Hidden Camera Catches What Happens When This Officer Approaches A Weary Homeless Man

Police officers are charged with keeping Americans safe and sound. Our communities safety is their number one priority, no matter what else is going on. But too often police officers end up in situations far out of their control and they lose the fundamental sense of duty that is so important. Mesa, Arizona officer Kent Green hasn’t forgotten that sense of duty, not one bit.

He recently spotted a tired, thinning man searching through the trash – presumably looking for something to eat. Kent knew he needed to help this man at a time when so many others would have kept walking.

“We had some deaths from people either falling asleep or camping out in a dumpster, or behind, and then a garbage vehicle comes out and it can end really badly,” he told Runner’s World.

Green, is a runner himself and he noticed the man’s raggedy and hole-filled sneakers. They weren’t in good shape at all and Green had a few pairs lying around his car that he knew he didn’t need.

He grabbed a few pairs, got out of his car and headed over to hand the man some sneakers to warm up his feet. He was doing a kind deed for a resident of the neighborhood without expecting anything in return.

But he didn’t know that Jenny Crider, a local resident was filming his entire good deed on camera! Police officers and cameras have had a bad relationship at times, but this time he couldn’t have been happier.

Good deeds often inspire others to do the same, and Crider managed to share Officer Green’s amazing generosity first-hand. She then shared it online where it went viral and caught the attention of many media outlets.

“This man comes by our complex a few times a week collecting cans to earn money from recycling them. When I went to grab our mail, a police officer drove up and got out to talk to him. I honestly thought he was going to ask him to leave and stop going through the trash,” she wrote in a post.

“When I came back home from getting the mail, the officer had brought out a nice, new pair of shoes to give to the man. It’s the simple, Christlike acts like this that give me hope in this world. Thank you Mesa Police for having such wonderful officers patrol the area!”

Green had no idea anyone saw him until the next day. His friends and family started calling him off the hook and he was totally blown away by all of the attention.

“I had no idea about that until I started getting text messages and messages from dispatch in the days after,” he said in an interview with AZ Family. “We don’t do this, for gratification. We’re not looking for the recognition… We’re looking to do the right thing – the human thing.”

Green also said that he isn’t the only generous officer in the Mesa department. Other officers also donate items like clothing, hygienic products and food for those who need help. Do you feel that the police officers in your community would have your back in a time of need?

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Homeless populations at high risk to develop cardiovascular disease

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Alioto Says Her Past ‘Housing First’ Plan Would End Homelessness

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When She Told Me Her House Only Cost $4,000 I Knew I Had To See The Inside

What if I told you that an Austin-based startup company developed a home that could end the homelessness problem in America? After reading this article, you’ll start to believe it is possible. For just about $4,000, you can download a home, print it and have it up and ready for occupation in less than a day. Isn’t that amazing?

While the company’s printable dwellings are still in the concept phase, they offer a gargantuan opportunity to people who live on the streets or in shelters. Being able to have an affordable place of their own could be a game-changer.

Watch the video below to see the inside!

The homes will first debut in El Salvador. And if they work well there, their use could expand to other parts of the world. And the hope is that billions of people could have a safer and better place to sleep at night.

The homes currently cost about $10,000 and require about 24 hours of building time. But when things get up and running, they could cost as little as $4,000.

The startup company is based in the innovative Austin, Texas. And the home was unveiled at the popular SXSW festival. The house had 650 square feet and a workable inside.

About 1.2 billion people on the planet do not have adequate housing.

A spokesman from the World Resources Institute’s Ross Center for Sustainable Cities said, “History has been punctuated with advances in technology and materials that provide an order-of-magnitude decrease in cost and time required to build a new home. And while recent decades have brought major advances in personal technology, construction practices remain relatively unchanged since the 1950s. Icon aims to change this, ushering in a new era in construction to meet the needs of the future.”

The project is still being figured out. And Icon, the startup, has teamed up with New Story, a nonprofit organization that invests in international housing. Together they plan to introduce this new home to people in need in El Salvador. Over the next 18 months, they hope to build 100 of these affordable homes.

