Rocket League is getting a Jurassic-Park-inspired car pack

The Jurassic World Car Pack, as the new licensed addition is known, contains the distinctive Jeep Wrangler from the movie series, with its own unique wheels and engine audio. When used on the blue team, it’ll sport liveries from Jurassic World, while the orange team proudly displays the iconic livery from the original Jurassic Park trilogy.

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Once Again Certain Americans Need To Learn From History

It looks like we are in for a long hot summer in America.  I am one who does not like extremely hot humid weather.  It is even more painful when the prospects of ignorant, indoctrinated Soros paid gumps may seek to riot in American streets this summer.  The reason for such plans are always the same tired excuses given by bitter useful idiots who don’t know anything and got that mixed up when it comes to justice, freedom, liberty and reparations.  To this day, many black Americans who stupidly call themselves African Americans do not even understand how reparations are designed to be carried out.

Just recently in Seattle, white patrons at a certain bar were required to pay for the drinks of black female patrons.  The reason given “it was a form of reparations for slavery.”  That makes about as much sense as white shoppers being forced to buy groceries for black grocery store patrons as a form of reparations.  It is stupid and victimizes people who had nothing to do with slavery and gives a false sense of gotcha to those receiving reparation drinks or whatever.

Black Americans would be better served by the example of other people groups who have dealt with cruel and unfair treatment.  After the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor during World War Two, it was not long before Japanese residents in the United States suffered a major ordeal.  They were rounded up and systematically tossed into concentration camps.  The reason given is were at war and the Japanese might carry out war activities within the continental United States.  After all, it was the Japanese who fooled America into thinking they wanted to be our friend by signing a peace agreement with our republic.  They had even given beautiful Flowering trees to cities like Washington D.C. and Cleveland which annually bloom every spring.

The Japanese residents in America suffered in concentration camps and had faced racist treatment prior to the Peal Harbor attacks.  But they took it in stride and like the Chinese who also immigrated to the United States received shabby treatment.  But rather steep themselves of a caldron of bitterness, the Japanese and Chinese immigrants patiently learned how to succeed economically.  They supported businesses in their respective communities and gradually became highly successful, despite whatever white Americans thought of them at the time.

In addition, although the Japanese could have been very bitter, but to the immeasurable embarrassment and chagrin of those who tossed Japanese into concentration camps, they enthusiastically mobilized their sons and sent them into the American armed forces to volunteer their services.  The Japanese regiments were among the more highly decorated in World War II.  Although they went into the military ranks under suspicion and resentment, they came out as heralded heroes.

But of all the ethnic groups in America it seems that Black Americans have had the most difficulty securing their place as assimilated.  Many early political leaders including Abraham Lincoln expressed concerned over the ability of Blacks to adjust because of the slavery culture in which the first few generations were raised.   Despite apprehensions, freedom and education brought tremendous hope and optimism to Black Americans within three generations.  After three generations, many blacks were overcoming the culture gap.  In time Blacks in every other nation on earth saw their ethnic counterparts in America experiencing a higher standard of living than Blacks in any other part of the world. In fact, by 1970 a black high school student in Alabama or Mississippi had a higher chance at obtaining a collegiate education than a white student in Great Britain.

Great Americans like Frederick Douglas, Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver all believed that hard work, an education and faith in God would ensure a pathway to success and blaze a trail for following generations to follow.  Still others like W. E.B. Dubois and white democrats fought to instill a level of bitterness and hatred for America in Blacks and conned them into expecting government gratuities as a main source of revenue.  Experience has proven that such a mindset has corrupted and debilitated Black Americans socially, economically and most horribly in family life where females now run over 70 percent of all Black American households.

Many tend to uphold the Black female as morally superior to the Black man. Yet they fail to answer the question that if Black females are morally superior, why is it they continue to raise the most damaged generations of Black boys in the history of the republic?  After all it is they who have complete access to their boys without any input from men, because of their aversion to Black male authority.  Remember, they preferred government handouts over a working Black father in the home.  Until the 1970s, the majority of Black American households were headed by Black American men who either had one or two jobs.

