Howard University Student At Center Of Embezzlement Scandal Says He’s Innocent: ‘People Are Making These Stories Up’

Y’all need to back off Tyrone Hankerson. The Howard University law school student at the center of a school embezzlement scandal says all the financial aid he has received is legit. The 25-year-old from Atlanta, Georgia suffered the heat of a social media …

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DoubleStar Exhibiting Edged Weapons Line at BLADE Show 2018

New collaborations from Kim Breed and Hakim Isler will be on display at Table #20H at Atlanta’s Cobb Galleria Centre, June 1 – 3, 2018.

Drakon Blade with Cerakote finish
Drakon Blade with Cerakote finish

Winchester, Ky. (Ammoland.com) – DoubleStar Corp, manufacturers of high-quality, US-made AR components, rifles and pistols, will be exhibiting its edged weapons line at BLADE Show 2018, to be held in the Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta, Georgia, June 1 – 3, 2018. New collaborations from Kim Breed and Hakim Isler will be on display, as well as product staples such as the Brimstone Folder Knife, Drakon™ Blade, Fang™ Blade, MOTAC™ Blade, Fury™ Machete and Wrath™ CrashHawk. There will also be Drakon Blades in several special Cerakote® finishes debuted during the show.

DoubleStar recently announced two new collaborations with BLADE® Magazine’s Field Editor, Kim Breed, and with published author, television star and Iraqi War veteran, Hakim Isler. The Chico Diablo-X, designed with Breed, and the Path Seeker, designed with Isler, are affordable production versions of their designs that will be on display for the first time at the BLADE Show.

DoubleStar’s Edged Weapon Division was first unveiled at BLADE Show 2017. It is led by Rob Cabrera, its Director, and the designer of Filo Bladeworks. In addition to Breed and Isler, the Edged Weapon Division now features edged weapons designed by Ret. Sergeant Major and owner, operator and founder of TCT Knives, Darrin Sirois, as well as designs by the founder of FILIPINO COMBAT SYSTEMS, Tuhon Ray Dionaldo.

BLADE Show, hosted by BLADE Magazine, the world’s number one knife community and publication, is the destination for the best selection of knives and knife products found anywhere. Globally recognized exhibitors and legendary makers gather under one roof to introduce attendees to the largest selection of blades, knives and outdoor gear and accessories in the world. Over 700 tables, 450+ booths and 40 display tables of the world’s best and most in demand knives will be on display. From renowned custom knife makers to the industry’s best in mass production, BLADE Show is a cut above the competition. Tactical, utility, hand-forged, camping, art, hunting, fixed, folding, kitchen, Damascus, military, antiques and other knives, as well as the equipment and materials to make, sharpen and maintain them, will all be on display at the world’s largest knife show.

For more information about DoubleStar, visit www.star15.com.


About DoubleStar Corp.:DoubleStar

DoubleStar Corp., located in Winchester, Kentucky, was formed when customers of J&T Distributing, a leading manufacturer and supplier of thousands of AR15 parts and accessories, requested complete rifles and pistols crafted from the same high-quality, U.S.-made components. DoubleStar now manufactures and supplies not only the commercial market but military and law enforcement forces across the world with rugged and dependable firearms. www.star15.com

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The Saudi Arabian Government Just Purchased This Home, A Piece Of American History, For $43M

When Steve Case, the ultra-wealthy co-founder of AOL, heard that the Saudi Arabian government was interested in his Virginia mansion, he got excited. Because it had a $43,000,000 price tag, Case was eager to sell it off to the highest bidder. Despite the mansion being a beacon of American history, he sold it off to a foreign government because they offered the right amount of cash.

Case’s former property was once the residence of Jackie Kennedy when she was a teenager after her mother remarried.

It is called the Merrywood estate, which is located in McLean, Virginia. Case listed it for sale for $49.5 million but sold it for a bargain to the Saudi government for $43 million.

