Town orders biz owner to remove ‘excessive’ flags, his act of defiance sparks groundswell of patriotism

A Massachusetts town order for a business to take down its “excessive” American flags sparked an act of civil disobedience instead.

When a Chelmsford business placed 200 flags on its property to honor America’s veterans for Memorial Day, the last thing it expected was the unpatriotic notice from the town’s building department, WBZ-TV reported.

“On Saturday we came out and we lined this with 200 flags in support of our deceased veterans and all the people who have served,” Laer Reality employee Jon Crandall told WBZ-TV.

When he showed up to work Friday, Crandall said there was a note on the door slapping the business with a violation by the town which cited a statute saying flags cannot be used for “commercial promotion.”

“This is a commercial establishment located at a busy intersection. It was in the front lawn of that particular property, and in the opinion of our code enforcement officer, the building commissioner, it was a violation,” Michael McCall, Chelmsford’s Assistant Town Manager, told WBZ-TV.

But Laer Realty not only did not comply by removing the “excessive” flags, the business doubled down and added another 300 to the display.

“We feel this is a patriotic act. It’s not about our business. It’s about supporting our troops, supporting veterans,” Crandall said. “I think the flags speak for themselves. I don’t think we need to get into a fight with city hall.”

This is not the first year that the flags have been placed,  but it is the first time the business said they had a complaint.

The town government not only got a defiant response from Laer Reality, but residents showed their support by adding flags of their own, tripling the original amount.

Emelie Primeau was one of the residents who was upset by the citation.

“I went to the store and I bought some flags because I believe in what they’re doing,” she told WBZ-TV.

“It was beautiful, but it certainly was not excessive. I don’t think you could have 2,000 out there and it would look excessive,” Crandall said on “Fox & Friends” on Sunday.

Stacey Alcorn, Laer Realty’s CEO, decided to “dig our heels in” when she heard of the town’s order.

“This had nothing to do with our business. It was us as a community just honoring our veterans and those who serve for us,” Alcorn said, pointing out how the display has “grown significantly” because of the community coming out to support the message they are sending.

“Whether they fine or don’t fine us, those flags are staying up, at least through Flag Day and the Fourth of July,” Alcorn said.

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Virginia Police Chiefs Show Ignorance Of Virginia’s Reciprocity Law

Oppression Jack Boot Thugs Big Government Victims
Virginia Police Chiefs Show Ignorance Of Virginia’s Reciprocity Law

Virginia – -(Ammoland.com)- A group of police chiefs and sheriffs recently signed a letter opposing National Concealed Carry Reciprocity.

These 10 chiefs, 1 lieutenant, and 1 sheriff from Virginia show their complete ignorance of Virginia’s own concealed carry reciprocity law and their disdain for Virginia’s citizens.

Virginia already honors the permits from ALL other states! Virginia Citizens Defense League successfully got that law a few years ago.

National Reciprocity, if passed, would change NOTHING for the police and sheriffs in Virginia. NOTHING.

Their mindless opposition to Americans being able to protect themselves while visiting Virginia is abhorrent. They are also standing in the way of Virginians being able to protect themselves while traveling to places like New York, New Jersey, Maryland, California, and Massachusetts. What business is it of theirs to try to control your actions outside of the Commonwealth?

If you live in the areas covered by any of these departments, contact their chief or the sheriff, respectively, and object lo their signature being on that letter. Better yet, go to the next City Hall meeting and object to City Council about the actions of their Chief of Police (or the Fairfax Board of Supervisors for Sheriff Kincaid). Ignorance of the law is no excuse, including when such ignorance is shown by police leadership.

This is the hall of shame for Virginia:

  • Chief Of Police Anthony Q Ellington Sr, Farmville Police Department, Farmville, VA
  • Chief of Police Gary Benedict, Jr., Town of Middletown Police Dept., Middletown, VA
  • Chief Kenneth A. Miller, Petersburg Bureau of Police, Petersburg, VA
  • Chief of Police Todd Foreman, Bedford Police Department, Bedford, VA
  • Chief Robert D. Plott, Colonial Beach Police Department, Colonial Beach, VA
  • Sheriff Stacey Ann Kincaid, Fairfax County Sheriff’s Office, Fairfax, VA
  • Chief of Police Mary Gavin, Falls Church, Falls Church, VA
  • Police Chief Michael Grinstead, Newport News Police Department, Newport News, VA
  • Chief of Police Kenneth A. Miller, Petersburg Bureau of Police, Petersburg, VA
  • Chief of Police Alfred Durham, Richmond Police Department, Richmond, VA
  • Lieutenant Roger D. Knott, Harrisonburg City Police, Harrisonburg, VA
  • Chief Gregory C. Brown, Leesburg Police Department (VA), Leesburg, VA

Here is an article on the letter: http://blog.cheaperthandirt.com/police-chiefs-opposing-concealed-carry-list

 

Virginia Citizens Defense League

About Virginia Citizens Defense League, Inc. (VCDL):

 

Virginia Citizens Defense League, Inc. (VCDL). VCDL is an all-volunteer, non-partisan grassroots organization dedicated to defending the human rights of all Virginians. The Right to Keep and Bear Arms is a fundamental human right.

For more information, visit: www.vcdl.org.

The post Virginia Police Chiefs Show Ignorance Of Virginia’s Reciprocity Law appeared first on AmmoLand.com.

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Liberal town tells business to remove ‘excessive’ American flags. Now the business is fighting back.

To honor veterans who made the ultimate sacrifice, employees at Laer Reality in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, placed 200 American flags in the grass in the front of their office, which lay adjacent to a busy intersection.

