Poland’s consumption binge will meet a painful end – AEI – American Enterprise Institute: Freedom, Opportunity, Enterprise

Is Poland experiencing an economic miracle or a bubble waiting to burst? According to Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, “Poland is on a good path to reach EU average income within 10 to 15 years.” On the surface, the stars seem to be aligned. Economic growth was solid in 2017, at 4.6 per cent, and the government anticipates another strong year in 2018. But there is a catch. More than anything else, Polish growth reflects a growth of consumption, which accounted for 76.3 per cent of gross domestic product in 2017, especially private consumption fueled by entitlement schemes introduced since 2015 by the governing Law and Justice Party.

True, exports expanded too in response to a favourable economic environment in Europe. But in the light of the slowdown seen in the eurozone in the first few months of the year, that growth is unlikely to be sustainable. Worse still, the current GDP growth forecast of 4.3 per cent is based on an unrealistic assumption of investment growth of 8.7 per cent — more than double the 1998-2013 average. The government’s jubilation is not shared by the country’s financial markets. The key stock market index, the WIG, is down more than 5 per cent over the past year, a period during which even Russia’s RTS index has risen 12.3 per cent, notwithstanding that country’s lacklustre economic performance. Markets might be wrong but they do anticipate a downturn. The list of possible concerns is long.

Keep reading at Financial Times

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Almost all species on Earth today came into being at about the same time, scientific study declares

What David Thaler of the University of Basel in Switzerland said about a scientific study he co-authored — and that was just published by journal Human Evolution — underscores how shocking his findings were even to him.

“This conclusion is very surprising,” he told Agence France-Presse, “and I fought against it as hard as I could.”

What’s so surprising?

Thaler and his co-author Mark Stoeckle of the Rockefeller University in New York discovered that nine out of 10 species on Earth today, including humans, came into being at roughly the same time — 100,000 to 200,000 years ago, AFP reported.

In other words, 90 percent of animal life — genetically speaking — is about the same age, the outlet noted.

Furthermore, the pair’s study turns on its head the long-held notion that species with large populations spread over the globe — again, humans, for example — will become more genetically diverse over time, AFP said.

But Stoeckle told the outlet that’s not the case, noting that animal genetic diversity is generally “about the same.”

It’s all in DNA ‘barcodes’

The scientists analyzed DNA “barcodes” across 100,000 species and found a sign that showed almost all animals emerged about the same time as humans, AFP reported.

More from the outlet:

What they saw was a lack of variation in so-called “neutral” mutations, which are the slight changes in DNA across generations that neither help nor hurt an individual’s chances of survival.

In other words, they were irrelevant in terms of the natural and sexual drivers of evolution.

How similar or not these “neutral” mutations are to each other is like tree rings — they reveal the approximate age of a species.

Which brings us back to our question: why did the overwhelming majority of species in existence today emerge at about the same time?

Some theories are offered (but not the one you’re probably thinking)

Jesse Ausubel, director of the Program for the Human Environment at the Rockefeller University, told AFP that environmental trauma is one possibility.

“Viruses, ice ages, successful new competitors, loss of prey — all these may cause periods when the population of an animal drops sharply,” he told the outlet in reference to the study. “In these periods, it is easier for a genetic innovation to sweep the population and contribute to the emergence of a new species.”

Stoeckle offered to AFP that “the simplest interpretation is that life is always evolving. It is more likely that — at all times in evolution — the animals alive at that point arose relatively recently.”

More from the outlet:

In this view, a species only lasts a certain amount of time before it either evolves into something new or goes extinct.

And yet — another unexpected finding from the study — species have very clear genetic boundaries, and there’s nothing much in between.

“If individuals are stars, then species are galaxies,” said Thaler. “They are compact clusters in the vastness of empty sequence space.”

The absence of “in-between” species is something that also perplexed Darwin, he said.

Read more from The Blaze…

Arizona Senate Puts Coal Tax Relief Bill on Hold

A bill to provide tax relief for Arizona’s Navajo Generating Station (NGS) by exempting income derived from coal mining from the state’s transaction privilege tax (TPT) was held up in the Arizona Senate’s Finance Committee with the legislation falling one vote short of passage.

The bill’s sponsors are working to gain additional support before bringing it up for reconsideration in the wake of the March 14 setback.

