Scott Rasmussen: Republicans poised to gain Senate seats in 2018

Last December, Democrat Doug Jones won a Senate race in Alabama by defeating a horribly flawed Republican candidate Roy Moore. For the first time, it appeared that the Democrats had a plausible path to winning control of the U.S. Senate in 2018.

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Once Again Certain Americans Need To Learn From History

It looks like we are in for a long hot summer in America.  I am one who does not like extremely hot humid weather.  It is even more painful when the prospects of ignorant, indoctrinated Soros paid gumps may seek to riot in American streets this summer.  The reason for such plans are always the same tired excuses given by bitter useful idiots who don’t know anything and got that mixed up when it comes to justice, freedom, liberty and reparations.  To this day, many black Americans who stupidly call themselves African Americans do not even understand how reparations are designed to be carried out.

Just recently in Seattle, white patrons at a certain bar were required to pay for the drinks of black female patrons.  The reason given “it was a form of reparations for slavery.”  That makes about as much sense as white shoppers being forced to buy groceries for black grocery store patrons as a form of reparations.  It is stupid and victimizes people who had nothing to do with slavery and gives a false sense of gotcha to those receiving reparation drinks or whatever.

Black Americans would be better served by the example of other people groups who have dealt with cruel and unfair treatment.  After the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor during World War Two, it was not long before Japanese residents in the United States suffered a major ordeal.  They were rounded up and systematically tossed into concentration camps.  The reason given is were at war and the Japanese might carry out war activities within the continental United States.  After all, it was the Japanese who fooled America into thinking they wanted to be our friend by signing a peace agreement with our republic.  They had even given beautiful Flowering trees to cities like Washington D.C. and Cleveland which annually bloom every spring.

The Japanese residents in America suffered in concentration camps and had faced racist treatment prior to the Peal Harbor attacks.  But they took it in stride and like the Chinese who also immigrated to the United States received shabby treatment.  But rather steep themselves of a caldron of bitterness, the Japanese and Chinese immigrants patiently learned how to succeed economically.  They supported businesses in their respective communities and gradually became highly successful, despite whatever white Americans thought of them at the time.

In addition, although the Japanese could have been very bitter, but to the immeasurable embarrassment and chagrin of those who tossed Japanese into concentration camps, they enthusiastically mobilized their sons and sent them into the American armed forces to volunteer their services.  The Japanese regiments were among the more highly decorated in World War II.  Although they went into the military ranks under suspicion and resentment, they came out as heralded heroes.

But of all the ethnic groups in America it seems that Black Americans have had the most difficulty securing their place as assimilated.  Many early political leaders including Abraham Lincoln expressed concerned over the ability of Blacks to adjust because of the slavery culture in which the first few generations were raised.   Despite apprehensions, freedom and education brought tremendous hope and optimism to Black Americans within three generations.  After three generations, many blacks were overcoming the culture gap.  In time Blacks in every other nation on earth saw their ethnic counterparts in America experiencing a higher standard of living than Blacks in any other part of the world. In fact, by 1970 a black high school student in Alabama or Mississippi had a higher chance at obtaining a collegiate education than a white student in Great Britain.

Great Americans like Frederick Douglas, Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver all believed that hard work, an education and faith in God would ensure a pathway to success and blaze a trail for following generations to follow.  Still others like W. E.B. Dubois and white democrats fought to instill a level of bitterness and hatred for America in Blacks and conned them into expecting government gratuities as a main source of revenue.  Experience has proven that such a mindset has corrupted and debilitated Black Americans socially, economically and most horribly in family life where females now run over 70 percent of all Black American households.

Many tend to uphold the Black female as morally superior to the Black man. Yet they fail to answer the question that if Black females are morally superior, why is it they continue to raise the most damaged generations of Black boys in the history of the republic?  After all it is they who have complete access to their boys without any input from men, because of their aversion to Black male authority.  Remember, they preferred government handouts over a working Black father in the home.  Until the 1970s, the majority of Black American households were headed by Black American men who either had one or two jobs.