New Story has helped people in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake left millions without adequate housing.

Icon uses a Vulcan printer to create these homes. They create a schematic and upload that into the program. Then the printer takes that blueprint and “prints” the house. Basically, it does the work of contractors by laying the cement.

The model home that was on display in SWSW had a living room, a bathroom, a bedroom, and even an outdoor space (porch). Everything about the home is 3D printed except for the abode’s roof. It was built on the Icon lot. And they plan to use this 3D printed house as more office space so they can further tweak the design and make it better. Hopefully, they will be able to help homeless people sleep better at night very soon.

When prototyping is finished, Icon will relocate their Vulcan printer to El Salvador and start doing good work for people in need.

Do you think this new housing idea could change the world for the better?

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Will Starbucks become America’s largest chain of homeless shelters?

When two young African-American men were arrested in April when they allegedly refused to leave a Philadelphia Starbucks after being told they couldn’t use a restroom because they hadn’t purchased anything, the company was attacked and accused of …

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Starbucks waters down their bathrooms for all policy

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How We Defined Deviancy Down and Got a Culture of Violence

“Was there a part of you that was like, this isn’t real, this would not happen in my school?” A ghoulish ABC television reporter asked a Santa Fe High School student this, expecting a stock answer that would fit the conventional wisdom.

“No there wasn’t,” she replied coolly. “It’s been happening everywhere. I’ve always kind of felt like eventually it was going to happen here too. So, I don’t know. I wasn’t surprised. I was just scared.”

Against our will, we are getting used to the carnage. This time, a spurned fatty given to black Goth-ish clothing and video games fatally shot 10 students and teachers and injured 13 others near Houston. “Surprise!” he shouted, as he jumped from the closet into a classroom, mowing down classmates and a would-be girlfriend.

On national television last weekend, National Rifle Association president-elect Oliver North tried to move public soul-searching towards prescribed drugs and the “culture of violence,” spinning what happened at Santa Fe away from mounting pressure for more gun restrictions. But what does this inadequate phrase even mean? Does North understand what he’s talking about?

“We are getting used to a lot of behavior that is not good for us,” said Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a Harvard professor of education and sociology and then U.S. senator, in his celebrated 1993 American Scholar essay “Defining Deviancy Down.” The nation had been “redefining deviancy so as to exempt much conduct previously stigmatized, and also quietly raising the ‘normal’ level in categories where behavior is now abnormal by any earlier standard,” Moynihan wrote.

Altruism was one broad public response to deepening social pathology, marked by denial, kindness, pity, or guilt, he noted, using as an example the closing of mental hospitals and rise of the homeless. Opportunism, he continued, was a second response, anticipating the advancement of government programs and vast, often lucrative social service, therapy, and diversity franchises, all of which would be “jeopardized if any serious effort were made to reduce the deviancy in question.”

This self-interest led to “assorted strategies for redefining the behavior in question as not all that deviant, really,” and to a third response, normalization, adapting to crime and violence, getting used to widespread coarseness and nihilism.

Moynihan wrote his essay 25 years ago. The insane and wayward—increasingly freed from stigma and shame—today terrify functional America even more so than in his time, on account of their shamelessness as well as increasing prevalence.

Homicidal gun violence is to a large degree a ghetto affair. Illegal and unlicensed handguns are the nation’s major killing machine. School menace is embodied in the angry lout in the suburban high school parking lot and seething introvert in the darkened bedroom. His ear buds are on, and his smartphone is turned up full-blast to hate rap.

Music is a leading indicator of the “culture of violence.” Primer 55’s Introduction to Mayhem, for example, produced in 2000, is a heavy metal classic from the Island Def Jam Music Group, standard teenage boy fare. The cuts include “Dose,” “The Big Fuck You,” “Violence,” “Hate,” “Tripinthehead,” “Loose,” “Something Wicked This Way Comes,” “Supa Freak Love,” “Chaos,” “Pigs,” “Stain,” and “Revolution.”

