correa at least seven presidents had alternated between scandals, popular protests and replacements – until the Palace of Carondelet had as its occupant this economist turned leader. During the 10 years of his tenure in office he promoted a Citizen Revolution which improved the conditions of the poorest Ecuadorians with a vast improvement of social programs. Working now as journalist with Russia Today Correa has been able to reflect on what it takes to be a strong decisive leader. “It isn’t about if someone dislikes me or not, I have no control over that. I never looked at my job as President as trying to please everyone it was about what was needed to move the country forward.” With that same clarity Correa warned during our interview in Caracas that, “what we have in Latin America now is an onslaught; an aggressive return of the neo liberal past. It is a terrible neo conservatism that respects absolutely nothing, neither democracy nor human rights, nor constitutional order and with an impressive double standard at the inter-Americanism at the world level.”

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President James Buchanan died 150 years ago: the legacy of Pa.’s only president, then and now

James Buchanan, the only American president to hail from Pennsylvania, died on June 1, 1868. This Friday will mark the 150th anniversary of his death. “Buchanan essentially died of old age at the age of 77,” said Stephanie Townrow, museum educator with …

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MSU’s Grant Presidential Library, local historian partner in search for former Union soldier graves

COLUMBUS — A Columbus cemetery known as one of the sites where the Memorial Day holiday began could soon be home to another memorial. Historians with the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library at Mississippi State and local historian Rufus Ward are …

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Mexico Front-Runner’s Ambitious Plan Depends on ‘Economizer-in-Chief’

Mexico’s leading presidential candidate has a daunting challenge that keeps his would-be finance minister awake at night: find some $20 billion every year to step up social spending and public investment without raising taxes or debt.

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