Native-American Workforce

NGS, a 2,250-megawatt coal-fired power plant located on the Navajo Nation reservation near Page, Arizona, is the largest electricity power generator in the state. NGS operates under a lease agreement with the Navajo Nation, supplying electricity to customers in Arizona, California, and Nevada. It also provides the power needed to pump water for agriculture and municipal uses from the Colorado River to Phoenix and Tucson through the Central Arizona Project.

The plant is jointly owned by the Salt River Project and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, who own the largest percentages of the installation, and the Arizona Public Service Co., NV Energy, and Tucson Electric Power, who have smaller shares. NGS employs more than 400 full-time staff, 90 percent of whom are Navajo.

NGS uses coal from the Kayenta Mine, operated by Peabody Western Coal Company under lease agreements with the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe. The coal is delivered to NGS by a 75-mile electric railroad owned and operated by the plant. Ninety-nine percent of the mine’s 340 employees are Native American.

‘A Tax Elimination’

Arizona’s TPT taxes companies’ gross receipts in 16 separate business classifications, including mining, retail, telecommunications, and utilities. Arizona also allows municipalities to levy local TPTs.

HB 2003 would exempt coal from the retail and mining classifications under the state TPT and any municipal TPT and sales taxes. A Fiscal Note prepared for HB 2003 estimated although the proposed exemptions would reduce Arizona’s General Fund by $9.1 million in Fiscal Year 2019, the ongoing revenue loss from a closed NGS would be $12.2 million.

State Rep. Mark Finchem (R-Tucson), HB 2003’s sponsor, says TPT never should have been imposed on coal mining.

“This is … a tax elimination,” said Finchem. “The state does not collect a [TPT] on the wind, the sun, or the water, nor does it collect the tax on natural gas and nuclear fuels, … [so the TPT on coal] never should have been laid.”

Fails Tax Tests

John Nothdurft, director of government relations at The Heartland Institute, which publishes Environment & Climate News, testified HB 2003 would improve energy markets in the state, during a hearing before Arizona House Ways and Means Committee on February 14.

“Arizona’s transaction privilege tax … [is] dissimilar to how other states tax raw materials used to produce energy, such as coal, natural gas, and other fossil fuels,” Nothdurft testified. “Sound tax policy generally abides by four basic principles: It is applied to a broad base; kept at a competitive, low rate; it is non-distorting; and rate-setting and the regulatory process are completely transparent to the state’s citizens.

“Arizona’s transaction privilege tax fails on at least three, if not all four, of these principles,” Nothdurft said.

High Closing Costs

Nothdurft also testified failure to implement the proposed tax reform might cause NGS to close, which would increase energy prices in Arizona.

“Thirty-one percent of Arizona’s electricity generation comes from coal, but this would significantly decrease if NGS is closed,” said Nothdurft. “This is a significant problem, since the cost of coal electricity is much cheaper than other forms of electricity—especially wind and solar, which are heavily subsidized and yet remain more expensive.”

Severe Power Disruptions Forecast

Fred Palmer, a senior fellow at The Heartland Institute, says ending TPT for coal mining would benefit all of Arizona.

“HB 2003 is designed to help extend the commercial life of NGS, a crucial resource for the economic future of the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe, as well as water users, electric consumers, and agricultural interests in Arizona,” Palmer said. “Since a closed NGS will produce no mining tax revenues, opposition to the bill can only be construed as anti-Native, anti-fossil fuels, and anti-growth.”

A recent study by utility consulting firm Quanta Technology confirms NGS is critical to the power supply in the Southwest.

The report states closing NGS in 2019 would result in “power deficiencies which could evolve into potential voltage collapse and outages, load shedding triggers, potential rotating brownouts, failing transformers or transmission lines and equipment damage” affecting Phoenix, Flagstaff, other large Arizona cities, and California cities such as Lugo and Shandon.

Confident in Bill’s Prospects

Although HB 2003 stalled in the Senate Finance Committee, Carlyle Begay, a Navajo and former Arizona state senator for the district where NGS is located, says he is confident HB 2003 will eventually pass.

Finance Committee member Warren Petersen (R-Gilbert), who initially withheld support for the bill, which kept it from moving out of the committee, now supports the proposal, Begay says.

In addition, “we will have enough Democrat votes to pass the bill through the Senate,” Begay said. “The commitment will be in place in case we need it.”

Editor’s Note: This article was published in cooperation with The Heartland Institute’s Environment & Climate News.