The property was built back in 1919. It housed Jackie Kennedy Onassis when she was a teenager. But in 2005, Steve Case, the co-founder of AOL, purchased it for $24.5 million. In a little more than a decade, he has nearly doubled his investment on the property, which is considered part of American history.

The mansion is humongous. It contains 13 bathrooms and nine bedrooms. You can enjoy a game on the tennis court on the estate or a dip in the luxury pool.

The deal closed last week. And it has just become the most expensive deal ever recorded in the Washington, D.C. area. And now the piece of history is owned by the Middle Eastern country’s government.

Jackie Kennedy Onassis moved to the mansion when she was twelve-years-old. Her mother had remarried Standard Oil heir Hugh D. Auchincloss Jr.

The Saudi government plans to use the estate when delegates visit the United States to discuss politics. The governmental spokeswoman said:

“The Saudi government understands the historical significance of the Merrywood home and has tremendous respect for its place in American history.”

Twelve years after Case bought the property with his wife Jean in 2005, he listed it for $49.5 million with Mark C. Lowham of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty and Juliana E. May of JLL, reports the Daily Mail.

“We enjoyed living in Merrywood for the past 13 years, and we hope the new owner will appreciate the property as much as we did,” the couple said in a statement.

Case and his wife sold the property because the no longer need such a large estate. With their children out of the home, they decided to downsize despite their massive wealth. They will move to a farm in Warrenton, which used to be their weekend home. They also have an apartment in Washington, D.C.

Case came to his wealth after founding America Online (AOL) with computer programmer Marc Seriff. Case was chairman and CEO of AOL Time Warner until he resigned in 2003. Now he is a chief executive at the investment firm Revolution. Meanwhile, his wife Jean serves as the chairman of the National Geographic Society.

The mansion is 23,000 square feet and in the Georgian style. It is just eight miles from the nation’s capital. For foreign dignitaries, the mansion offers a quick ride over to D.C. for meetings.

What do you think about this piece of twentieth-century American history?

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Hollywood, Fl. native racks up big screen credits in Hollywood, Ca….

After graduation from a magnet program in Language at Hallandale High School, she attended the University of Georgia in Atlanta, where her talents in track and field earned her a full scholarship and she majored in sports marketing, graduating in 2005. She moved to California with the intention of becoming a track and field star and eventually competing in the Olympics.

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High schoolers busted for cheating off social media post

At least 80 students at a high school in Georgia cheated on their final exams, all thanks to a photo that circulated on social media, school officials said. Teachers at Dacula High School in Gwinnett County believe the social media post made during the last week of classes originated from someone outside the school, but administrators spotted it and busted dozens of 10th-graders for cheating on their finals in language arts, chemistry and world history, the Gwinnett Daily Post reports .

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At slave auctions children were forcibly separated from their mothers …

On March 2 and 3, 1859, Pierce Mease Butler of the Butler Plantation estates in the Georgia Sea Islands sold 436 men, women, and children, including 30 babies, to buyers and speculators from New York to Louisiana. Slave auctions were long a part of the fabric of American life, but on the eve of the Civil War, this unprecedented sale was noteworthy not only for its size but because of the fact that the Gullah Geechee slaves of Butler Island, Georgia, had generally not been sold on the open market.

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Parents facing charge after giving teen marijuana to treat alleged seizures

A Georgia family has been torn apart after authorities placed a 15-year-old teen in a group home following a tip from his therapist that his parents gave him marijuana in an effort to control his seizures. David Brill, whose parents Suzeanna and Matthew spent six days in jail after their arrest, allegedly suffers from near-constant seizures.

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Why I Get Furious When Anti-Gunners Think We Support Mass Shootings

Yesterday was kind of a rough day for me. Most of you don’t know and don’t care about my personal life, and that’s fine. I’m just some guy who writes about gun rights on the internet. You don’t need to know anything about me.

But this time, you might find my personal life a little interesting. It relates to why I get so damn furious when anti-gunners claim we somehow want to see people die in mass shootings, that we somehow don’t care.

