Bill Clinton Apologizes Again After NBC Interview

Former President Bill Clinton was condemned by critics of all political stripes Monday after he refused to acknowledge he owed Monica Lewinsky an apology for the biggest scandal of the 90s.

Monica Lewinsky

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Samantha Bee may have apologized but Kathy Griffin, Sally Field, other Hollywood liberals standing by her

Sam’s point was true: Ivanka has not helped immigrant kids. Roseanne’s was a flat out lie.” Actress Alyssa Milano noted that Barr previously used the same word to refer to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. She later retweeted a previously …

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Bill Clinton Rape Accuser Juanita Broaddrick Skewers NBC over Clinton Interview

When former President Bill Clinton played the victim during an NBC interview that aired Monday, there was one member of the audience who wasn’t buying it at all. Because Juanita Broadrick has spent almost 20 years telling the world that Clinton had brutally raped her in an Arkansas hotel room in 1978. And she wants…

The post Bill Clinton Rape Accuser Juanita Broaddrick Skewers NBC over Clinton Interview appeared first on Conservative Tribune.

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Bill Clinton tries to clarify controversial comments on Monica Lewinsky – and makes it worse

After former President Bill Clinton angrily responded to questioning about his former mistress Monica Lewinsky Monday, the public outcry led him to attempt to clarify his comments at a later event.

Here’s what he said

Clinton was promoting his new book at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Monday evening when he addressed the furor over his earlier comments.

“The truth is, the hubbub was I got hot under the collar,” Clinton explained. “Because of the way the questions were asked, and I think what was lost are the two points that I made, that are important to me.”

“The suggestion was that I never apologized for what caused all the trouble for me twenty years ago,” he continued. “So first point is, I did.”

“I live with it all the time”

“I meant it then, and I meant it now,” he said. “I apologized to my family, to Monica Lewinsky and her family, and to the American people. Before a panel of ministers in the White House, which was widely reported, so I was, I did that. I meant it then, and I mean it today. I live with it all the time.”

“The second is, that I support the ‘Me Too’ movement, and I think it’s long overdue,” he added. “And I have always tried to support it in the decisions and policies that I have advanced.”

Watch the CNN video report on Clinton’s second comment:

Keith Boykin, former White House aide to Clinton, said on CNN that the former president needed to apologize to Monica Lewinsky, and he listed off the three times he hurt democratic presidential candidates.

“I’ve tried to do a good job since then”

In the earlier interview, Clinton protested that he didn’t owe Monica Lewinsky an apology, leading many to condemn the former president. As noted by CNN Erin Burnett, Clinton doubled down in his clarification by saying that he had already apologized publicly.

“I dealt with it 20 years ago. And the American people, two-thirds of them, stayed with me,” Clinton said. “And I’ve tried to do a good job since then with my life and with my work. That’s all I have to say to you.”

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Reigniting The Meaning Of Citizenship Through National Service

It’s been a long time since a common rite of passage among our nation’s men was to put on a uniform and defend your nation, community, and family. Yet at a time of increasing hyperpolarization in our country, as well as the deteriorating state of our nation’s youth in mind, body, and soul, national military service may be an idea worth considering once again.

National service has been ever-present in our country’s history. From militias in the Revolutionary War era to the wartime drafts in the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, to peacetime drafts through various parts of our nation’s past.

The legacy from those eras of conscription still remain in the form of the Selective Service system, which many of us remember being notified that we needed to register for upon reaching age 18.

The Selective Service system also has been the subject of debate in recent years, as many persons have considered whether women should register for it as well – such as during the 2016 Presidential election when Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton called for such.

Among other republics and democracies in the world national service is relatively common, from the nations of Europe to Africa, from the Middle East to Asia to South America. Conscription began falling out of favor since the end of the Cold War, as the general state of worry over military conflict faded.

Yet in recent years conscription has made a comeback. French President Macron has been trying to reintroduce military conscription in order to “foster patriotism and heal social divisions.” Norway recently expanded its military conscription in 2016 to include women, as Sweden has now re-introduced conscription as well.

Perhaps the most noted military conscription program is that of Israel, which requires all men and women to serve about two years in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF), with few exceptions. While brought about by military necessity, it has also cultivated an Israeli citizenry that has the character, grit, and sense of duty to keep their nation thriving.

It used to be that way in America, as serving in the military was a relatively common experience. In 1980, veterans totaled 18% of adults in the United States. In contrast, by 2016 that number had fallen to 7%.

At a time when our nation is reeling from divisions along seemingly every line possible, it is worth considering a common and shared experience as national service to reconnect our country together. The benefits are very clear in other nations, as despite often no overt military conflict conscription still provides a variety of security and social benefits to the country.

Undoubtedly the implementation of a conscription program, not seen in our nation for almost half a century, would be difficult initially. Not only have the times and culture changed, but so has the very nature of our armed forces.

Our military nowadays is an extremely high-tech organization and finding how to best utilize the massive manpower from our almost 330 million person nation would require careful delineation.

Furthermore, many of our nation’s youth, estimated currently at 71% of those between the ages of 17 and 24, are grossly unfit for military service. Creating a new conscript category and integrating them usefully into the nation’s military would be challenging, but given how seemingly every other nation is able to do it effectively we undoubtedly can find a way to as well.

The idea of national service would undoubtedly require a significant period of pilot programs and testing. The idea has been proposed frequently in the national discourse throughout the years and particularly during the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. It is a big, nation-changing policy that certainly, if it gets further traction and consideration, would be a serious national debate.

National service is a very realistic program that could do a lot in solving many of our nation’s otherwise seemingly unsolvable problems, as well as reigniting reflection on the meaning of citizenry in a republic.

I think it is worth considering at our present time, as, although it seems a big change, nonetheless could revive our American spirit and heal our nation in an extraordinary way.

 

The post Reigniting The Meaning Of Citizenship Through National Service appeared first on The American Spectator.

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Huge challenges for Democrats in California as they eye control of the House in midterms

The state’s primaries feature an unconventional primary system that could lead to a host of unintended results for Democrats

California is ground zero for Democratic efforts to regain the House in 2018 but the state’s unusual primary system may derail Nancy Pelosi’s hopes of becoming Speaker again.

There are seven Republican held districts in the state that Hillary Clinton won in the 2016 presidential election. However, it’s possible that several of them will not have a Democrat in the ballot in November.

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