PHOTO: The Arizona Capitol Museum building in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

The post Arizona Senate Puts Coal Tax Relief Bill on Hold appeared first on New Revere Daily Press.

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Banter #317: Phillip Lohaus on military challenges in the Asia Pacific – AEI – American Enterprise Institute: Freedom, Opportunity, Enterprise

This week on Banter, AEI Research Fellow Phill Lohaus joins the show to discuss the security environment in the Asia Pacific. Phill is cohosting an event with his colleague Tom Donnelly on June 1 featuring a panel of security experts discussing how the United States can keep its competitive edge in the Asia Pacific. You can livestream that event or catch the full event video at the link below.

Learn More:

Military challenges in the Asia Pacific: US responses to regional competition | Phillip Lohaus and Thomas Donelly | AEI Public Event | June 1, 2018

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European Commission Proposes Updating Rules Governing Alcohol Excise Duties

The European Commission has proposed to reshape the rules governing excise duty on alcohol within the EU, paving the way for a better business environment and reduced costs for small alcohol-producing businesses and better protection for consumer health.

Read more from European Commission…

California lawmakers vote to expand gun restraining orders — but ACLU says bill goes too far

California, and a handful of other states, have laws that allow family members, roommates, and law enforcement to request a restraining order to remove firearms from an individual who has shown signs of dangerous behavior.

On Monday, according to KOVR-TV, California lawmakers voted in favor of a bill expanding that power to employers, co-workers and school personnel.

ACLU, Republicans join in opposition

But the American Civil Liberties Union, rarely a conservative ally, says the bill goes too far, and joined some California Republicans in expressing concern over the measure.

The ACLU said in a statement that measures restricting those with mental health issues from buying or owning a gun “are too often not evidence-based, reinforce negative stereotypes, and raise significant equal protection, due process, and privacy issues.”

“It is not hard to imagine a scenario in which someone might harbor a bias of an irrational fear of a coworker based on that coworker belonging to some minority group that the person dislikes or distrusts,” ACLU advocate Lizzie Bunchen wrote, according to KCRA-TV. “The person subjected to the restraining order is not informed of the court proceeding and therefore has no opportunity to contest the allegations.”

That position aligns the ACLU with gun rights advocacy groups like the Firearm Policy Coalition, which supports the general idea behind the bill but has concerns about civil liberties.

“It is very dangerous when you go after someone’s liberty for some perceived security,” the FPC’s Craig DeLuz said, KCRA reported. “We want to do what we can to make sure we keep firearms out of the hands of individuals who can potentially be a danger to themselves or others. But in any case, we must always be careful of violating civil liberties.”

The sponsor defends his bill

Democratic Assemblyman Phil Ting, who sponsored the bill, said the expansion is necessary to cover adults who don’t have connections with family and who live alone.

“Once you move away from home and you’re an adult, you may not spend time with your family,” Ting told the Huffington Post. “You may not have much interaction with law enforcement, but chances are if you’re working, you see your co-workers every day for eight-plus hours a day, and you’re with them not just in the work environment but socially.”

The bill passed the state Assembly 48-25, and will now head to the Senate.

Read more from The Blaze…

PM Stuart defends his stewardship of Barbados ahead of general election

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, CMC – Prime Minister Freundel Stuart defended the stewardship of his administration over the last five years, telling Barbadians that difficult situations had required “hard choices”. Stuart, who is leading his Democratic Labour Party into the general election tomorrow, said that the country has had to navigate a difficult global economic environment and that despite that, the policies of his administration were bearing fruit.

Read more from Antigua and Barbuda…

What explains this incredible bubble?

Dear reader,

Our May issue was all about the state of education in America…

And today, we bring you an essay that we couldn’t fit in the magazine… It’s the “missing chapter” that explains the history and rationale behind the incredible rise in student-loan debt.

Read on for more…

Good Intentions and Fiscal Recklessness

By Bryan Beach, financial analyst

Over the past 10 years, students (most of whom have virtually no income) have racked up enormous debts. As of 2017, student debt totals more than $1.5 trillion – the second-largest source of household debt after home mortgages.

Incredibly, that’s what our entire federal government owed a little more than 30 years ago. Virtually all this money was borrowed in only the last 10 years.

The average college student graduates with more than $30,000 in debt… and by his late twenties, has racked up more than $6,000 in credit-card debt. Meanwhile, median earnings for Americans aged 25-34 are $36,000-$40,000.

