Border agent allegedly shoots, kills migrant woman after group of immigrants reportedly attacks him

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent on Wednesday shot and killed a migrant woman in Rio Bravo, Texas, BuzzFeed News reported.

What happened?

The agent was investigating a report of illegal activity near a culvert, according to the report. After he approached a group of immigrants, they reportedly tried to attack him with “blunt objects.” During the altercation, the agent shot a woman in the head.

According to the report, the agent gave the woman CPR until emergency crews arrived, but she later died from her injury. Other people ran after the shot was fired. They were later detained by other agents, Border Patrol told Buzz Feed.

Marta Martinez lives next to the site where the woman was shot, and she livestreamed what was happening on Facebook.

She told BuzzFeed she saw a woman lying on the ground but could not determine her age.

“I heard a Border Patrol agent screaming, ‘See what happens? See what you caused?’” Martinez told BuzzFeed.

According to Martinez, Border Patrol agents flipped the woman over and saw she was bleeding heavily from the left side of her face. Her video shows a Border Patrol agent walking out of an empty building with two people in handcuffs.

What else did the eyewitness say?

Martinez is heard saying to the agent, “Why did you kill that woman? You killed her. I saw you with the gun.”

She also said she did not see the migrants attacking the agent before the woman was shot.

“The girl was in the grass and trees; to me she was hiding,” Martinez told BuzzFeed. “They’re saying they threw rocks at the agents, but the two migrants were scared and the one guy was scared — they didn’t have rocks in their hands.”

The FBI and the Texas Rangers are investigating.

Figures released by the agency reflected a 73 percent increase in attacks on Border Patrol agents, from 454 in fiscal year 2016 to 786 in 2017.

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Laurie Fischer: Allow peaceful, law-abiding working immigrants out of the shadows

Milk is one of the most common and essential items on any American consumer’s grocery list. However, before it ever reaches your local grocery store shelf, the safe and abundant production of milk involves many steps — including top-quality animal care …

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Filthy Animals

Art by Michael Ramirez

MS 13 Gang MS13
MS 13 Gang MS13

USA –-(Ammoland.com)- Filthy Animals.

The implication by major news organizations that the president described all illegal immigrants as “animals” would indeed be a wretched thing for him to say — had he said it. He did not.

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MSNBC’s Kasie Hunt Asks House Candidate: Do You Think…

While interviewing Republican Congressional Candidate Lea Marquez Peterson on Sunday’s edition of KasieDC, MSNBC host Kasie Hunt tried to bait her into calling the President a racist by bringing up his comments referring to MS-13 gang members as “animals”: “The President earlier this week referred to some immigrants and drug dealers as well as animals, not as people. Do you think that rhetoric is racist?” Peterson, who hopes to succeed retiring Republican Congresswoman Martha McSally in an Arizona congressional district that Hillary Clinton won by five points, did not take the bait.

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Reading between the lions: A history of the New York Public Library

Out of all these tomes, the greatest tale might be Library’s own history: Founded by immigrants and industrialists, it was equally admired by William Howard Taft and Vladimir Lenin; open to all, it has counted among its staff American Olympians and …

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House GOP Seeks Last-Ditch Immigration Agreement Amid Rebellion

House Republican leaders are making a last-ditch effort to work out an agreement on immigration legislation as GOP hardliners conceded Tuesday that moderates would otherwise be able to force a vote on bipartisan proposals the conservatives oppose.

Representative Dennis Ross of Florida, a member of the Republican vote-counting team, said he was asked by party leaders to delay signing a petition that — with support from virtually all Democrats and a few dozen Republicans — would force Speaker Paul Ryan to hold votes on four immigration bills that he doesn’t want to bring to the floor.

{snip}

House Freedom Caucus leader Mark Meadows acknowledged that he expects moderate Republicans and Democrats can gather enough signatures to force a vote on the bipartisan proposals, including one to grant a citizenship path to young undocumented immigrants.

“They’ll get to 218” signatures, a majority of House members, said Meadows of North Carolina.

Still, he said that if the House passes a bill to protect the young immigrants known as dreamers, “it’s not going to become law so I’m not sitting here with fear and trembling.”

{snip}

Representative Mario Diaz-Balart, a Florida Republican who has signed the petition, expressed confidence that it’ll succeed.

“There’s no doubt that there are enough Republicans who will sign on,” he said in an interview. “This one’s done to bring out four different diverse solutions. It was done in a way not to be disruptive or for political grandstanding.”

Conservative House Republicans are seeking an immediate vote instead on a bill that would put new restrictions on legal immigration, sponsored by Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte of Virginia. Last week, members of the Freedom Caucus blocked a GOP farm bill on the House floor because they didn’t trust assurances from GOP leaders that the Goodlatte measure would get a vote.

Regarding the Freedom Caucus, Ross said, “I’m tired of the tail wagging the dog.” He said he had been told that GOP leaders are trying to negotiate an immigration bill with Democrats.

{snip}

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A South African Tragedy

Martin Bossenbroek, The Boer War, Seven Stories Press, 2018, 464 pp., $24.00.

