IDENTILOCK Chosen as Grand Prize in Project ChildSafe’s 4th Annual Campaign

With the support of the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), Project ChildSafe® spreads the word on safe storage and responsible firearms ownership through Friends and Family four-week campaign, complete with prizes!

Project ChildSafe Friends and Family Campaign
Project ChildSafe Friends and Family Campaign

Detroit, Mich. (Ammoland.com) – IDENTILOCK®, the world’s first biometric fingerprint trigger lock for firearms, is proud to announce their support of the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s program, Project ChildSafe®, through the annual Friends and Family campaign. An IDENTILOCK has been chosen as the grand prize for the final week, June 4 – 8, 2018, of entries.

Project ChildSafe was developed by the NSSF to promote firearm safety through the distribution of safety education messages and free firearm Safety Kits. The kits included a cable-style gun locking device and a brochure (also available in Spanish) that discusses safe handling and secure storage guidelines to help deter access by unauthorized individuals. Since 1999, more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies have partnered with the program to distribute more than 37 million firearms safety kits to gun owners in all 50 states and five US territories. Project ChildSafe has helped raise awareness about the safe and responsible ownership of firearms and the importance of storing firearms securely when not in use to help prevent accidents, theft and misuses.

IDENTILOCK keeps personal defense pistols safe and secure from unauthorized users.

“It is IDENTILOCK’S mission to keep unintentional usage of a firearm from happening yet allow the lawful owner to have quick and easy access to his/her method of self defense in a time of emergency,” Omer Kiyani, founder and creator of the IDENTILOCK system, explained. “It is an honor to work with Project ChildSafe in their efforts to spread gun safety and responsibility messaging to all firearms owners in the United States.”

The IDENTILOCK biometric fingerprint firearm trigger lock was designed to allow firearm owners to keep a self or home defense handgun accessible in a nightstand, desk, purse, car or pack while at the same time keeping it safe and secure from any unauthorized users.

Quick to deploy, the system uses a 360-degree fingerprint reader (and up to three users) to disengage the locking system from the trigger lock, instantaneously. The IDENTILOCK system is ruggedly built to withstand years of abuse and environmental conditions. Available in several models to accommodate the most popular handguns.

For more on IDENTILOCK and to sign up for their email newsletter featuring exclusive news and offers, visit here. Available online and at Amazon, Brownell’s Zanders and Optics Planet. Stay in the conversation on Facebook and YouTube.


About IDENTILOCK:

Founded by Omer Kiyani, a 2nd Amendment advocate, gunshot victim survivor and former automobile industry safety systems engineer, IDENTILOCK® develops the world’s most innovative gun safety products. The IDENTILOCK® firearm trigger lock is the first product utilizing state-of-the-art biometric technology to enhance user safety and security while prohibiting non-recognized users from accessing the firearm.

About Project ChildSafe®:

The Project ChildSafe® Foundation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt nonprofit charitable organization. All donations to the organization are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. Donations can be made online, by phone 203-426-1320 x. 232 or by mail to the Project ChildSafe Foundation Attn: Development Department, 11 Mile Hill Rd., Newtown, CT 06470.

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Amphibious Vehicles Are the Military’s Latest Tax Dollar Sinkhole

One of the worst symptoms of the paralysis in Washington and at the Pentagon has been the inability to correctly match weapon systems with current enemy threat capabilities. Hence the United States Marine Corps is set to announce the final winner between defense contractors BAE Systems and SAIC to build and field their new Amphibious Combat Vehicle, or ACV.

Or should we say the old Amphibious Combat Vehicle? Because after 46 years and tens of billions of dollars, the Marines are right back where they started with this technology, which leaves no one—except maybe the contractors feeding off this farcical routine—feeling very satisfied.

So how did we get here?

The naval campaigns in the Pacific theater of World War II were successful due to the capability of the Marine Corps to conduct amphibious assaults against Japanese-held islands. Following the war this capability was written into law via the National Security Act of 1947, which stipulated that the Marine Corps was responsible for the seizure of advanced naval bases.