Can you imagine starting out your adult life with a personal debt-to-income level at close to 100%? What does this say about the state of our economy? What does this say about the state of our culture?

All the signs show that the debt piled on our youth will become another catastrophic bubble in the American economy.

This expansion had nothing to do with real supply and demand or the creation of value. Instead, it was simply an outgrowth of the government’s good intentions and fiscal recklessness…

The government first got into the student-loan business in the late 1950s. President Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower decided the U.S. needed to mint a lot of new engineers and scientists to catch up with the Soviet Union’s first successful efforts in space. So the federal government began providing low-interest-rate college loans to America’s best and brightest…

Then in 1965, Lyndon Johnson changed the focus from national defense to social welfare. As part of the “Great Society” initiatives, the new Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) gave loans to low-income students.

More important, Johnson changed the way the government financed the loans. Instead of loaning students money directly, FFELP loans would be made by banks… but the government would still pick up the tab on defaults. That created an environment where banks could recklessly lend, without any risk of default.

In 1972, Richard Nixon and Congress created the Student Loan Marketing Association (better known as “Sallie Mae”) to service these debts. In 1984, its shares began trading on the New York Stock Exchange. Ultimately, Sallie Mae “privatized,” formally cutting its ties with the U.S. government. As we’ll show you, no entity would profit more from Johnson’s gravy train.

Student loans grew steadily and – for the most part – slowly, until around 1992, when the U.S. Congress decided to include for-profit institutions in the official definition of “institution of higher learning.” Suddenly, “for-profit” colleges were eligible to receive financial aid. Two years later, the for-profit University of Phoenix went public… backed by Wall Street’s money.

By 2000, for-profits were spending tens of millions of dollars lobbying in Washington, and the government began encouraging more citizens to pursue higher education.

How Lenders Can Exploit a Broken System

As the 2007-2008 mortgage crisis showed… when you shield lenders and borrowers from the consequences of reckless behavior, they act recklessly. This is the definition of “moral hazard.”

And as you’ll see, the student-loan program has become one vast moral hazard…

For years, Sallie Mae’s business model churned out mountains of cash. It was impossible not to. Sallie Mae got to borrow from government agencies at miniscule rates, loan it to borrowers for high rates… and if the deal went bad, the taxpayers were on the hook.

Starting in the 1990s, politicians began pressing to eliminate the system’s moral hazard by going back to the Sputnik-era direct-loan system. But Sallie Mae and the for-profit colleges were a powerful lobbying force and fended off legislative changes for nearly 15 years.

By 2010, the gig was up. As part of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, Congress established that the only entity able to issue government-backed loans would be the U.S. government. That meant Sallie Mae could no longer originate loans backed by the U.S. government. Its gravy train had ended.

To fill the void left by originating FFELP loans, Sallie Mae turned up the heat on another revenue stream – servicing loans held by others. Uncle Sam doesn’t want to be bothered with actually collecting payments. Sallie Mae was happy to do that for a fee.

Sallie Mae quickly recognized that collecting payments on active accounts was a lousy, low-margin business. To really make money in the servicing business, you had to collect delinquent accounts.

This created a new moral hazard… Sallie Mae had no incentive to keep loans current. So it treated the borrowers like dirt. According to various filed and settled claims, Sallie Mae employees intentionally sent confusing or misleading correspondence. They neglected to tell borrowers about loan relief they were entitled to. They called them dozens of times, day and night.

The company’s “bad cop” tactics infuriated borrowers, often making them even less likely to pay. This played right into Sallie Mae’s hands. Once a borrower moved from the “small fee” service-revenue bucket to the “fat percentage” delinquency bucket… Sallie Mae turned on the charm. It brought in its “good cops,” who cooperated with the customers and collected the cash.

It worked. Sallie Mae regularly generated $300 million-$500 million a year in “Contingency Revenue.”

The Tide Turns Against Sallie Mae

Eventually, Sallie Mae’s tactics caught up with it. Frustrated constituents began writing their congressmen. Various media outlets reported on Sallie Mae’s deplorable customer-satisfaction statistics. Thousands of people followed the “I HATE SALLIE MAE” Facebook page. Finally, when it became news that the company had specifically targeted 78,000 military servicemen with its predatory practices… Sallie Mae was officially in Washington’s crosshairs.

