New Hampshire Police Charged and Arrested a Man for Criticizing Them on the Internet

On May 23, a police officer arrested Robert W. Frese in Exeter, New Hampshire and took him to the station for booking. Frese is no stranger to law enforcement; in the past, he has been convicted of fraud , criminal trespassing , and a hit-and-run .

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New Hampshire Senate Rejects Occupational Licensing Bill

The New Hampshire Senate Executive Departments and Administration Committee rejected a bill that would have created a state commission for reviewing occupational licensing rules.

The committee voted to reject House Bill 1685 (H.B. 1685) on April 5. The state House of Representatives had approved the bill in March.

Opportunities Squashed

H.B. 1685’s sponsor, state Rep. Bill Ohm (R-Nashua) says his bill could have helped people get  jobs and lift themselves out of poverty and drug addiction.

“New Hampshire has an interesting dichotomy,” Ohm said. “We have extremely low unemployment but high levels of opioid addiction. We have perhaps 15,000 recovering opioid addicts sidelined from our workforce, and a need for able-bodied working adults. One part of the bill was to make New Hampshire ‘recovery friendly’ by requiring licensing boards to determine, in advance, whether an individual’s criminal record would disqualify that individual from obtaining the appropriate license.”

Ohm says H.B. 1685 would have created opportunities for those seeking to better themselves.

“The intention of the bill was to increase employment opportunities for those who wish to work,” Ohm said. “It does that by starting a process to review all occupational licensing over a five-year period to see if the current laws are appropriate.”

Hoped to Cut Cronyism

Ohm says many occupational licensing rules reflect obvious cronyism.

“Some professions, such as cosmetology, require more than 1,000 hours of training to get an appropriate license,” Ohm said. “The expense of that training serves to discourage job seekers who wish to enter that profession, and seems to primarily benefit those who wish to restrict additional competition. If an EMT can qualify for a license with 40 hours of training, is cosmetology that much more dangerous to public health and safety?”

‘Little Public Purpose’

David Harrington, an economics professor at Kenyon College, says his research has led him to conclude occupational licensing needlessly increases the prices of goods and services.

“Most of my studies of occupational licensing involve the funeral industry,” Harrington said. “I have found evidence that more stringent requirements to become a funeral service worker increase funeral prices paid by consumers and reduce the likelihood that they choose cremation, because funeral directors persuade many of them to purchase a more expensive, traditional earth burial.”

Ohm says many government occupational restrictions have little real benefit for the general public.

“Licensing is certainly appropriate for occupations that put the health and safety of the public at risk, such as medical professionals, but other licensed professions, such as an athletic trainer or an auctioneer, seem to involve little public risk,” Ohm said. “Requiring a state license to enter certain professions seems to create a high barrier to entry with little public purpose.”

Disparate Impacts

The burden of government permission slips is especially heavy for women and ethnic minorities, Harrington says.

“Women are less likely to be funeral directors in states that require all funeral directors to be embalmers,” Harrington said. “I also think that these laws make it difficult for immigrants to enter funeral directing to serve their communities.”

Free-Market Alternatives

Ohm says the public can ensure the safety and quality of goods and services without government control.

“Professions should be open to jobseekers who meet appropriate standards of training and proficiency,” Ohm said. “Industry or government certifications, proof of insurance and bonding, and even social media reports are less restrictive ways to protect consumers than licensing.”

Editor’s Note: This article was published in cooperation with The Heartland Institute’s Budget & Tax News.

PHOTO: New Hampshire State House in Concord, NH. Photograph taken and uploaded by Jared C. Benedict on 29 December 2004. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

The post New Hampshire Senate Rejects Occupational Licensing Bill appeared first on New Revere Daily Press.

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New Hampshire Senior News: Conway adult day center groundbreaking set for Tuesday

Miss Senior New Hampshire Carrye Schenk, 78, a resident of Birch Hill Terrace in Manchester, is crowned by Miss West Virginia Carolyn Cottrell during a crowning ceremony at the retirement home on Friday. Schenk will compete in August for the Miss Senior …

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What Do You Get When You Google ‘Homeschoolers’?

My wife and I have four children and we homeschool them. People often ask us if that is difficult, with the kids there all the time. We usually respond by pointing out the benefits of home schooling.

And there are many, many benefits to home schooling our children. There might be more expenses involved than just sending them to public school, since the government has already captured our tax dollars. But homeschooling is cheaper than sending them to private school and we know exactly what we are getting.

We don’t have to get the kids up early and get them ready to go. They can learn at their own natural pace, rather than struggling to keep up with or being slowed down by the class. We don’t have to pack lunches for them in advance or pay for lousy cafeteria food. Much of the school day at public schools is filler; we can cut that out.

Any school violence is handled by saying “Son, stop hitting your sister!” And there are no disruptions or penalties if we decide to take the whole family from New Hampshire to Florida for a few months in the winter, which is awesome.