In order to move from Navy ships to enemy-held territory, the Marines must be transported across a distance of water and rely on what is generally called a connector. Both the Navy and Marine Corps operate various connectors from ship to shore, while the job of the Marines is to fight their way into enemy territory. Marine connectors only carry one weapon: Marines. Step one is to take the beach.

During World War II, the Navy ships could move to within a few miles of the Japanese-held islands before loading Marines into connectors. But with the advent of ballistic missile technology during the Cold War, a new weapon made its debut: the anti-ship missile.

The idea is simple. If Navy ships are within range of an anti-ship missile, they risk being severely damaged or even sunk. The solution is standoff. The Navy ships must stay outside the effective range of the missiles or use defensive measures to shoot the missiles down. This forces the ships further out to sea and increases the distance the connectors must travel over the open ocean to transport the Marines.

The connector vehicle the Marines adopted in 1972 was the Amphibious Assault Vehicle or AAV. AAVs are stored in hollow lower sections of naval ships known as well decks, which can be flooded so the AAV can exit the aft end of the ship into the ocean. The vehicle moves through the water using two traditional water propellers and also has tracks similar to a tank in order to drive on land. The AAV can carry around 20 Marines, swim through the water at seven knots (nautical miles per hour; seven knots is eight mph for comparison), and has an advertised water range of approximately 20 nautical miles, which in reality is closer to five nautical miles.

But anti-ship missile technology advanced in the 1980s, and proved deadly in the 1982 Falklands War between Great Britain and Argentina as the British lost two ships* to French-built Exocet missiles. So the Marine Corps and Navy rewrote their doctrine to move their ships over the horizon to approximately 12 nautical miles.

This strategy necessitated a new connector vehicle. Marine amphibious doctrine requires a “swift introduction of sufficient combat power ashore.” If the AAV can only swim at seven knots and the ships are 12 nautical miles away, you are looking at close to a two-hour ride to the beach. Time equals distance divided by speed. For the Marines stacked like sardines in full combat gear in the sweltering troop compartment of the AAV, this bumpy two hours becomes a rather nauseating and incapacitating experience.

So work began in earnest on the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, or EFV, in the 1980s. It was designed with a powerful jet propulsion system that allowed it to plane above the water like a speedboat and achieve 25 knots, three times as fast as the AAV with a water range of approximately 65 nautical miles. Over the course of 20 years, more than $3 billion was invested in the program. Operational EFVs were due to be in service by 2015, completely replacing the aging AAVs.

But potential adversaries didn’t stagnate. They developed a defensive Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) strategy. Waters around potential landing sites would be mined, and the range, speed, and lethality of anti-ship missiles enhanced significantly.

The increasing complexity of the operating environment did not go unnoticed. During the Obama administration’s first term, Undersecretary of the Navy Robert O. Work envisioned an either/or type of scenario for the future of amphibious conflict. Either Marines would land essentially unopposed as in Grenada in 1983 or the A2/AD posture of our enemies would be so preventative as to require a massive bombardment using long-range stand-off weapons like Tomahawk missiles and bombers to clear out anti-ship missiles and other defenses. Neither situation necessitated the use of a high-speed, heavily armored connector like the EFV.

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates canceled the EFV program in 2011. Immediately afterwards, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Amos, decided to pursue the next iteration of troop connector named the Amphibious Combat Vehicle, or ACV. High speed on water remained a top priority as late as 2013.

After some research proposals were explored, General Amos decided in January 2014 that the ACV would be developed in a phased approach with a decreased need for speed on water. The ACV 1.1 was to be an off-the-shelf, armored, wheeled vehicle that met requirements for armor protection on land but would rely on connectors like the Navy’s Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC, aka Hovercraft) to move it swiftly from over the horizon at 40 knots to a few miles from its objectives, where it would then swim the last few miles. The LCAC has a large deck area that can accommodate several ACVs. Traditionally the LCAC would bring in heavy equipment like tanks or trucks after Marines secured a beach since the LCAC lacks armor protection.

The phased acquisitions approach was a tacit admission that you can’t have your cake and eat it too. The Marine Corps asked industry for a vehicle that offered protection first and then speed on the water at some point in the future.