The “culture of violence” is box office. And if Island Def Jam has been selling socio-cultural poison like this for two decades, isn’t legendary record producer and Malibu guru Rick Rubin, 55, who is worth an estimated $250 million, worthy of at least disgrace, not Hollywood and public adulation?

Violent music, video games, and depraved entertainment are cash machines. Electronic tools provide America’s youth—and their parents—with easy, possibly irresistible portals to the dark side. The weakening of families and religion-based communities contribute to the void. So do social media and porn. Unstable adolescents, if they are identified and treated, get medicated on the chance that anti-depressants or uppers will do their mood magic. Drugs—legal and illegal and everything in between—are palliatives for Americans of all ages.

Sometimes there’s official neglect or bad local policy, as with Parkland student Nicholas Cruz. But most educators are doing their best. The really damaged kids, the heartbreakers and the throwaways, the deranged and the dangerous, are given over to social workers, foster parents, or the police, but under the circumstances no one expects much to come from the interventions.

I wasn’t surprised, the Santa Fe High School student said. I was just scared. And, really, shouldn’t we all be feeling the same way?

Gilbert T. Sewall is co-author of After Hiroshima: The United States Since 1945 and editor of The Eighties: A Reader.

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Starbucks’s Stupid Policy

When I lived in New York, and would give my houseguests tips for navigating the city on their own, I told them that yes, public toilets are hard to find, but if you buy something at Starbucks, you can use the toilet there. It’s worth it when you really have to go.

It has always struck me as a fair trade. No coffee shop in a heavily trafficked area can afford to let its bathrooms be used by anybody who walks in. In Manhattan, there would be a never-ending stream of tourists lined up in the joint, waiting to use the toilet, and buying nothing.

Besides, cafes, bars, and restaurants are not public spaces, in the sense that a park is. You want to use the facilities or hang out at Starbucks? Then buy something. Sit for hours if you like, nursing that cup of black coffee, but buy the thing. It’s only fair to the merchant. I will go work sometimes for hours in Starbucks, and only buy a single cappuccino. I consider that I’m renting the space — and given the price of their speciality drinks, I call it a bargain.

I’m afraid Starbucks has allowed itself to be bullied into adopting a policy that is going to ruin the experience of being there for lots of customers, especially in its dense urban locations. From the Wall Street Journal:

Starbucks Corp. tried to dig itself out of controversy Monday by attempting to clarify a policy toward nonpaying guests that generated an onslaught of weekend criticism.

The Seattle-based retailer on Saturday had said it would allow all guests in its U.S. company-owned stores to use its cafes, including its restrooms, whether or not they make a purchase. That announcement, which attracted some support, also drew complaints that cafes wouldn’t have enough seats for paying customers and would turn into homeless shelters and drug havens.

On Monday, Starbucks revealed more about the policy, telling The Wall Street Journal that employees now have detailed instructions on what to do if someone is behaving in a disruptive manner, such as smoking, using drugs or alcohol, using restrooms improperly or sleeping.

At issue, in essence, is whether Starbucks views itself as a business that caters to customers, or a quasi-public place generally welcome to all. The uproar, which follows the arrest last month of two black men who wanted to use a Starbucks bathroom in Philadelphia, demonstrates the unusual spot that the nation’s biggest coffee chain holds in American culture.

While many other restaurants and retailers also must manage the issue of lingering customers and nonpaying guests who come in to use restrooms, Starbucks has promoted itself as providing a “third place” between home and work where people can freely exchange ideas. It essentially pioneered the idea that is now generating controversy.

If the homeless, especially the mentally ill homeless, start to settle down in Starbucks shops, most of the paying customers will leave. This summer, if Starbucks stores in Manhattan fill up with tourists lined up to use the toilet, going there to drink coffee will be an unpleasant experience. So people will find other alternatives.

I’m in Starbucks a lot. I’d prefer to work on principle in CC’s, the locally owned chain, but the coffee is better at Starbucks. But if the new policy causes my local Starbucks to turn into an unpleasant place, I’ll just go to CC’s. So will everybody else.

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