Then the town ordered the flags removed, citing the violation of a town statute for “excessive” flags. Now the business is fighting back.

What happened?

“On Saturday we came out and we lined this with 200 flags in support of our deceased veterans and all the people who have served,” Laer employee Jon Crandall told WBZ-TV.

The business didn’t hear anything negative until Friday, according to Crandall, who said when he showed up to work on Friday there was a note on the door from the city about the flags.

The note explained the business had violated the town’s code for “excessive flags,” and requested the business remove the majority of the flags, so only a “reasonable” amount remained.

According to Michael McCall, Chelmsford’s Assistant Town Manager, the town’s bylaws say flags cannot be used for “commercial promotion.”

“This is a commercial establishment located at a busy intersection. It was in the front lawn of that particular property, and in the opinion of our code enforcement officer, the building commissioner, it was a violation,” he told WBZ.

How did the business respond?

Instead of removing flags, the business added about 300 more. Now, about 500 flags are prominently displaced in front of the business.

“We feel this is a patriotic act. It’s not about our business. It’s about supporting our troops, supporting veterans,” Crandall said. “I think the flags speak for themselves. I don’t think we need to get into a fight with city hall.”

WBZ noted the business is working with the town to determine how many it is allowed to display.

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Zac Bears: Sales tax cut would threaten struggling public college system

Massachusetts lawmakers have been cutting back on their promise of an affordable, accessible college education for almost three decades. Costs for students are ballooning, debt is through the roof, and all the while, the need for a college education is growing greater and greater in Massachusetts.

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Guest View: Sales tax cut would threaten already-struggling public college system

Massachusetts lawmakers have been cutting back on their promise of an affordable, accessible college education for almost three decades. Costs for students are ballooning, debt is through the roof, and all the while, the need for a college education is growing greater and greater in Massachusetts.

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GOP candidate shutting down ministry listed as hate group

A Massachusetts governor’s race candidate is shutting down a nonprofit organization that he founded that ended up on a list of U.S.-based hate groups. Republican Scott Lively has described his Abiding Truth Ministries as pro-family, but his opposition to gay rights has landed him and his Springfield-based ministry on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of designated hate groups.

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GOP candidate Scott Lively says he’s closing down ministry

A Massachusetts governor’s race candidate is shutting down a nonprofit organization that he founded that ended up on a list of U.S.-based hate groups. Republican Scott Lively has described his Abiding Truth Ministries as pro-family, but his opposition to gay rights has landed him and his Springfield-based ministry on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of designated hate groups.

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Tribes’ proposed Conn. casino approved

The U.S. Department of Interior has issued one of two approvals needed for the construction of a Connecticut casino proposed by two federally recognized Native American tribes hoping to compete with a new Massachusetts casino.

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Now’s The Moment breaks Plainridge track record

Now’s The Moment breaks Plainridge track record Thursday, May 31, 2018 – by Tim Bojarski, for the Standardbred Owners of Massachusetts Mike Stevenson left with Now’s The Moment and led every step of the way. With the best view, they toured the facility in fractions of :27.2, :58.2 and 1:26 before turning for home.

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Why Does Maryland Hate Airbnb?

When Marriott International Inc. was considering relocating its global headquarters from Baltimore to Northern Virginia in 1999, Maryland handed over $44 million in grants to keep the hotel chain in the state.

In 2016, after Marriott again made noises about moving out of Maryland, Gov. Larry Hogan, state lawmakers, and local officials coughed up another $62 million in taxpayer subsidies to support the construction of new headquarters in the affluent D.C. suburb of Bethesda.

But even that wasn’t good enough. After padding the bottom line of the world’s largest hotel chain, Maryland lawmakers are now trying to protect it from competition from home-sharing options like Airbnb and HomeAway.

A bill given serious consideration in Annapolis this spring would require platforms like Airbnb to collect detailed information about hosts and guests, retain it for up to four years, and turn it over to the state government if requested. Failure to comply with any of the rules would result in $500 fines for individual hosts, with each further violation adding another $500 to the tab. Critics say the privacy concerns and escalating fines are clearly meant to deter would-be hosts from renting out their spaces.

The bill’s sponsor, Del. William Frick (D–Montgomery County), hails from the district that not-so-coincidentally contains Marriott’s new, state-subsidized corporate headquarters.

The legislation empowers local governments to pass restrictive rules, such as the one already on the books in Frick’s home county prohibiting more than six people from occupying a rented home overnight for virtually any reason, says Romina Boccia, a research fellow at the Heritage Foundation who testified against the bill this year. Better, she says, to follow the model pioneered by Arizona and some other states, which allow local restrictions on short-term rentals only for health and safety reasons.

Home sharing competes with hotels, of course, but it’s not a zero-sum game. Hosts on platforms like Airbnb are responsive to market conditions. According to economists at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, they “expand supply as hotels fill up, and keep hotel prices down as a result.” That allows more people to travel, generating $276 million in surplus bookings in America’s 10 largest cities during 2014 alone, the researchers found.

This is particularly true during times of extremely high demand—in a city hosting a Super Bowl, for example, or on New Year’s Eve. Hotels used to be able to charge significantly higher prices on those occasions, but the advent of home sharing has increased the elasticity in a region’s supply of sleeping accommodations, allowing additional tourists to visit.

Restrictive rules designed to block home sharing would be “a loss in terms of income for the hosts, but also restaurants, the Uber drivers that take them to places they want to visit, any shopping they do,” says Boccia. “The local communities suffer so that Marriott can charge a little bit of a higher price by killing their competition.”

And no doubt they’ll keep taking tax dollars from Maryland residents while they do it.

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