The ACV 1.1 would not be able to self-deploy and swim from a ship like the AAV or EFV. The Marine Corps would buy a smaller number of the ACV 1.1, upgrade older AAVs and keep them in service until 2030, and research and develop ACV 1.2, a high-speed, fully amphibious vehicle.

But this solution appears to have been smoke and mirrors. In March 2015, Marine Commandant Joseph Dunford testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee concerning the program. He said industry might merge the ACV 1.1 and ACV 1.2 requirements together.

BAE Systems and SAIC were awarded $100 million each in December of 2015 to develop 16 test vehicles for ACV 1.1. And lo and behold, abracadabra, both company’s test vehicles could self-deploy and swim from a ship at, wait for it, seven knots—as fast as, you guessed it, the 1972 version.

Since the introduction of the AAV, almost 50 years have passed and many billions have been spent in research and development. And now the taxpayer will be footing the bill for a connector that holds fewer Marines than in 1972 (13 versus 20), swims at the same speed, and is more expensive.

The Marine Corps and industry are touting the fact that the ACV is under cost and ahead of schedule. The program is projected to cost $1.2 billion with 204 vehicles operational by 2020.

In October 2017, deputy Marine commandant Lieutenant General Beaudreault stated that “we have to find a solution to getting Marines to shore, from over the horizon, at something greater than seven knots. We’ve got to have high-speed connectors.”

It appears the deputy commandant didn’t get the memo. As the F-35 and USS Gerald Ford programs have shown, whenever the system wins, the warfighter and taxpayer lose.

*Story has been changed to reflect the British loss of one destroyer and one container ship during the Falklands War in 1982.

Jeff Groom is a former Marine officer. He is the author of American Cobra Pilot: A Marine Remembers a Dog and Pony Show (2018).

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Southern Police Equipment Announce Virginia State Contract Award

The Richmond-based law enforcement and correctional equipment supplier has landed a five-year, six category contract from the Virginia Department of General Services to fulfill all apparel, footwear and accessory needs to all Virginia state law enforcement, correctional, institutional and state agencies facilities and employees.

Virginia Police

Richmond, Va. (Ammoland.com) Southern Police Equipment announces that it has won a large five year, six category award for all state of Virginia agencies, including law enforcement, institutions and correction facilities from the Virginia Department of General Services. The contract covers procurement of footwear, clothing and accessories for the state of Virginia facilities and employees, such as the Division of Motor Vehicles, Virginia state hospitals and school systems, the Virginia Port Authority and Airports and colleges, such as Virginia Tech, Virginia Military Institute (VMI) and the National Guard installation at Fort Pickett.

Brands distributed by Southern Police Equipment that will be part of the procurement include Bates Footwear, Wolverine, G&G, Danner Boots, Caterpillar, Tru Spec, 5.11, Aramark, Dickies, Jerzee, Fruit of the Loom and many others. Southern Police Equipment has also announced the US Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP) has extended their contract with the Virginia-based distributor for a fourth year for a variety of anti-stab body armor through their manufacturing partner, Survival Armor. Southern Police Equipment includes in this contract body armor developed exclusively for women by Roxanne Folsom, a pioneer in the development and fitting of ballistic protection to accommodate the female shape for over twenty years.

Southern Police Equipment, located in Richmond, Virginia, is a small, woman owned and operated business under the leadership of Karen Allan Ballengee. Ballengee was also one of the first members of the National Association of Police Equipment Distributors in 1982, having served on their board of directors as president and still continues to value the relationship the non-profit association provides for her growing distributorship.

“We are extremely honored to continue to serve the state of Virginia with this new contract,” Karen Allan Ballengee commented. “We continue to grow the number of brands we offer to law enforcement, state and federal agencies and our correctional and institutional facilities. Southern Police Equipment is also growing and we are currently hiring for several positions at our Richmond headquarters.”

For more information on Southern Police Equipment, visit www.southernpoliceequipment.com. Southern Police Equipment is a member of NAPED.