In the mid-sixties there were groups of Marxist agitators who promoted violence an attitude of entitlement among Black Americans.  One of the most famous was Eldridge Cleaver, who had been trained in Marxist philosophy and evil tactics while serving a fifteen year sentence in a California prison.  In 1967 he became Minister of Information for the Black Panthers.  Their goal was to use violence to wipe out the economic and social structure of the United States and roll out communism so that everyone would be equal, but equally poor.  Just like today’s Black Lives Matter movement, it wasn’t about working to improve the quality of life for anyone.  But to destroy the prospects of a good life for everyone, except the elites at the top of course.

After leading a wave of violence in 1968, Eldridge Cleaver and his wife fled the United State and hid out in Cuba for eight years.  A funny thing happened.  While in Cuba he witnessed the horrendous failure of communism as a means to improve life for the common man.  Mr. Cleaver concluded that it would be better to come back to America and pay for his crimes in prison than to remain free and morbidly disappointed in Cuba.  Black Americans today would be much better off if they researched the Eldridge Cleaver story for themselves and came to the logical conclusion that while it may not be perfect in America,  it is the best hope for mankind after God almighty.  Here’s hoping and praying, that they awaken from their democrat party influenced nightmare and seek to live rather than just exist as Soros, Alynski inspired cretins.  I know it might seem impossible, but miracles do happen.

Enjoy the miracle of Blowin’ away the Myths and Revealing the Truth via #TheEdwardsNotebook commentary every day on #freedominamericaradio, #goodtalkradio #talkamericaradio #shrmedia during #MoneyTalkwithMelanie at 5:10 PM EST, on KCKQ AM 1180 Reno, Nevada during AM News, just after 4:30 AM during the Captain’s America Third Watch show emanating nationwide from flagship station AM 860 WGUL the Answer Tampa Florida.  The Edwards Notebook is also heard regularly on FM 101.5 and AM 1400 the Patriot, Detroit.  Last but definitely not least, #TheRonEdwardsExperience talk show is heating up the airwaves to a growing audience Fridays at 4:00 PM EST, 1:00 PM PT on KCKQ AM 1180 Reno Nevada, #shrmedia and americamatters.us and at 7:00 PM PT Thursdays on #goodtalkradio.

© 2018 Ron Edwards – All Rights Reserved

E-Mail Ron Edwards: [email protected]

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Sanchez: Homeland Security not thinking straight on racially inspired violence

Sanchez: Homeland Security not thinking straight on racially inspired violence Who comes to mind if you hear that the government wants to track “violent, terroristic acts that were driven by race-related extremist ideologies.” Check out this story on …

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Cynthia Nixon Dismisses Hillary Clinton’s Cuomo Endorsement For NY Gov As ‘Establishment’: We Aren’t Afraid

On Thursday night, actress-turned-gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon appeared on The Daily Show to talk about her Democratic primary campaign against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. When asked what inspired her to not just vote but “be voted for …

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Ed Brown Products Introduce the K1 Field Knife Designed by Jason Knight

Ed Brown Products Introduce the K1 Field Knife Designed by Jason Knight
Ed Brown Products Introduce the K1 Field Knife Designed by Jason Knight

PERRY, MO-(Ammoland.com)- Ed Brown Products, Inc, is proud to team up with the craftsmen at Winkler Knives USA and master bladesmith Jason Knight to introduce the Ed Brown K1 fixed blade knife.

Some may know Jason Knight from his time as a Judge on the History Channel’s Forged In Fire. What you may not know is that he began designing knives at a young age, inspired by Edgar Rice Boroughs novels. Jason’s designs are more than just edged weapons and tools, they are functional art. His designs are inspired by curves and angles found in nature, and by years of studying blade performance and ergonomics.