The Second Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902) was a tragedy—even a “white-on-white crime.” The world’s greatest military power, the British Empire, waged war on a force of 60,000 South African Boer militiamen. Haughty British officers who had won renown fighting the Pathans in the Northwest Frontier or Madhi fanatics in Sudan thought the Boers were a similarly uncouth force that could never defeat a professional British Army. The initial successes of the Boers proved them wrong, and the British should have known better. During the First Boer War of 1880 to 1881, the South African Republic (also known as the Transvaal) and the Orange Free State won the right to self rule without interference from Cape Town, the base of British operations in South Africa.

As the Dutch historian Martin Bossenbroek explains in The Boer War, the second conflict was largely an attempt by the British to win control over the natural resources of the South African Republic. After the discovery of gold in Witwatersrand in 1885, the city of Johannesburg sprung up almost overnight. It became a boom town right out of the American Wild West, with bordellos and gambling dens. President Paul Kruger of the South African Republic and his fellow Boers despised Johannesburg and the foreigners who were drawn to it by the gold rush. Kruger, Prof. Bossenbroek writes, was a veld-bred farmer who came from the proud Voortrekker and epitomized Old Testament zeal.

Johannesburg reminded Boers of what they had left behind when they trekked out of Cape Colony in 1835. The liberty-loving Boers—a mix of Dutch, Huguenot, German, and Portuguese—resisted when the British first declared the Cape a “protectorate” before soon turning it into a colony. Boers moved eastward into the high veld, defeated several African tribes, and established the two republics—the South African Republic and the Orange Free State—that Britain sought to dominate in the war of 1899.

The Boer War is a wonderful throwback to the days of heroic history. First published in Dutch in 2012 and only recently translated into English, it divides the story into three parts. The first sets the scene with an account of South African politics and economics. The chief character is Cecil Rhodes, the brilliant mining magnate who established the colony of Rhodesia and envisioned all of South Africa as a British confederation. The Boers stood in the way of this Cape-to-Cairo vision.

The second part is about the war. It is filled with tales of battle, commando raids, and guerrilla warfare, and takes as its main character the former British Army officer and war correspondent Winston Churchill. Prof. Bossenbroek provides details about the divisions within the British Army (mainly between officers from the “Indian” vs. “the African” services) and about divisions within the Boer camp.

The final section deals with the guerrilla phase of the war. When the British could not decisively defeat the highly mobile and well-armed Boer commandos, they put Boer women and children in concentration camps so as to deprive the men of the support they needed. These filthy, disease-ridden camps became the great scandal of the early 20th century; today it is thought that some 26,000 inmates died. Despite this cruelty, some Boers fought alongside the British during the First World War.

Boer guerrillas during the Second Anglo-Boer War.

It is easy for Americans to identify with the Boers. Like the whites of North America, they are an ethnic hodgepodge, united by their Christian faith and shared experiences in the wilderness. In 1899, they wanted to be left alone in their republics; millions of white Americans feel the same way today.

Britain justified meddling in Boer affairs because of the non-Boer immigrants—mostly British—who rushed into the Transvaal during the gold rush. By the late 1890s, the Uitlanders, as the Afrikaners called them, were a majority in the cities of the Transvaal. Before long, these economic immigrants demanded voting rights and legal protection, but the South African Republic would not treat them like Boer citizens. Uitlanders then organized political action committees and even tried sabotage. In 1895, in one of the most disgraceful episodes in British imperial history, Cecil Rhodes tried to foment an Uitlander revolt that would give the British an excuse the come to the rescue of their persecuted citizens and take over the goldfields. The Jameson Raid of 1895  failed to stir up the expected rebellion, but was a sign of how seriously the British coveted South African resources.

Today, Mexico justifies agitating for anti-white, pro-Hispanic causes by claiming it is protecting its citizens. Often it doesn’t even try to hide its motivations, and groups such as La Raza make it clear that the goal of illegal immigration is Reconquista. Present-day America is no different from Victorian South Africa; demography is destiny.

Also, like the British of the 19th century, today’s egalitarians claim to have charitable motives. British do-gooders often criticized the Boers for failing to live up to their Christian duty to black and colored neighbors. The Boers understood very well whom they were dealing with and, unlike the British, actually knew how to make peace with African tribes. A similar cultural ignorance was repeated during the Apartheid era, when left-wing British governments and their allies harassed, boycotted, and harangued the Boers into giving blacks the right to vote. Since then, South Africa has spiraled into a chaos of corruption, rape, and murder. The commandos of 1900 could have predicted the consequences of black rule.

The Boer War makes for grim reading, but the conflict it describes was fought in an age of true manliness. Readers will be moved by the audacity and courage of both the British and the Boers.

It is terrible that the great British Empire that conquered Africa and India and established Singapore and Hong Kong arrayed its forces against the tiny but resolute republics of the Boers. These two people should never have fought each other. The Boer War is yet another warning to our people: European brotherhood and the future of the West are far more important than any temporary conflict or disagreement.

British casualties after the Battle of Spion Kop, January 24, 1900.

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Mayor signs off on immigrant defense funding for Public Defender’s Office

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee has signed off on a plan to provide some funding for legal defense to immigrants through the Public Defender’s Office, albeit at a far lower level than advocates had initially hoped for. Lee has agreed to authorize the San …

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Law Protects Immigrants From Questions About Legal Status in Court

In the national battle over immigrant rights, the latest conflict in California was over faster than the war for the territory in 1847. Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that protects immigrants from having to disclose their legal status in court.

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