About Southern Police Equipment:

Southern is celebrating our 47th year in business! Southern Police Equipment is a family – operated business established in 1971. Owned and operated by Karen Allan Ballengee, whose goal has always been to offer the best quality products and sales representatives available.

Southern Police Equipment carries a large assortment of equipment and supplies for the public safety professional or the general shooter: body armor, tactical equipment, chemical products, cleaning supplies, gun cases, range equipment, vehicle equipment, emergency equipment, law enforcement equipment, duty gear, knives and tools, used and new guns and much more. GSA Contract Number GS-07F-0273T. www.southernpoliceequipment.com

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Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission Approves Air Powered Weapons

Tennessee Approves The Benjamin Pioneer Airbow For Hunting
Tennessee Approves The Benjamin Pioneer Airbow For Hunting

Bloomfield, NY-(Ammoland.com)- The Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission has announced that starting with the 2018 hunting season, big bore PCP air guns .35 caliber or larger such as the .357 Caliber Benjamin Bulldog will be legal to hunt Deer, Elk, and Bear during the Tennessee Modern Gun Season. The Benjamin Pioneer Airbow will be legal means to harvest Deer, Elk, Bear and Turkey during the Modern Gun Season for all hunters and during the archery season for disabled hunters.

“The action of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission to allow the use of big bore airguns for the take of big game is an incredible testament the maturation that is happening across the county,” said Jay Duncan Director of Marketing for Crosman Corporation. “Not only is airgun technology maturing to the point that it provides hunters a new, exciting and ethical means of take, but regulatory officials are open to broadening opportunities to put new hunters in the field.”

Tennessee joins a growing list of states allowing for the use of big bore airguns and/or the Airbow during their hunting seasons. Florida, Texas, Arizona, Virginia, Missouri, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland, and Washington State allow big game animals to be legally taken with the Airbow. Feral hogs can be taken in Georgia, Florida and Texas while coyotes and other predators may be hunted with the Airbow in over 30 states. Georgia and South Carolina allow the Airbow to be used for alligator hunting.

The Pioneer Airbow is an all-new category of big game weapon featuring full length arrows and full weight broadheads, all driven by air. Based on Benjamin’s proven American-made PCP platform, the Pioneer can be cocked with two fingers (and decocked just as easily), and fires 8 shots in the same amount of time it takes to fire three from a crossbow, all at a blazing 450 FPS. You can view this game-changer by viewing this video of Jim Shockey taking down a American Bison.

The Benjamin Bulldog is a .357 caliber 3000 psi PCP airgun that delivers 10 shots at 200 foot pounds of energy. The lightweight, well-balanced bullpup design features a rifled and shrouded barrel for a quiet shot, and 26 inches of picatinny rail, more than enough to accommodate a scope and any other accessories the hunter requires. See the power of hunting with the Bulldog in the Management Advantage’s latest video.

Crosman, the largest American manufacturer of airguns, continues to work with the Airgun Sporting Association to lead efforts to educate legislators and regulators about the efficacy of airguns and the airbow for the ethical take of big game.

“The Airgun Sporting Association is committed to working with our state wildlife agency partners across the country to expand the use of airguns for hunting,” said J. Mitch King President and CEO of Airgun Sporting Association. “This action by the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission to legalize the use of big bore airguns (35 caliber and larger) for big game hunting in Tennessee will provide Tennessee hunters with a new and exciting opportunity for hunting in their state. The Association and the airgun industry applauds the Commission for their action and we look forward to supporting our state wildlife agency partners in their efforts toward wildlife management and the growth of hunting and recreational shooting.”


About CrosmanCrosman Corporation

Since its founding in 1923, Crosman has been driven by the steadfast pursuit of quality and innovation. Crosman’s history is rooted in the airgun industry, where today Crosman remains the market leader in airguns, airgun ammunition, and consumables. In addition to airguns, Crosman has a diversified product lineup in the outdoor sporting goods industry that includes airsoft, firearms optics and laser aiming devices under the Lasermax brand, and archery products under the CenterPoint brand. Crosman is a subsidiary of Compass Diversified Holdings Inc. (NYSE: CODI). For more information visit www.crosman.com

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