Maine bill says home economics classes should be mandatory

Eighth-grader Sam Gerber carefully holds a paring knife to the outside of a red apple, slowly cutting away the skin in small flecks. Beside him, Sabelle Guido waits to chop up the apple, which is destined for an apple crisp. Across the small classroom kitchenette, Kim Clifford is mixing pieces of butter with oats and brown sugar.
It’s fourth period at Lincoln Middle School in the Portland School District, where all eighth-graders are required to take family and consumer science class – a class known to students of an earlier generation as “home ec,” short for home economics.
“Kids need these skills,” said Rhonda Mayer, who’s been teaching the course for 31 years. “Yes, for some it’s viewed as old-fashioned, but I think these skills are timeless.”

An anonymous man saved her son’s life. Now, the mom wants to find him — and pay for his dry cleaning

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Mary Graham wants to find the man who saved her son's life to thank him — and pay for his dry cleaning.
At a Subway in Alsip on Tuesday night, a stranger dislodged a Dorito from her son's throat, she said.
He was vomited on in the process and left before she had the chance to thank him.
"I don't even know the words I'd say," Graham said. "I'd probably just cry and tell him thank-you. I don't know what I would have done if he wasn't there. Nobody else was realizing what was going on."

Full Story: http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/daily-southtown/news/ct-sta-woman-looks-for-man-saved-sons-life-st-0405-20170406-story.html

Hillary Clinton unlikely to return to family foundation

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Hillary Clinton has all but ruled out returning to her family’s foundation, three sources close to the former Democratic nominee tell The Hill. 

The former Democratic presidential nominee has indicated to confidants and associates that she more than likely won’t be returning to the Clinton Foundation, which drew headlines in the 2016 election cycle for possible conflicts of interest. 

3 wanted felons arrested in hunt for Amber Alert suspect Clarence Davis

As authorities spent the overnight hours searching for a man tied to Tuesday’s Amber Alert, officers wound up finding three wanted felons.

It happened when police received a tip that Clarence Davis might be at the Sweethearts Bar in Cleveland. Officers entered the bar with guns drawn, but Davis wasn’t there. Instead, the raid resulted in the discovery and arrest of three wanted felons unrelated to the Davis case.
Davis has been on the loose since an Amber Alert was triggered Tuesday morning when he allegedly kidnapped his girlfriend’s children at gunpoint on Chardon Road in Willoughby Hills.

World War III nightmare scenario brewing in the East China Sea

While the world watches mounting military tensions in the South China Sea, another, more ominous situation is brewing in the East China Sea that could be the trigger point for a major war between the superpowers. At the heart of tensions are eight uninhabited islands controlled by Japan that are close to important shipping lanes, rich fishing grounds and potential oil and gas reserves. China contests Japan's claims and is escalating its military activity in Japan airspace. In response, Japan has been doubling its F-15 jet intercepts.

The situation increases the risk of an accidental confrontation — and could draw other countries, like the United States, into a conflict. It's a topic President Trump will likely bring up with Chinese President Xi Jinping at his Mar-a-Lago estate this week.

Top Obama Adviser Sought Names of Trump Associates in Intel

White House lawyers last month learned that the former national security adviser Susan Rice requested the identities of U.S. persons in raw intelligence reports on dozens of occasions that connect to the Donald Trump transition and campaign, according to U.S. officials familiar with the matter.

The pattern of Rice's requests was discovered in a National Security Council review of the government's policy on "unmasking" the identities of individuals in the U.S. who are not targets of electronic eavesdropping, but whose communications are collected incidentally. Normally those names are redacted from summaries of monitored conversations and appear in reports as something like "U.S. Person One."