The government passed various measures – primarily from 2007-2013 – to ease the borrowers’ burden, including:

  • Allowing students to put off payments if they attend graduate school.
  • Capping the exorbitant “Contingency Fee” plan.
  • Holding servicers accountable for how they treated customers.
  • Implementing “Income-Based Repayment” (“IBR”) and “Pay as You Earn” plans, which cap payments at a percentage of disposable income… or allow borrowers at a certain income level to cease payments altogether. Often, any balances not repaid after 20 years will be forgiven.
  • Allowing graduate students to essentially borrow unlimited amounts under various federal programs (in contrast to capped undergraduate loans).
  • Creating a “not-for-profit loophole,” which forgives the entire outstanding balance after 10 years for any graduate student who becomes a teacher, public defender, or works at a not-for-profit organization.

As always… the government’s best intentions simply gave borrowers license to act recklessly. It shifted the “moral hazard” from the lenders to the borrowers.

Take Bonnie Kurowski-Alicea, a chronic borrower who managed to run up a $209,000 tab earning a doctorate from Capella University in “Industrial Organizational Psychology.” Bonnie couldn’t find a job after earning her online undergraduate degree, so she compounded the problem by piling one useless degree on top of the other. As the Wall Street Journal pointed out, “Dr.” Kurowski-Alicea’s main motivation for earning master’s and doctorate degrees was to postpone repaying her student loans. Her unemployed husband has $75,000 of student loans himself.

Then there’s Virginia Murphy. Her tuition at Tulane Law School was nearly $150,000, and she racked up federal loans of around $250,000 to take care of living expenses. According to the Wall Street Journal, Murphy never had any intention of paying the money back. Loan forgiveness was “the only reason (she) even considered” going to law school. Thanks to the IBR program, Murphy’s monthly payment doesn’t even cover the interest… which means her outstanding balance actually increases every month. As a public defender, her loan balance will be forgiven after 10 years… at which point the outstanding balance will have ballooned to more than $300,000.

The “not-for-profit loophole” was intended for folks like Murphy who, by serving the community as a public defender, is presumably forgoing more lucrative opportunities in the private sector.

But most of the forgiven “not-for-profit” loans will benefit doctors and surgeons. People like Emily Van Kirk and her husband, who managed to rack up $700,000 of debt while attending medical school in St. Maarten. Much of this balance will be forgiven as – like a lot of doctors – the couple plans on working in hospitals. (Uncle Sam must have forgotten that almost 80% of hospitals are “not for profit”… leaving a loophole a mile wide for some of the workforce’s highest wage-earners.)

Many student loans went to honest people who plan on paying back every penny they borrowed.

But some… an awful lot, in fact… had no such plan. Hundreds of billions of dollars in student debt is out there that won’t be or can’t be repaid. And the result is going to be a disaster.

Regards,

Bryan Beach

***

 

If you’re interested in reading more about America’s debt bubble, we recommend the new book, The American Jubilee

Massive amounts of debt have been piled on the weakest in our society. The poor – and especially the young and poor in our country – have no hope of being able to afford the American dream anymore.

When this bubble breaks, it will be an entire generation of young Americans who will suffer.

And it’s not just the size of Americans’ debts that’s the problem… It’s who owes the money that’s the bigger concern. When the rich get in trouble with debt, it’s an economic problem. But when the poor and middle class get in trouble with debt, it’s a political problem.

That’s what makes a national “Debt Jubilee” inevitable. To read more about this problem, click here.

Now on to the latest news…

Far more Americans are having trouble “keeping up” than you realize…

Exclusive: 40% in U.S. can’t afford middle-class basics

At a time of rock-bottom joblessness, high corporate profits, and a booming stock market, more than 40% of U.S. households cannot pay the basics of a middle-class lifestyle.

A fantastic read from American Consequences contributor Matt Labash about writer and reporter Charlie LeDuff in Detroit…

A Little Bit of Real People

“I got love for people,” he says without guile, not a pronouncement you hear generally misanthropic reporters make every day. Charlie saw the Hole getting deeper – more and more falling prey to the effects of corporate greed, government neglect, or personal dissolution.