His unique designs and experience made Jason the perfect choice to design the first knife for Ed Brown. Fitting with their 50 year history of making custom 1911s, Jason took some of the design cues from standards like, the Snakeskin on the Kobra Carry and the skeletonized hammer on the 1911. The K1 field knife is lightweight and the perfect companion in the field or on the range.

Sales and Marketing Director John May said, “It just doesn’t get any better than this – having a Master Bladesmith like Jason design our first knife. It has been an honor to work with him, and we look forward to teamming up with him on more projects in the future.”

For more information on the K1 Knife, or any of the world’s finest custom 1911s, parts and accessories, check with your local Ed Brown Products Authorized Dealer or visit www.edbrown.com . Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. Find informational videos on our firearms by visiting our YouTube channel.


About Ed Brown Products: Ed Brown Products

Beginning over 50 years ago as a one-man custom shop, Ed Brown Products has evolved into one of the leading custom manufacturers of high-end 1911 handguns and components. The complete line of innovative 1911 parts, and 1911 handguns, represent the pinnacle of engineering, hand craftsmanship, and performance, and come with a lifetime warranty! All Ed Brown products are manufactured in a family-owned and operated facility under the direct supervision of the Brown family, who are entirely focused on raising the bar for custom 1911 excellence. For more information please contact Ed Brown Products at 573-565-3261, or visit www.edbrown.com.

The post Ed Brown Products Introduce the K1 Field Knife Designed by Jason Knight appeared first on AmmoLand.com.

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Public School Sex-Ed’s Descent Into Madness

On June 14, the school board of Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS), the tenth largest school division in the United States, will convene and likely approve a number of changes to its sex-ed program, including replacing the term “biological sex” with “sex assigned at birth,” teaching that children aren’t born male or female, minimizing the role of abstinence, and excising clergy from a list of “trusted adults.” Although I am a product of FCPS, as was my mother and a long list of aunts, uncles, and cousins on both sides of my family, my children will not be attending their local elementary school. The radical sexual pedagogy promoted by FCPS, coupled with its well-publicized laxity in confronting illegal sexual behavior by its staff, has convinced me that my eldest daughter, who will enter kindergarten this fall, would be safer in a private school.

The latest recommendation by the county’s Family Life Education Curriculum Advisory Committee builds upon other sex-ed trends in FCPS, where “oral sex” is introduced to kids as young as 12. Thirteen-year-olds, meanwhile, are told about “anal sex” 18 separate times in one year’s worth of lessons. I understand why: the proliferation of pornography accessible to our youth has made sexting and increasingly aggressive sexual activity ubiquitous problems for FCPS and school districts across the country. Studies have shown that a majority of pornography depicts violence against women. As the adage goes, “monkey see, monkey do.”

Still, the committee’s recommendation to remove clergy from the list of “trusted adults” is ridiculous, given that FCPS has been dogged by illegal sexual activity by its employees for years. In March, a Sandburg Middle School teacher was charged with possession of child pornography. Last year, a former girls’ basketball coach at Lake Braddock Secondary School was accused of sexually harassing players—the school administration kept him on staff for months after the allegation was raised. A 2016 investigation by the local News4 I-Team discovered that the response of FCPS to multiple teachers accused of sexual misconduct—with students, no less—had allowed those educators to keep their teaching licenses for years after the offenses. A Bailey’s Elementary School teacher was arrested in 2015 and charged with sexually assaulting a teenage boy between 2004 and 2010.

FCPS has repeatedly demonstrated its lack of responsibility with our children, maintaining a policy towards sex offenders more relaxed than my local Catholic diocesan schools, while introducing children to sexual practices fraught with health dangers. Why should I trust a school system that perpetuates the demonstrably false narrative that public school educators are more trustworthy than priests, pastors, or rabbis? It’s bad enough that one day my children may attend colleges that permit, if not encourage, the kinds of risky sexual behavior depicted in Jon Krakauer’s 2015 best-selling book Missoula. Without a proper education, they’ll lack the maturity to navigate these treacherous waters as 12- and 13-year-olds, let alone as college freshman. As Cicero warned, “the enemy is within the gates; it is with our own luxury, our own folly, our own criminality that we have to contend.”