The bottom line is that home schooling allows us to fit education around our family’s life rather than the other way around.

But having said all that, yes, there are difficulties that are common to home schooling parents everywhere. Often, we know exactly what they need to learn, and proceed to teach them. But we don’t always have the subject competency that we would like to teach our children.

The way that most homeschooling families handle this is by banding together. We form co-ops to help our children learn and socialize together. This allows us to use the expertise of other parents to fill in what we lack and it allows us to seek out resources — from online classes to specialized tutoring and teaching — together.

Homeschooling co-ops have become such a big deal that Google is even taking notice. It will soon be making a resource called G Suite for Education available to co-ops like mine, helping to further close the resource gap between public schools and folks who have to create school from scratch.

G Suite for education is a suite, or bundle, of tools — a little bit like Microsoft Office, but it’s free and much more internet-based. These tools include Google Drive and Docs, Calendar, Gmail and Google Classroom. As someone who uses Google tools extensively in his business, I am very happy that my children will soon be able to use the same tools and more to further their educations.

This new tool should make it easier for them to get individual instruction from teachers over the internet, organize, collaborate with other co-op classmates when they aren’t in the same place, and do all kinds of things I couldn’t even dream of doing at their age. It’s wonderful to see the opportunities available to this generation of homeschoolers.

Google takes a lot of flak for its policies in other areas, but good on the company for making this happen.

The post What Do You Get When You Google ‘Homeschoolers’? appeared first on The American Spectator.

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New Hampshire Dug Deep Into Allegations Of Widespread Voter Fraud. It Found Very Little.

New Hampshire election officials dug into claims there was widespread voter fraud in the state during the 2016 presidential election and found no evidence to support his claim. In fact, the officials didn’t find much evidence of fraud at all. During a pr …

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Your Daughter, Somebody Else’s Son

A reader in Massachusetts forwards this story about a bill before the Massachusetts legislature that would ban any therapy designed to change a person’s homosexual orientation, or belief that they are transgender. From the piece:

In the midst of a recent trend, Massachusetts is not at the forefront but may be reaching for the pinnacle. Eleven other states have banned conversion therapy, including New Hampshire earlier this month. But the Massachusetts bill is unusual, says Andrew Beckwith, president of the Massachusetts Family Institute.

“Similar legislation has been passed in a number of states, but this is the first time that helping your child feel comfortable in their own body could brand you a child abuser,” said Beckwith, whose organization advocates for Judaeo-Christian family values on Beacon Hill. “This is a bill that would allow the state to take away your daughter and make her someone else’s son.”

But [bill advocate Carl] Sciortino says the bill is necessary and humane.

“I think our opponents are delusional and adding to the culture of child abuse if they cannot accept that there are gay people in this world and transgender people in this world and we are who we are and no amount of quackery or child abuse will change that,” Sciortino said.

Do you see what they’re doing here? They are conflating homosexuality with transgenderism. Whatever one thinks of homosexuality and its mutability, there is very clear evidence that the great majority of children and teenagers who consider themselves transgender ultimately resolve their dysphoria in favor of their biological sex. We’re talking 80 percent and more. That does not happen with homosexuality. This clearly indicates that transgenderism is far, far less ingrained than homosexuality.

Transgender activists and fellow-traveling advocates are trying to piggyback transgenderism onto homosexuality as a legal, medical, and cultural strategy. As the reader writes:

The Therapy Ban in CA is bad, but this bill in MA may be even worse. It requires, among other things, that counseling a gender confused child to feel comfortable in their own body be labeled as child abuse under state law and that a Dept of Children and Families investigation be initiated against the parents and therapist. So, if you don’t believe your child is trans and you try to get them help, the therapist loses their license and you lose your child.

If you are a parent of a transgender child, your child has an overwhelming likelihood that he or she will desist at some point. If this bill passes in Massachusetts, you will not be able to get your child therapy that does anything other than encourage them in their trans identity — and no therapist will be able to do otherwise, even if the therapist believes the child is not truly transgender.

The “but science!” crowd is substituting ideology for medicine here. More to the point, the bill would create the possibility of the state seizing a child from his parents for the sake of gender transformation. From the story:

As for taking a child away from parents if they try to change their child’s sexual orientation or gender identity, Sciortino said state officials don’t break up families lightly, and that only in certain cases might it be necessary.

“That’s why we have judges and courts,” Sciortino said. “In this case, if somebody were being exposed to an abusive practice – in this case, abusive therapy – it makes sure that that child has the protection of the mandated reporter system, to see if an investigation is warranted.”

Do people think that this won’t happen to them? That their child would never claim trans status? That the state would never prevent them from getting medically valid therapy for the child? That the state would never take their child away so the child can be injected with hormones, and such?

 

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Why the “October Surprise” Is Dead

So much for this “October surprise.” Above, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Huma Abedin at a Dunkin’ Donuts in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb, 7. Melina Mara/the Washington Post via Getty Images On Friday, Americans got their second …

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