In the meantime, the New Yorker is reporting on rich folks eating gilded food…

Twenty-Four-Karat Chicken Wings and the Allure of Eating Gold

The whole point of eating Ainsworth’s wings (or the gold-leaf donut that was once sold in Brooklyn, or the maki roll dressed in gilded nori in Tokyo), by contrast, is the languid extravagance of destroying value.Robert Shiller warns on cryptocurrencies with a look back at the rise of “time money” in the 1800s…

The Old Allure of New Money

New ideas for money seem to go with the territory of revolution, accompanied by a compelling, easily understood narrative…Infighting and disorganization inside a left-leaning grassroots group… 

Bernie’s army in disarray

‘Our Revolution’ has shown no ability to tip a major Democratic election in its favor — despite possessing Sanders’ email list, the envy of the Democratic Party — and can claim no major wins in 2018 as its own.

 

Read our latest issues of American Consequences by clicking here.

And let us know what you’re reading at [email protected].

Regards,

Steven Longenecker
With P.J. O’Rourke and the American Consequences Editorial Staff
May 23, 2018

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Flint activist and stay-at-home mom wins the Goldman Environmental Prize

A stay-at-home mother of four children just won an award often described as the Nobel Prize for the environment. LeeAnne Walters earned the Goldman Environmental Prize for her work spearheading a citizens’ movement to test Flint, Michigan tap water …

Read more from LeeAnne Walters…

More scenes from the decline of Evergreen State College

Last week I wrote about Evergreen State College’s decline in enrollment which is expected to blow a $5.9 million hole in the schools budget for the coming year. A memo outlining the school’s response said some vacancies would remain unfilled and a number of layoffs would be necessary. Today, a piece published by the Wall Street Journal reveals some additional detail on what is coming for Evergreen, including a lawsuit which will be filed this week:

[Police Chief Stacy] Brown ultimately resigned, and this week plans to file a tort claim alleging a hostile work environment. Mr. Weinstein and his wife, who also taught at Evergreen, filed a similar lawsuit last fall. The college demanded their resignation as a condition of its $500,000 settlement.

Chief Brown resigned her position last August after clashing with President Bridges over how best to secure the campus. Brown had been targeted by student protesters from the moment she was sworn in. Students argued that the progressive campus should have no police force or, if it had one, the police should be unarmed at all times. Here’s hoping she wins a large settlement. The WSJ piece goes on to specify the kind of staffing cuts Evergreen is now facing:

Applications for fall 2018 are down 20%. Sandra Kaiser, Evergreen’s vice president for college relations, claims the low application and enrollment numbers may not be as bad as they look because many students commit to Evergreen “at the last moment.”…

Based on fall 2018 enrollment projections, nearly 25 full-time adjuncts will lose their jobs, provost Jennifer Drake wrote in a Feb. 15 email.

It’s worth noting that the $5.9 million budget cut was based on a projected 10% drop in enrollment. If the drop is closer to 20%, the impact on the budget is going to be more significant. While the school is still deflecting as to the reasons for the enrollment decline, the WSJ piece makes clear even some progressive parents of current students felt things had gotten out of hand.

Kirsten Shockey of Oregon had her son enrolled at Evergreen. Her daughter was considering going there too, but after watching the school’s response last year, she dropped it from her list. She tells the WSJ, “The way identity politics played out looked to us like a university going from a place of learning to a new type of anti-intellectualism.” She added, “This is about where the alt-left seems to be taking us.” And it’s not just people looking in from the outside who are sick of the left-wing mob:

Among those who remain, many resent how the administration catered to the most radical students. “I feel like the rest of us are getting dragged through the mud for what’s essentially a Marxist outburst,” said James Stewart, who will graduate from Evergreen this spring.

Last fall, Mr. Stewart conducted an in-depth survey of some 50 students for his statistics class. Almost all called themselves progressive, but Mr. Stewart found “enormous internal backlash, especially from those who are approaching graduation or have a finger on the pulse of what’s happening outside of Evergreen.” More than one-third of the students said “academic mobbing” was a top concern, Mr. Stewart said. “They now feel like they can’t speak their mind without getting attacked.”

Stewart is right about this being a Marxist outburst. The problem is that the school’s president gave the Marxists complete control of the campus rather than restoring order and demanding adults act their age. The results of that decision became evident last year when enrollment dropped 5%, prompting a hiring freeze. If enrollment drops another 10% or even 20% this fall, resulting in dozens of layoffs, it will be difficult to blame this on something other than President Bridges poor handling of the crisis.

At what point do alumni and parents of current students look at this decline and decide it’s going to take a new captain to right the ship? If there’s any justice, President Bridges will be one of the people out of a job in the next academic year.

The post More scenes from the decline of Evergreen State College appeared first on Hot Air.

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