I suppose I’m not terribly surprised by the increased abasement of the school district that educated me. When I was in tenth grade, a ninth grader at my school attended a party where she got drunk and was persuaded into a compromising position by upperclassmen. Those boys (who to my knowledge were never punished) took pictures and sent them to a popular local radio host, “Elliot in the Morning,” who spoke about them on-air. The girl was, of course, humiliated and ended up transferring schools. I think she even changed her name. (As an aside, how has that DC101 disc jockey avoided legal scrutiny? He spoke publicly about viewing what amounts to child pornography!) We’ve certainly come a long way since 1999. With handheld, Internet-accessible phones now ubiquitous among our children, how could things not descend into even more alarming harassment, abuse, and misogyny?

FCPS still boasts an impressive educational pedigree. As their website notes, the class of 2018 has 223 National Merit Semifinalists, and Fairfax County high schools are recognized annually by the Washington Post as some of the most challenging in the United States. Yet as C.S. Lewis warned, “education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil.” Teaching kids just entering puberty about how to “properly” use contraception and engage in safe anal sex can only be classified as a first-rate education in delinquency. Most American public schools have lost sight of Aristotle’s important maxim: “The happy life is regarded as a life in conformity with virtue…not spent in [sexual] amusement.”

Excluding my children from a public education is a hard decision for me, as I would think it is for many families—these are the institutions that have inculcated American ideas and ideals for generations of our citizens. I spent every year of grade school except kindergarten in the same public school district, which had an indelible impact on my socialization into our culture as well as on how I think and view the world. Public school districts also continue to employ huge numbers of our citizens: FCPS is the third largest employer in the state of Virginia. My mother spent more than 30 years in the system as an occupational therapist, from which she herself graduated in 1972. I was so inspired by my public education experience that I worked as a substitute and then a full-time high school history teacher, as well as a high school tennis coach.

Though I am a product of public schools and still take pride in my education, I won’t send my kids there—not as long as I can afford to send them elsewhere. Given the Catholic Church’s robust security policies in the wake of the early 2000s sex scandal, my kids are safer in my parish’s elementary school. My decision will stand until our public school systems—enduring what has become a nationwide sexual crisis—adopt policies that resist, rather than capitulate to, the worrying trends wreaking havoc on our families and our children.

Casey Chalk is a student at the Notre Dame Graduate School of Theology at Christendom College.

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Parkland shooter: ‘When you see me on the news, you’ll know who I am’

Cell phone videos taken by Nikolas Cruz before the Parkland shooting show that he was planning the attack in detail and looking forward to people seeing him on the news. The Sun-Sentinel reports:

In three chilling cellphone video clips, at least one of which appears to have been recorded on the day of the Feb. 14 shooting, Cruz, 19, calmly outlines his plans.

“When you see me on the news you’ll know who I am,” he says, chuckling. “You’re all going to die. Pew pew pew pew pew. Ah yeah. Can’t wait.”…

“My name is Nik, and I’m going to be the next school shooter of 2018,” he said. “My goal is at least 20 people.”…

“Today is the day. The day that it all begins. The day of my massacre shall begin,” Cruz says. “All the kids in school will run in fear and hide. From the wrath of my power they will know who I am.”…

Cruz offered only vague hints about his motive.

“I’ve had enough being told what to do and when to do. … Telling me I’m an idiot and a dumbass,” he says. “In real life, you’re all the dumbass. You’re all stupid and brainwashed.”

It seems to me the author of this piece is skipping over one obvious motive which Cruz mentioned repeatedly in these brief videos. First, everyone in school would know who he was. Second, everyone would see him on the news and know who he was. Third, in the last video below he says, “With the power of my AR, you will all know who I am.” He goes on to say, “You will all see. You will all know who my name is.”

