Miguel Obando y Bravo, 92, key figure in Nicaraguan turmoil

In 1979, when the war was at its peak, Cardinal Obando wrote a pastoral letter urging Nicaraguans not to fear socialism and seeming to endorse the use of revolutionary violence in some circumstances. Supporters of the Somoza government suggested that the …

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Meeting with Group of Experts on Democratic Republic of the Congo

Staff of the Human Rights Office say they are appalled at the ongoing violence in Nicaragua, where at least 16 people are reported to have been killed this week and more than 100 injured amid anti-Government protests. They are also concerned at the …

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Nicaraguans Block Roads Across Country, Want Ortega Out

(From UPI)

Across Nicaragua, protesters are blocking highways and streets to send a message to the government after more than 70 protesters were allegedly killed by police last month.

The tranques vary in size, from about 4-foot-high walls on Managua avenues that slow car traffic, to piles of metal and burning tires on vital highways that delay trucks transporting food staples to other parts of the country, causing food and medicine shortages in some regions.

Protesters, whom authorities have allowed to maintain the tranques without interference in most — but not all — cases, say they plan to block roads until they get justice for the more than 70 people who were killed during protests against the government’s plan to increase social security taxes and cut benefits.

What that justice entails depends on who is describing it, but generally consists of some iteration of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega leaving office.

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Dialogue in Nicaragua – an inauspicious start

Internationally, those governments echoed the false claims of their own extreme right wing politicians, cynically alleging disproportionate repression by Nicaragua’s police. Even so, neither Nicaragua’s protesting students nor most international …

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Dialogue In Nicaragua: An Inauspicious Start The student protests of April 18 in Nicaragua were immediately…

Dialogue In Nicaragua: An Inauspicious Start

The student protests of April 18 in Nicaragua were immediately hijacked by violent right-wing extremists backed locally by sections of the business classes, the right-wing Catholic church hierarchy and center-right politicians, long funded by the United States and allied governments. Internationally, those governments echoed the false claims of their own extreme right-wing politicians, cynically alleging disproportionate repression by Nicaragua's police. Even so, neither Nicaragua's protesting students nor most international progressive and liberal opinion seem to note the paradox that viciously repressive reactionary right-wing forces are supposedly promoting genuinely democratic protests against the most economically successful and electorally popular government in Central America.
https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Dialogue-In-Nicaragua-An-Inauspicious-Start-20180512-0017.html

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Columnist ignores reality on asylum seekers

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson worries over asylum seekers unable to complete “the long and perilous trek north through Mexico” from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. The trip from Tegucigalpa, Honduras north to Nogales, Sonora, Mexico is 2,493 miles, but next door south to Managua, Nicaragua is only 375 miles.

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Dentists and soldiers are learning to mix cocktails and pour coffee to escape Venezuela’s imploding economy

Venezuela Caracas bar bartending cocktail economy crisisREUTERS/Marco Bello

CARACAS (Reuters) – Like many young Venezuelans in recent years, dentist Carlos Alzaibar felt forced to leave the country when he could scrape together only a few dollars equivalent each month doing two jobs.

So on a recent day, just before flying to Madrid, he was sadly packing a red suitcase — while stacking diplomas from a half a dozen trades he picked up in the last year from bakery and bartending to photography and burger-flipping.See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: Venezuela was Latin America’s richest country and now it is in complete crisis — here’s how it fell apart

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SEE ALSO: ‘Like a natural disaster had hit’: Venezuela’s crisis is spilling over its borders — here’s what it’s like at ground zero of the exodus

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