For me, mass shootings aren’t just a thing that happens. They’re a little personal. It’s why a Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School teacher absolutely infuriated me with this tweet.

You see, six years ago yesterday, I lost a dear friend in a mass shooting.

The place was a coffee shop in Seattle, Washington called the Cafe Racer. I’ve never been there, though it’s on the list of places to visit if I get the chance. I have no idea if the coffee is any good or not, and I really don’t care.

What I care about is that it was a place where a woman named Kimberly Lynn Layfield enjoyed spending time at.

Kim and I met in 8th grade. I’d just transferred into a new school, this one a private school that was created for more working-class families. Because of how so many teachers like to seat people according to the alphabet, I got seated right by Kim.

She was gorgeous, an absolute stunner. She had the kind of looks that let so many girls get away with being total snobs; only Kim wasn’t. She was exceptionally friendly to the new kid and became one of my first friends at the new school. She preferred to hang out with the kids who weren’t the popular ones necessarily. She didn’t like the mean girl schtick, after all, and we were a lot more genuine.

Throughout high school, Kim was there. She was special. Always friendly and eager to meet anyone special in my life. She was smart, funny, and down-to-earth, the kind of person anyone would want to hang out with.

After we graduated and I went into the Navy, I lost touch with her until our fifth-year reunion (yes, we did that). She came in and plopped down right next to me to catch up. She was living in Chicago at the moment, and she was really living. Then we lost touch again until I came across an independent film she’d been in. I emailed the director and asked him to pass my email to Kim.

I heard from her the next day, and we started catching up again.

Because of the time delay between Seattle, where she was living, and Georgia, we didn’t talk all that much. But social media let us stay abreast of what was going on in each other’s lives.

Until six years ago today.

That was when I logged into Facebook and saw activity in the group set aside for people who had graduated from our school. It was there that I learned that one of the fatalities in the Seattle coffee shop shooting the day before was none other than Kim.

At the time, I was the editor and owner of a small local news site. I had the news, no one else did. My journalistic instinct said to run the story. I just couldn’t, though. I wanted verification. Someone had to confirm it. Part of it was wanting to be very professional. The other part was praying that the news was wrong, that Kim was fine and it was a misunderstanding.

It wasn’t.

I’m going to be honest here. For a moment, shortly after I pulled my bawling butt up off of the floor under my desk where I’d collapsed upon hearing the news, I began to rethink my position on the Second Amendment. Could I have been wrong?

A moment later, I remembered that my position included the fact that sometimes jackwagons were going to be jackwagons and I wasn’t about to stop them. No law I could think of, except for possibly an outright ban on all firearms, would have saved Kim’s life. Even a ban might not have done the trick.

In other words, the Second Amendment and lawful gun owners weren’t to blame for Kim’s death. It was a pathetic maniac who couldn’t deal with the fact that the coffee shop didn’t want him in there anymore. That was it.

I don’t know that most of Kim’s circle of friends from back in the day feel the same way. I don’t know either way. I don’t know how her parents feel on the subject of guns, either. I haven’t asked them and, frankly, I don’t want to.

But what I do know is that I get livid when people act like I don’t care about those affected by mass shootings, that I somehow like this kind of thing. It’s bad enough when it’s someone else who has been impacted but imagine how it feels when it’s from someone who has only seen these things on the news?

Contrary to what they might think, violence affects people of all political ideologies. Further, being touched by it doesn’t necessarily transform you into a raging anti-gun zealot.

People on this side of the debate have been touched by violence as well. We simply have a different approach to the problem and pretending we somehow are ambivalent or worse, supportive of such violence, doesn’t help anyone. Instead, it makes it harder and harder to be civil in public debate.

I have no issue that people disagree with me. In truth, I don’t actually think they’re bad people because they disagree with me. I just think they’re wrong.

Meanwhile, they apparently think that I’m evil, all because I refuse to change my mind simply because of feelings, even when that feeling is loss and pain from one of the best people I’ve ever known being stolen from the world.

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