Cruz seems pretty confident he’s about to become famous, so maybe we shouldn’t overlook that as part of his motive. As I suggested here, there’s a good argument to be made that school shooters, especially since Columbine, are inspired by the idea of becoming notorious killers. The media repeating their names and showing their faces on television, essentially making them instantly famous, inspires more troubled kids with few real prospects to aim for similar fame.

Watch this clip and notice that when he says “When you see me on the news you’ll know who I am,” is the only time he smiles. I’m contributing in a small way to that process but I think the larger issue is the network news and cable shows. I’m not looking for a any kind of law but maybe ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN, and Fox should consider not playing clips like this or referring to these shooters by name. If notoriety, even in death is their goal, maybe denying them that will result in fewer school shooters.

The post Parkland shooter: ‘When you see me on the news, you’ll know who I am’ appeared first on Hot Air.

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Wednesday evening links – AEI – American Enterprise Institute: Freedom, Opportunity, Enterprise

1. Chart of the Day I (above) shows graphically the amazing “life course dynamics of affluence” that summarize the research of Thomas Hirschl and Mark Rank, based on their empirical investigation of individual lifetime income data over a 44-year period for individuals from ages 25 to 60 to see what percentage of the American population would experience different levels of affluence during their lifetimes. The results above are striking and remarkable and were featured before on CD here and here, and totally worthy of a re-post here.

As Washington University professor Mark Rank wrote in a 2015 New York Times article about his research with Thomas Hirschl, “Rather than being a place of static, income-based social tiers, America is a place where a large majority of people will experience either wealth or poverty — or both — during their lifetimes.” The chart above is based on the data in Table 2 of the research paper and shows the following remarkable finding on income mobility in America:

More than half of American adults (53.1%) will be in the top 10% of the income distribution for one or more years between the ages of 25 and 60. But staying in the top 10% is much less likely, and only about one in three Americans (35.4%) remain in the top 10% for two consecutive years between ages of 25 and 60, about one in four (26.7%) for three or more consecutive years, about one in five (21.7%) for four or more years, and only about one in 13 (7.8%) stay in the top 10% for ten consecutive years or more.

Don’t the Hirschl and Rank findings above of significant income mobility (including the finding that nearly 70% of Americans make it into the top 20% for at least one year and nearly 62% for at least two years) pretty much destroy the narrative of income inequality being the “defining challenge of our time,” as we heard so frequently from Obama?

2. Chart of the Day II (above) shows annual US real manufacturing GDP value-added (in 2009 dollars) from 1997 to 2017, which increased to a new record all-time high of $1.955 trillion last year. It was the first time since the Great Recession since that the output (value added) of US factories surpassed the previous, pre-recession record high $1.925 trillion in 2007. While it took an entire decade, US manufacturing has now officially and completely recovered from the devastating effects of the Great Recession. Interestingly, I couldn’t find this manufacturing output milestone reported elsewhere, so perhaps you’ve heard it here first! Carpe vestibulum!

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3. Cartoon of the Day I (above), self-explanatory!

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4. Cartoon of the Day II (above), self-explanatory!

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5. Cartoon of the Day III (above), another great one from Michael Ramirez.

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6. Quotation of the Day is from Anatoly Kurmanaev writing in the Wall Street Journal (“The Tragedy of Venezuela“):

Growing up in provincial Russia in the 1990s, I lived through the collapse of a superpower and witnessed the corruption, violence and degradation that followed. I thought I had the street smarts to navigate Venezuela’s maddening Socialist bureaucracy and controls, while enjoying much nicer weather.

What struck me on arriving was how little the Socialist leaders cared about even the appearances of equality. They showed up at press conferences in shantytowns in motorcades of brand new armored SUVs. They toured tumbledown factories on live state TV wearing Rolexes and carrying Chanel handbags. They shuttled journalists to decaying state-run oil fields on private jets with gilded toilet paper dispensers.

