Stacey Abrams becomes first black female nominee for governor

Victory in Georgia’s Democratic primary is among most consequential in series of triumphs by female candidates ahead of midterm elections

For the first time in the US, voters have chosen a black woman as nominee for state governor after Stacey Abrams declared victory in Georgia’s Democratic primary.

Abrams – a former state House minority leader and progressive who earned support from both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders – beat Stacey Evans, also a former state representative. The result was among the most consequential in a series of primaries that brought successes for female candidates across the country ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

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Nolte: Hillary Clinton Snubs Women with Andrew Cuomo Endorsement

Hillary Clinton had a choice between endorsing incumbent Gov. Mario Cuomo (D-NY) or his upstart rival for the Democrat nomination, Sex and the City actress Cynthia Nixon, who would not only be the first woman governor of the Empire State, but the first gay governor. Hillary chose the old white guy.

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Stacey Abrams becomes nation’s first black female nominee for governor

House Minority Leader for the Georgia General Assembly and State Representative, Stacey Abrams delivers a speech on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia.
(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

ATLANTA (AP) — In Georgia’s gubernatorial primary, Democrats elected the state’s first woman nominee from either party, but no Republican candidate could gather more than 50 percent of the vote — so the top two face a July runoff.

If Stacey Abrams wins in November, she’ll become the first black woman governor in the U.S.

She will face either Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle or Secretary of State Brian Kemp. Their runoff is scheduled for July 24.

Abrams beat former state Rep. Stacey Evans. The one-time legislative colleagues tussled over ethics accusations and their records on education. Both are Atlanta-area attorneys. Abrams got a last-minute boost with an endorsement — in the form of a 60-second robo-call — from Hillary Clinton.

In the Republican race, Cagle and Kemp beat three GOP rivals in a race characterized by strong support for gun rights and tough talk on immigration. The field was all white men – former legislators, officeholders and businessmen, some with decades of political experience and others positioning themselves as outsiders challenging the establishment.

In the ballroom of a downtown Atlanta hotel, Abrams supporters trickled in to a soundtrack of R&B and hip-hop songs. Two young women — one black and one white and both wearing shirts reading “Elect Black Women” — huddled over a table as Rihanna’s “Diamonds” played in the background.

At Cagle’s gathering in Gainesville, he walked through a crowd of supporters shaking hands, offering hugs and taking selfies while country singer Tyler Hammond performed on stage.

In Athens, supporters of Kemp streamed into the upstairs ballroom of the Holiday Inn to await returns.

The candidates are vying to succeed term-limited Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, who has held the office since 2011.

All of Georgia’s statewide constitutional offices are up for grabs this election cycle, including those vacated by Cagle and Kemp, as well as the position of insurance commissioner vacated by Ralph Hudgens, who isn’t seeking re-election.

Georgia’s 180 state House and 56 state Senate seats are also up for a vote.

Five of Georgia’s U.S. House members face primary challengers.

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Hillary Clinton acolytes adopt Bernie Sanders agenda to drag Democrats left

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House Republicans to call for second special counsel to investigate alleged FISA abuse, Hillary Clinton probe

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Left’s history of sabotage

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Why I’m So Proud Meghan Markle Made the Royal Wedding Unapologetically Black

My father is Black, and my mother is Puerto Rican. As a biracial woman, I’m very familiar with questions like, “What are you?” “But what do you consider yourself?” and insinuations of “But is she really Black?” {snip} For some people, regardless of their race (and sometimes even my own friends and family) it’s apparently very difficult to understand the concept that a person can proudly embrace and claim two cultures and races with open arms. But obviously, I love both of my parents equally. {snip}

Meghan Markle is not a stranger to this narrative. The daughter of a white father and a Black mother, she has spoken and even written about the complications that have come with her racial ambiguity. {snip} Even in her engagement interview with BBC — which should have been about nothing but her newfound happiness — Markle had to address the attention on her race, calling it “disheartening” and “a shame.”

So on the day of her wedding, Markle could have washed her hands of all of the drama, controversy, and speculation surrounding her identity. After all, Markle is very light-skinned, and many viewers of her work on Suits often assumed that she was white until the show included her character’s Black father in a storyline. Because of her physical appearance, she could have had a wedding where race was not at all a factor, a by-the-book Royal Wedding that stuck to tradition and history. Instead, she made sure her Blackness was front and center. She and Prince Harry brought in Reverend Michael Bruce Curry, the Black man who is the head of the Episcopal church, to deliver a passionate sermon. And then a Black gospel choir brought the house down with a powerful rendition of “Stand By Me,” and 19-year-old Black cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason performed. {snip}

In his moving sermon, Curry — who came to London from Chicago for the occasion — did not miss the opportunity to mark how historic it was that a Black bishop was delivering the message at the wedding of the first Black royal. {snip}