In the mid-sixties there were groups of Marxist agitators who promoted violence an attitude of entitlement among Black Americans.  One of the most famous was Eldridge Cleaver, who had been trained in Marxist philosophy and evil tactics while serving a fifteen year sentence in a California prison.  In 1967 he became Minister of Information for the Black Panthers.  Their goal was to use violence to wipe out the economic and social structure of the United States and roll out communism so that everyone would be equal, but equally poor.  Just like today’s Black Lives Matter movement, it wasn’t about working to improve the quality of life for anyone.  But to destroy the prospects of a good life for everyone, except the elites at the top of course.

After leading a wave of violence in 1968, Eldridge Cleaver and his wife fled the United State and hid out in Cuba for eight years.  A funny thing happened.  While in Cuba he witnessed the horrendous failure of communism as a means to improve life for the common man.  Mr. Cleaver concluded that it would be better to come back to America and pay for his crimes in prison than to remain free and morbidly disappointed in Cuba.  Black Americans today would be much better off if they researched the Eldridge Cleaver story for themselves and came to the logical conclusion that while it may not be perfect in America,  it is the best hope for mankind after God almighty.  Here’s hoping and praying, that they awaken from their democrat party influenced nightmare and seek to live rather than just exist as Soros, Alynski inspired cretins.  I know it might seem impossible, but miracles do happen.

Enjoy the miracle of Blowin’ away the Myths and Revealing the Truth via #TheEdwardsNotebook commentary every day on #freedominamericaradio, #goodtalkradio #talkamericaradio #shrmedia during #MoneyTalkwithMelanie at 5:10 PM EST, on KCKQ AM 1180 Reno, Nevada during AM News, just after 4:30 AM during the Captain’s America Third Watch show emanating nationwide from flagship station AM 860 WGUL the Answer Tampa Florida.  The Edwards Notebook is also heard regularly on FM 101.5 and AM 1400 the Patriot, Detroit.  Last but definitely not least, #TheRonEdwardsExperience talk show is heating up the airwaves to a growing audience Fridays at 4:00 PM EST, 1:00 PM PT on KCKQ AM 1180 Reno Nevada, #shrmedia and americamatters.us and at 7:00 PM PT Thursdays on #goodtalkradio.

© 2018 Ron Edwards – All Rights Reserved

E-Mail Ron Edwards: [email protected]

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Alberto brings wind, rain as Gulf Coast prepares

Florida, Alabama and Mississippi launched emergency preparations ahead of the arrival of Subtropical Storm Alberto, a slow-moving system expected to cause wet misery across the eastern U.S. Gulf Coast over the holiday weekend. Travis Lee loads filled sand bags onto a truck bed as he and a co-worker prepare to protect the storage company they work at, Saturday, May 26, 2018 in Gulfport, Miss.

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How might NFL discipline 49ers Reuben Foster?

San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster, right, and his attorney Joshua Bentley, left, walk to the Santa Clara Hall of Justice for Foster’s preliminary hearing on his domestic-violence case in San Jose, California, on Thursday, May 17, 2018. SANTA CLARA – Reuben Foster had his marijuana-possession case dismissed Friday in Alabama, two days after the 49ers linebacker had domestic-violence charges dropped in a different case in Santa Clara County.

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PBS Lets Vets Themselves Describe Life Inside the War Machine

'Going to War'Going to War. PBS. Monday, May 28, 9 p.m.

Served Like a Girl. PBS. Monday, May 28, 10 p.m.

So, an easy solution to the problem of Adderall abuse: It’s called “Afghanistan.”

“I think it’s hilarious that in America now, we have this big thing about medications and being present and all this other kind of stuff,” says a military veteran in PBS’ Going to War. “Because you’re never more present than you are in wars. Soldiers have figured this out eons ago. You have to be present to get shot at. I guarantee you are locked in.”