7. Chart of the Day III (above) shows the gradual decline in average US round-trip, inflation-adjusted airfares, which have fallen by nearly 30%, from $485 in Q1 1995 to $347 in Q4 2017 (in 2017 dollars), inspired by the article by Robert Poole in the June issue of Reason MagazineIf You Can Afford a Plane Ticket, Thank Deregulation“:

In 1979, the first year of deregulation, the average domestic fare was $616 (in 2016 dollars), or 1.2% of average household income that year. The most recent comparable data I can find is for 2016, when the average fare was $344—a mere 0.6% of average household income.

So after adjusting for both inflation and increases in average household income, the cost of air travel in the US has fallen by 50% since deregulation.

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8. Chart of the Day IV (above) was inspired by Manhattan Institute fellow Robert Bryce’s New York Post article “Bad news for green energy lovers: US oil & gas are booming“:

The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has resulted in the fastest and biggest addition to world energy supply that has ever occurred in history. How big is that addition? Over the past decade, merely the increase — I repeat, just the increase — in US oil and gas production is equal to seven times the total energy production of every wind turbine and solar project in the United States (see chart above).

Climate-change activists like to claim that renewable energy can power the entire economy and that we should “do the math.” I couldn’t agree more — on the math part. In 2008, US oil production was about 5.2 million barrels per day. Today, it’s about 10.2 million barrels per day. In 2008, domestic gas production averaged about 55.1 billion cubic feet per day. Today, it’s about 87.6 billion cubic feet per day. That’s an increase of about 32.5 billion cubic feet per day, which is equivalent to about 5.5 million barrels of oil per day. Thus, over the past decade, US oil and gas output has jumped by about 10.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (see chart).

Let’s compare that to domestic solar and wind production which, since 2008, has increased by 4,800 percent and 450 percent, respectively. While those percentage increases are impressive, the total energy produced from those sources remains small when compared to oil and gas. In 2017, US solar production totaled about 77 terawatt-hours and wind production totaled about 254 terawatt-hours, for a combined total of 331 terawatt-hours. That’s the equivalent of about 1.5 million barrels of oil per day. Simple division (10.5 divided by 1.5) shows that since 2008, the increase in energy production from oil and gas is equal to seven times the energy output of all domestic solar and wind.

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9. Who’d a-Thunk It? Raising the minimum wage results in reduced fringe benefits for low-skilled workers? That’s the finding of an NBER research paper “The Minimum Wage, Fringe Benefits, and Worker Welfare,” here’s part of the conclusion (italics added):

We find robust evidence that recent state minimum wage increases resulted in declines in employer-sponsored health insurance for minimum wage earners. Our estimates also suggest that insurance and wage effects spill over to those earning above, but not far from, the minimum wage.

We conclude by observing that while employer insurance coverage is an important non-wage job attribute, it is but one of many non-wage job attributes. Our findings thus point to the need for an analysis of other job attributes and how they fluctuate with the minimum wage. Margins of interest, some of which have received attention in recent work, include the flexibility of work hours, implicit effort contracts, the pace of work and occupational safety. Standard theory suggests that such margins may have high relevance for worker welfare.

In other words, the researchers only examined the demonstrated reductions in employer-sponsored health insurance that result from increases in the minimum wage. As economic theory and basic logic tell us, health insurance is just one of many fringe benefits and job attributes that are adjusted by employers to the disadvantage of limited-experience workers following artificial, government-mandated increases in labor costs in the form of minimum wage laws. That is, minimum wage laws = minimum/reduced fringe benefit laws for the most vulnerable workers.

10. Video of the Day (below) features Charles Koch discussing the “History of Freedom” who takes a look across history at how increasing freedom and openness in society dramatically increases human well-being.

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Sleek Ice Cream Campaigns – Blue Bunny Debuts New Bunny Snack & Mini…

In an ice cream campaign that mixes luxury with sweet indulgence, Blue Bunny announces the latest flavors in its Mini Swirls and Bunny Snacks. The new additions for the former include Mint Cookie Crunch and Cinnamon Cereal – both inspired by Girl Scout Cookies and Cinnamon Toast Crunch respectively.

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