And then came the The Kingdom Choir, a UK-based group of powerhouse vocalists, many of whom were women donning natural hair and locs with their Sunday best. That alone was enough to bring me to tears; Black women have never been present at this type of event, much less asked to perform at one. {snip}

The level of inclusivity at the wedding shouldn’t be surprising, however, when we consider Markle’s passion for activism and change-making. {snip} And in 2015, she revealed at the UN Women’s Conference that as an 11-year-old, she wrote letters to then-First Lady Hillary Clinton, journalist Linda Ellerbee, and attorney Gloria Allred about a liquid dish soap commercial with the tagline: “Women all over America are fighting greasy pots and pans.” Markle received encouraging letters back from Clinton and crew, and a month later Proctor & Gamble had changed the message in the commercial. {snip}

{snip}

I’ve talked a lot about why it’s meaningful not just to me, but to popular culture that Markle is Black, both in stories and in conversations. Many people have asked why, if we want race to no longer be a factor in spaces like the palace, I choose to talk so much about Markle’s race, especially when she’s gotten so much flack for it. Shouldn’t we just call her a princess? Why does she have to a Black princess? But before this Royal Wedding, girls like me — and Markle’s mother, and the women in the Kingdom Choir — had never been included in fairy tale visions of royalty. Yesterday, however, Black women, biracial women, marginalized women, and women who are simply other went from outsiders to having a seat at the royal table — in front of millions of people.

So yes, Meghan Markle’s mere existence in the royal family is revolutionary. {snip} It felt as though she were saying: No one can define our identities for us. No one can force us to choose one side or the other. No one can say that we don’t belong, or that we don’t deserve fairy tale moments.

And that is exactly why she is the Black princess the world needs.

And then came the The Kingdom Choir, a UK-based group of powerhouse vocalists, many of whom were women donning natural hair and locs with their Sunday best. That alone was enough to bring me to tears; Black women have never been present at this type of event, much less asked to perform at one. And honey, those ladies came to sang. The only thing that moved me more than their goosebump-raising vocals in that gorgeous church was watching Markle’s Black mother look on emotionally with pride — while rocking locs and a nose ring, a look I also know has never made its way into a space like St. George’s Chapel.

The level of inclusivity at the wedding shouldn’t be surprising, however, when we consider Markle’s passion for activism and change-making. During that same engagement interview with the BBC last year, Markle also took the opportunity to point out that she doesn’t feel she’s giving anything up by ending her acting her career. Quite the opposite, in fact, she said: “Once you have access or a voice that people are going to listen to, with that comes a lot of responsibility, which I take seriously.” And in 2015, she revealed at the UN Women’s Conference that as an 11-year-old, she wrote letters to then-First Lady Hillary Clinton, journalist Linda Ellerbee, and attorney Gloria Allred about a liquid dish soap commercial with the tagline: “Women all over America are fighting greasy pots and pans.” Markle received encouraging letters back from Clinton and crew, and a month later Proctor & Gamble had changed the message in the commercial. In her speech at the UN about that early lesson, Markle said: “It was at that moment that I realized the magnitude of my actions.”

“Yesterday, Black women, biracial women, marginalized women, and women who are simply other went from outsiders to having a seat at the royal table — in front of millions of people.”

I’ve talked a lot about why it’s meaningful not just to me, but to popular culture that Markle is Black, both in stories and in conversations. Many people have asked why, if we want race to no longer be a factor in spaces like the palace, I choose to talk so much about Markle’s race, especially when she’s gotten so much flack for it. Shouldn’t we just call her a princess? Why does she have to a Black princess? But before this Royal Wedding, girls like me — and Markle’s mother, and the women in the Kingdom Choir — had never been included in fairy tale visions of royalty. Yesterday, however, Black women, biracial women, marginalized women, and women who are simply other went from outsiders to having a seat at the royal table — in front of millions of people.

So yes, Meghan Markle’s mere existence in the royal family is revolutionary. But as both a Black woman, a biracial woman, and a woman, period, I am bursting with pride at the way she is indeed realizing the magnitude of her actions and using her overwhelmingly large new platform to create change. Including not just a Black bishop, but a gospel choir at the royal wedding felt like a very deliberate nod from Prince Harry, yes, but particularly from Markle to the rest of the world. To me, it felt like Markle was sending a very powerful and very personal message to girls like us. It felt as though she were saying: No one can define our identities for us. No one can force us to choose one side or the other. No one can say that we don’t belong, or that we don’t deserve fairy tale moments.

And that is exactly why she is the Black princess the world needs.

The post Why I’m So Proud Meghan Markle Made the Royal Wedding Unapologetically Black appeared first on American Renaissance.

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How the FBI’s October surprise changed polls and flipped the script in the final days of the election

The October surprise shrank Hillary Clinton’s lead in the polls and flipped the partisan rancor surrounding FBI Director James Comey. The Democratic nominee had lost 2.8 percentage points Sunday from the 4.6% lead she held Oct. 28 over Republican nominee …

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