Going to War, produced by veteran documentarian Michael Epstein (LennoNYC) and spearheaded by commentary from war correspondent Sebastian Junger (Restrepo) and Vietnam veteran and author Karl Marlantes (What It Is Like to Go to War), is a collection of interviews with vets of U.S. wars over the past 60 years, plumbing their feelings about what to many was the most significant experience of their lives.

PBS has packaged it on Memorial Day with the peculiar but ultimately endearing tale of women back from the front, Served Like a Girl, the first directorial effort by filmmaker Lysa Heslov, airing as an episode of the Independent Lens series.

The relationship between soldiers and war is never as simple as outsiders make it out to be. Some certainly hate it. But others find a human resonance in war that otherwise eludes them: A sense of purpose, of brotherhood and even, paradoxically, of security. One vet interviewed in Going to War recalls that he felt safer in Vietnam, where “you know somebody’s got your back. In the world, it’s dog eat dog.”

That is, arguably, not a typical human response. But one of the most interesting things about the documentary is the frank admission of the soldiers—both male and female—is that they aren’t typically human, or at least weren’t when they were in the military. Going to war would be impossible, they say, if the military didn’t strip them of ordinary human sensibilities and rebuild them as a hive mind.

The whole point of basic training is aimed at obliterating any sense of individuality. “The ego, it has to go,” says one vet. When that’s accomplished, drill instructors begin levying collective punishments: If one soldier’s bunk isn’t made right, his whole unit has to do punishment marches. By the end, the vets say note approvingly, all notions of personal survivability have been erased. “The moment you have self-preserving thoughts,” says one, “everything’s going to hell.”

The near universality of the experience emerges in a segment of Going to War in which vets from different units, wars and decades are all asked the same questions and their answers edited together in a stream-of-conciousness rap. First thought upon entering a war zone: “What the hell am I doing?” Second: “What’s wrong with those guys I’m replacing?” says one. “Zoned-out zombies, a mean hard look on their face.” The third, at the sound of the first bullets: “My God, we’re being shot at.”

Within the common framework, of course, the soldiers have individual stories. One of the most chilling comes from Al Grantham, who quit his bricklaying job in Alabama to join the Marines and fight in Vietnam. Knocked senseless by a North Vietnamese bullet during the battle of Hue, he was loaded onto a stack of casualties on the back of a tank and hauled outside the city. It wasn’t until he heard a medic shout, “Hey, this one’s not dead yet”—Grantham’s first thought was, “that poor sumbitch must be hurt bad”—that he realized the rest of the passengers on the tank were corpses and the poor sumbitch was him.

Yet the thinness and easy erasability of the line between life and death were not, for many of the vets, the most frightening discovery. It was the realization that they were, in some fundamental way, broken. “You’re tired of being tired, you’re scared of being scared,” remembers one.

And a former Marine describes with agonizing calm a day in Iraq when six car-bombs exploded in 15 minutes around his unit’s urban position. When the explosions finally stopped, all that could be heard were the shrills of Iraqi women cradling their dead. The Marine officer, trying to count his men and plot his next move, could barely hear himself think. “Maybe, he wondered idly, “I could kill them to shut them up.” His next shocked thought: “What am I capable of? … My God-given conscience is not going to stop me from doing these things.”

Served Like a Girl, in the early going, seems almost whimsical by comparison. It follows the contestants in the Ms. Veteran America beauty pageant, which raises money to support homeless vets.

They seem, mostly, an ordinary collection of female twentysomethings with only the occasional crackpot loose end—notably the contestant whose mother’s nipple was pecked off by a chicken. (“He had my nipple and I had his butt,” she declares without rancor.) Backstage at the pageant, much of their conversation consists of which self-administered sex toys best stand up to the rigors of desert warfare.

But as the film continues, the scars left by their combat tours start to be revealed: Broken marriages and child-custody fights. Macabre nightmares. Crippling guilt that they walked away from an IED explosion and their companions didn’t. Not all the scars are emotional. It’s not until about a third of the way through Served Like a Girl that you realized that one principal character is missing her legs. The Miss America pageant will never look quite the same to me again.

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